09/09/17 5:55am
09/09/2017 5:55 AM

Immigration to America is one of the most contentious political issues of the day. Who gets to come here and work and who gets to stay has been hotly and emotionally debated for years, even more so this week with the president’s decision to end the so-called Dreamers program that allowed some 800,000 young people who entered the country without proper paperwork to stay.

READ

08/24/17 5:55am
08/24/2017 5:55 AM

American history has been in turmoil these last few weeks.

For some who have been in the news of late, there is no hard truth to settle on. There are no certainties, no accepted “this is what happened” that forms the timeline and foundation of the American experience. For some, political points to be scored, personal grudges to be aired, are the shapers of the truth they accept for themselves. The truth is an inconvenience.

READ

08/14/17 5:55am
08/14/2017 5:55 AM

One hundred years ago, when Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County was started, Long Island had over 100,000 acres of farmland. Most of that acreage was dedicated to potatoes and, considering the massive expansion of the New York City suburbs, it’s interesting to note that potato farms once extended as far west as the Nassau-Queens line. Long Island’s glacier runoff soil was perfectly suited for the growing of potatoes.

READ

08/04/17 5:20am
08/04/2017 5:20 AM

Councilman John Dunleavy’s attempt to circumvent the term-limit law passed last year predictably never gained any traction. When the Town Board approved term limits of 12 consecutive years for council members, it signaled the end of Mr. Dunleavy’s tenure; he was first elected in 2005. READ

07/28/17 5:55am
07/28/2017 5:55 AM

The history of voting rights in America is littered with obstacles and roadblocks.

It took until 1870, with the 15th Amendment, for African-American men to earn the right to vote. And even then, literacy tests and poll taxes were designed to suppress their vote. The 19th Amendment, granting voting rights to women, wasn’t adopted until 1920. The 24th Amendment, outlawing poll taxes, was passed in 1964. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 aimed to further solidify those rights for African Americans, nearly a full century after the 15th Amendment granted them.

READ