10/03/13 6:00am
BARBARAELLEN KOCH FILE PHOTO  |

BARBARAELLEN KOCH FILE PHOTO | Workers harvest grapes at a North Fork farm this summer.

On your story regarding the problem North Fork farmers are having in hiring people to help with the crops and the harvest, this is just a small part of the entire attitude of workers in today’s American welfare state.

A person who is out of work in New York can receive up to $405 a week, or $21,060 a year, for doing nothing except sitting home watching television. A person who is on welfare in NYC can also sit at home doing nothing except watching television, even while welfare provides the equivalent of an hourly pre-tax wage of $14.75, or $30,680 a year.

All while people who are not a citizen of this country, and are here to make enough money to support their families back home, wherever that might be, labor for a $12/hour salary working in 100-degree heat.

So the farmer on the North Fork is caught on the horns of a dilemma, where on one hand he is unable to get Americans to do the farm work and, on the other hand, there is less and less foreign labor to do the same work at equivalent costs.

03/28/13 6:00am

To the editor:

With so many of our politicians concerned for the health and well-being of their constituents, with their laws on banning large sugary drinks, hiding cigarettes behind the counters as well as banning “energy drinks” from teenagers, I have to wonder why not one of these elected officials has ever proposed a bill to ban the sale of all tobacco products as well?

With the various diseases and physical problems that tobacco causes, along with the billions of dollars in associated treatment costs, there is a compelling reason to stop the use of tobacco. Yet these same “concerned” public officials continue playing to the news media instead of just saying: “No more tobacco will be sold here!”

Thomas W. Smith, Jamesport

To read more letters to the editor, pick up a copy of this week’s News-Review or click on the E-Paper.

01/24/13 6:00am
TIM GANNON PHOTO  |  A giant pile of superstorm Sandy debris has sat in front of Sheila Ganetis' Morningside Avenue home in Jamesport for almost two months. Town officials say she'll need to pay to get the junk removed.

TIM GANNON PHOTO | A giant pile of superstorm Sandy debris has sat in front of Sheila Ganetis’ Morningside Avenue home in Jamesport for almost two months. Town officials say she’ll need to pay to get the junk removed.

To the editor:

I read in the News-Review an article concerning the debris left over from Hurricane Sandy and the town’s refusal to pick it up from the front of Sheila Ganetis’ property in Jamesport.

Back in October I saw dozens of homes with plastic bags filled with leaves sitting at the side of town roads. I sent an e-mail to the Town Board wondering about this and if the town would be picking them up. A reply indicated that the town would only pick up leaves that were in paper bags, and would not pick up leaves in plastic bags.

This month the town started picking up the last of the debris left over from the hurricane along Peconic Bay Boulevard. This included tree stumps and limbs, lumber and other assorted debris. With this pickup the dozens of plastic bags of leaves, as well as piles of loose leaves, had suddenly disappeared.

I sent another e-mail to the Town Board asking about why the town had now decided to pick up leaves in plastic bags, and in response Town Board member Giglio replied: “The decision to pick up those leaves is the sole discretion of the highway superintendent.”

So I now have to wonder why in certain areas of Jamesport everything is being picked up regardless of what was stated previously, while in other areas town officials are saying it’s not their responsibility?

Thomas W. Smith,

JAMESPORT

To read all of the Letters to the Editor, pick up a copy of the News-Review on newsstands or click on the E-Paper.