Video: Brookhaven National Lab’s State of the Lab address

03/04/2011 5:47 PM |

JENNIFER GUSTAVSON PHOTO | Hugh O'Neill, president of Appleseed, the firm that recently completed an economic impact report on BNL, stressed the importance of the lab as an economic hub for Long Island at Friday’s first-ever State of the Lab address.

With federal budget cuts looming large over Brookhaven National Laboratory, officials stressed the importance of the lab as an economic hub for Long Island at Friday’s first-ever State of the Lab address.

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Hugh O’Neill, president of Appleseed, the firm that recently completed an economic impact report on BNL, said the lab’s economic output for the 2009 fiscal year included the creation of 5,400 jobs throughout New York State–including 5,190 of them on Long Island.

Last month, Congressman Tim Bishop publicly opposed steep cuts in a federal spending plan passed by the House of Representatives, which could force the Lab to cut a third of its work force and close two cutting edge facilities.

Mr. O’Neill, along with Mr. Bishop, Brookhaven Town Supervisor Mark Lesko, state Senator Ken LaValle and other elected officials and local leaders who attended the event said high technology job creation through BNL are the future of Long Island’s economy.

jennifer@northshoresun.com

103 Comment

  • BNL is one of 10 nationwide facilities run by the federal government. These are government – not private sector jobs – you’re referring to. BNL’s employees have the dubious distinction of having polluted both the Carmans and Peconic River systems, and poisoned the public who ate mercury contaminated fish. They’ve destroyed once lucrative local fisheries and restaurants at the headwaters of the Peconic River. They’ve cost the taxpayers multimillions in cleanup costs and have left the landscape ravaged with radioactive contaminants such as carbon-14, tritium, cesium 137 and strontium 90. The long half-life of carbon-14 means Long Islanders will be dealing with radioactive contaminants at that site for the next 87,000 years.