06/20/15 6:00am
A screen registered boaters will reach on their smartphones when they use the SlipFinder app to locate a last minute reservation for a boat berth. (Credit: Courtesy)

Registered boaters can use the SlipFinder app to locate a last minute reservation for a boat berth.

Need to order a pizza? Click on an app. Need to book a plane ticket? Click on an app for that, too.

Need to find an open slip at a marina while out on the water? Well, now there’s an app for that.

The app SlipFinder — a recent addition to the boating world designed by two Long Islanders — allows boaters to make last-minute accommodations from their smartphone. Several local marinas have signed on with the app this season, while others remain skeptical over its effectiveness.

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06/05/15 12:00pm
06/05/2015 12:00 PM

An osprey couple is preparing for the birth of its three babies in a nest on the North Fork.

Best of all, you can be there to watch it. The hatchlings’ arrival — expected any day now — is being filmed and shown via a live video stream online.

Tax Reduction Services (TRS) is sponsoring Osprey Zone, a website that allows people to watch the osprey couple, affectionately named George and Gracie, in their nest with a view of the Peconic Bay.

The exact location of the nest hasn’t been revealed since the company doesn’t want people spooking the birds, said TRS president Paul Henry.

The feed has been live on the site since June 1. The osprey family has been seen nesting in that location since April, according to comments on the site.

Mr. Henry, who set up the streaming software, said he plans on making the website a permanent installation. He’ll use clips from the footage filmed this summer to make a documentary that will run on the site during the winter.

“We have footage from last year when they started building the nest and we’re getting footage of the babies being born and fed and learning to fly,” he said. “Hopefully during next spring, they come back and do it all again.”

Osprey Zone also features saved videos. The one- to two-minute long clips feature the birds returning to the nest with a fish, guarding the eggs, communicating with each other and more.

Mr. Henry said that while the hatching of the babies is exciting, there’s more to the birds’s story than that.

“There’s a wonderful story about how [the osprey] came back from near extinction,” he said. “That’s a very big part of story and my interest as well.”

He said that while he has a personal interest in both the osprey and filming, TRS is sponsoring the livestream for the community and Long Island as a whole to enjoy.

“I really think this is a really valuable thing here,” said Mr. Henry. “We have people contacting us who are bedridden, students, or disabled who are just watching it and enjoying it. It’s kind of calming. I think there’s a certain medicinal value to it in the way it affects people.”

nsmith@timesreview.com

 

02/26/15 8:00am
02/26/2015 8:00 AM
The Baiting Hollow shoreline was covered in ice this past week. The icing represents the worst freeze of Long Island Sound in decades, according to experts and historical accounts. (Credit: Jerry McGrath)

The Baiting Hollow shoreline was covered in ice this past week. The icing represents the worst freeze of Long Island Sound in decades, according to experts and historical accounts. (Credit: Jerry McGrath)

You could be forgiven for thinking this February has been colder than usual. It has. But just how much colder — a staggering 10.8 degrees below normal — has surprised even meteorologists, who say the month is on track to become Long Island’s coldest February on record.

The consistent cold snap has caused a rare phenomenon, one not seen for nearly 40 years: Long Island Sound is freezing over, so to speak.

“I’ve never seen it freeze over like this,” said Dominick Mavellia of Southold, whose home overlooks the frozen waters. “It looks like Antarctica … it’s quite beautiful.”  (more…)

02/20/15 8:00am
02/20/2015 8:00 AM
Brad Bocksel and his father, Robert, preparing artifacts for accession to Fraunces Tavern Museum. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

Brad Bocksel and his father, Robert, preparing artifacts for accession to Fraunces Tavern Museum. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

Brad Bocksel is a treasure hunter, but he’s not in it for the cash. He started digging up lost artifacts — ranging from silver coins to bullets used in the Civil War — when he was in middle school, and more than two decades later he’s never sold a single one.

He’s no hoarder of history either.

To prove it — though it’s not as if anyone dared him — Mr. Bocksel turned over some of his most prized possessions last Wednesday to the Fraunces Tavern Museum, a building that dates to Colonial times at 54 Pearl Street in lower Manhattan and is owned and operated by the Sons of the Revolution preservation group.

All 20 donated items originated from the Colonial and Revolutionary War periods.

Mr. Bocksel found them on his family’s Main Road farm in Aquebogue and other places on the North Fork.

(more…)

02/01/15 10:22am
02/01/2015 10:22 AM
Chris Paparo with his red-tailed hawk, Emmy, on a farm in Baiting Hollow. Mr. Paparo, a licensed falconer, has trained the bird to catch prey and come to him on demand, an activity that dates back thousands of years. Emmy has caught more than two dozen animals so far this falconing season. (Credit: Paul Squire)

Chris Paparo with his red-tailed hawk, Emmy, on a farm in Baiting Hollow. Mr. Paparo, a licensed falconer, has trained the bird to catch prey and come to him on demand, an activity that dates back thousands of years. Emmy has caught more than two dozen animals so far this falconing season. (Credit: Paul Squire)

High over the wooded hills just north of Lewin Farm in Baiting Hollow, Emmy the red-tailed hawk sits in her tree, watching me intently. Somehow, I sense her disapproval as the thick underbrush snags on my jeans and jacket. I fumble my way out of the thorns.  (more…)