Milito finds perfection at Wildwood Lanes

by |
01/10/2011 7:32 PM |

GARRET MEADE PHOTO | Travis Walker rolled a 224 in the third game for Riverhead.

Because of an unfamiliar oil pattern, Wildwood Lanes had not been Jeremy Milito’s favorite bowling alley. But the Sachem East High School senior may be feeling more kindly to the Riverhead house after what happened on Monday night.

Milito rolled his second career 300 game, and the Flaming Arrows needed it, too.

With the help of Milito’s perfect game, Sachem East won the third game by 22 points, 1,073-1,051, capping a 21-12 victory over the Riverhead Blue Waves and taking first place in Suffolk County League III. The matchup of the league’s top two teams saw them split the first two games on Monday, with Riverhead winning the first game, 1,047-913, and Sachem East taking the second game, 1,081-909.

Defending county and league champion Sachem East raised its point total to 184, seven more than Riverhead. Furthermore, the Flaming Arrows hold the advantage of a match in hand.

Milito, Sachem East’s anchorman who entered the match with a 228.3 average, also threw a 207 and a 237 for a 744 series, his fourth 700-plus series of the season. He finished with 25 strikes and six spares.

Last season Milito bowled a 300 in Sachem East’s home alley, Bowl Long Island in Patchogue. He might have even surprised himself by duplicating the feat at the Riverhead venue, which hasn’t been kind to him or the Flaming Arrows over the years.

“I’ve struggled here in the past,” Milito said. “I’ve never bowled good here before, but I just came in with a good mind-set and took a game plan. It’s really rough because the lanes are really touchy, so you have to be pretty good, accurate.”

This is the second 300 this season for Sachem East. Matt Hecker, a junior, threw one a couple of weeks ago.

“It’s very special,” Sachem East Coach Mike Stanek said of Milito’s big game. “He bowls all the time. He’s in the tournaments, he travels. He’s lefty. That helps. He’s a great kid. His attitude is superior. He’s very confident and that’s what it takes.”

Riverhead senior Jon Horton is familiar with Milito’s work, having seen him bowl on numerous occasions. “He hits his mark every time, which is why he bowls 300s,” Horton said. “He makes it look so much more simpler than it really is.”

GARRET MEADE PHOTO | Jon Horton and his Riverhead teammates were dislodged from first place in League III by Sachem East.

With “Xs” dotting the monitor next to his name, Milito headed into the 10th and final frame with more than a tight match on the line (Riverhead might have won had Milito not thrown a strike on his first ball in the 10th frame).

“It’s really nerve-racking. It’s kind of scary,” he said. “You really want to be concentrated, but you don’t really want to be too tense because then you’ll miss your shots. You want to be as relaxed as possible.”

A hush fell over the crowd of spectators and bowlers as Milito let go of his final ball of the day.

“I was just praying that they would all go down,” he said. “One went down late.”

After all 10 pins fell, Milito received high-fives and hugs from happy teammates who congratulated him.

“That guy there is topnotch,” Riverhead Coach Scott Hackal said. “He threw one ball that was marginally high, maybe. The rest were all great shots.”

Stanek, who said it was his team’s first win at Wildwood Lanes in six or seven years, remarked: “That was huge. We needed every bit of it.”

Sachem East also received a boost from Steve Sabella. Sabella scored a 688 series with games of 212, 244 and 232. He had 22 strikes and 10 spares.

Riverhead, which had beaten Sachem East last month at Bowl Long Island, was led by Adam Vail, who recorded 22 strikes and eight spares. Vail’s opening and ending games of 237 and 247 helped him to a 675 series. Anthony Trent added a 642 series with a 241 high game. With the help of 17 strikes and 15 spares, Elliot Jones finished with a 621 series for the Blue Waves. Travis Walker had a 565 series and Horton a 504.

“It was a big match,” said Walker, who scored a 224 in the third game. “We lost a pretty close game. A guy bowls a 300 with a spare. You can’t do much about that.”

Milito said this 300 was more gratifying than the first one he had rolled because he felt he did more to earn it. Recollecting his final shot of the night, he said: “There was so much satisfaction in that shot, too. It was all worth it.”

bliepa@timesreview.com

119 Comment

  • Ms. Hodun also announced she would not take a pay raise for the 2011-2012 school year.

  • Thats very generous and supportive but what is her contract salary?

  • In regards to the administrative reductions: are those positions that are being eliminated and will result in two administrators being laid-off? Or are they, as is rumored, simply the switching of a job title and the resignation of another? If this is the case, I do not see how they can really be seen as cuts. If up to 37 faculty members and 18 members of the support staff will be losing their jobs, it seems that more needs to be cut from the “top” rather from the areas that have a direct impact on the students.

  • What is the status of the teacher’s contract-is it due to be negotiated? Or was it completed last year without sharing the information with residents?

  • I feel that the increase in healthcare costs is a very understated contributor to this budget disaster. The exorbitant rise in health insurance premiums has been devastating for small businesses, schools, state employers, etc., throughout the nation. Why do the insurance companies/government think that everyone can just suddenly afford a 30-40% increase in their healthcare? It’s not like everyone’s getting raises (if they’re lucky enough to be employed in the first place). Aren’t there certain things in the US that should be guaranteed? Like access to affordable healthcare?

  • It’s under 200k, almost considered a modest salary for a superintendent. However, I remain unimpressed by her “sacrifice.” Possibly a pay cut would go further in displaying her conviction? Anyhow, it won’t make an ounce of difference in the end result.

  • Emtom you are right – say she even took a 50% paycut – that’s just a minute fraction of what the school needs to operate with these high administrative salaries and benefit costs.

  • http://seethroughny.net/PayrollsPensions/tabid/55/Payrolls/StatePayroll/tabid/69/Default.aspx?BRANCHID=6

    Go to schools, then agency/area, then scroll to Miller Place. All payroll data is there.

  • How will this directly impact the children? If 37 faculty members and 18 support staff are to be losing their jobs won’t class size increase? How many students will be in each class at the primary level? This is disconcerting as this is the foundation of the educational experience, particularly for students who have only had half-day Kindergarten. How many administrators are truly essential?

  • In the high school there is a principle, asst. principle, an asst. to the asst. principle, a dean of students, operation people who job it is to take messages from one office to another, a slew of asst. to clerical aides and secretary’s, so very many unnecessary people when that money should be going towards the students. The money we in Miller Place pay in taxes is high and our students get little in return – Not only educationally but also what clubs and programs are offered.
    I have lived in this district for 17 yrs and have 2 sons still in school now at the high school level.
    Let me just add, I have kept this brief.

  • Thanks for the link on salaries, I found it VERY interesting.

  • Why the need for an asst. principle at Laddy Decker for grades 3,4 & 5?

  • Susan Hodun will hopefully be in those cuts! There is serious bullying going on in Middle School and High School that she herself just looks past, we need people in the schools that care!

  • Whoa… thank you for that link. EVERYONE should take a look at that.

  • In answer to Longfellow: The need for an assistant principal at Laddie Decker is a simple one. The current principal is inept as well as a silent bully. Past principals Mr. Laddie Decker and Mrs. Robin Sorrentino were ready, willing, and above all, capable of serving and controlling the school and they did it with class. Mrs. Honeyman on the other hand is not, hence the reason for bring in an assistant principal, who is equally as inept as the current principal. Miller Place School District is in need of a total overhaul, from administration, to board of ed, to the PTO and so on… The taxpayers of Miller Place need to band together to accomplish this effort or the situation will only get worse.

  • In answer to Longfellow: The need for an assistant principal at Laddie Decker is a simple one. The current principal is inept as well as a silent bully. Past principals Mr. Laddie Decker and Mrs. Robin Sorrentino were ready, willing, and above all, capable of serving and controlling the school and they did it with class. Mrs. Honeyman on the other hand is not, hence the reason for bring in an assistant principal, who is equally as inept as the current principal. Miller Place School District is in need of a total overhaul, from administration, to board of ed, to the PTO and so on… The taxpayers of Miller Place need to band together to accomplish this effort or the situation will only get worse.