07/31/13 5:00pm
07/31/2013 5:00 PM
JAY SCHNEIDERMAN COURTESY RENDERING | The footbridge that would cross the Peconic River and connect Riverside to downtown Riverhead.

JAY SCHNEIDERMAN COURTESY RENDERING | The footbridge that would cross the Peconic River and connect Riverside to downtown Riverhead.

The Suffolk County Legislature voiced its support Tuesday of Southampton Town’s application for state funding to build a pedestrian footbridge that would span the Peconic River and connect Riverside to downtown Riverhead.

The resolution, which was approved 16-0, allows the recently acquired county parkland in Riverside to be used as the southern terminus for the proposed bridge, and authorizes the county to take whatever steps are needed to facilitate the bridge plan.

The northern part of the proposed bridge would begin near the Long Island Aquarium on the Riverhead Town side of the river, officials said.

Approvals from Southampton and Riverhead towns would ultimately be needed as well.

Southampton Town also has applied for a $50,000 county grant to make a walking trail from Flanders Road to the river, at a point where the bridge would begin.

The estimated cost of the bridge is $1.145 million, according to county Legislator Jay Schneiderman (I-Montauk), who sponsored the resolution. The state grant being sought allows the cost of land acquisition — which was already paid to the former property owner — to be used as a matching portion of the grant, so long as it was purchased in the past three years.

In this case, the $2.4 million land acquisition occurred in September of 2011, which puts it within that three-year window, and means that the entire $1.145 million cost of the bridge could be funded by the state grant if it is awarded for the project, Mr. Schneiderman said in an interview.

“It wouldn’t cost the county or the towns of Southampton or Riverhead anything,” he said.

The 14-acre parkland in question had been owned by Dede Gotthelf of Southampton, who had planned to built a hotel there, but her proposed plans got bogged down by environmental concerns and she sold the property to Suffolk.

The grant being sought has an Aug. 12 deadline for submission, so Mr. Schneiderman had to convince Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone to put the vote on the agenda through a certificate of necessity, allowing it to skip the committee process.

The Flanders Riverside and Northampton Community Association is already in support of the foot bridge, said Vince Taldone, the group’s president.

“We have these 14 acres that were acquired for parkland and now we’re looking to find what we can do with it,” he said. “How can we make the best use of it? Now is the time to start looking, because Southampton Town is seriously engaged in a revitalization effort for Riverside.”

The town has a Riverside economic development committee that is planning on issuing a request for proposals from developers with ideas on how to rebuild the beleaguered Riverside hamlet.

“We think one of the things that will make the area more attractive to investors is to have a beautiful park across the street” from a Main Street-like business district envisioned for Flanders Road, Mr. Taldone said in an interview.

“This would be a great addition to the kind of economic development and facelift we’re trying to bring to that area,” Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne Holst told the Legislature Tuesday. “It’s somewhat unique and a great attraction that would help both Riverhead and the Town of Southampton in the areas of Flanders and Riverside, which have been in some economic distress.”

Mr. Schneiderman recently unveiled a 3D computer graphic “vision” for Riverside at a FRNCA meeting, calling for the creation of a small downtown area near the traffic circle. The vision includes the walking trail and footbridge over the Peconic.

“I think this will become a landmark,” Mr. Schneiderman said of the proposed bridge. “People will get married on the bridge, and people will come to Riverhead just to walk on the bridge.”

EDITORIAL: RIVERSIDE PLAN WILL NEED MUCH SUPPORT

The legislator spent Wednesday measuring the height of the Route 105 bridge, which spans the Peconic River to the east, with some string he bought from Kmart to find out how tall the proposed footbridge would have to be.

At high tide, the Route 105 bridge was 27 feet above the water, so the Peconic River bridge would not need to be any taller than that in order to avoid obstructing boat traffic, Mr. Scheiderman said.

tgannon@timesreview.com

07/31/13 2:30pm
PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO |

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | A worker at ‘Variety’ cleaning up shattered glass Wednesday morning.

Someone threw a cinderblock through the front window of a Polish Town variety store early Wednesday, the third time in the last 18 months vandals have targeted the store.

The Hispanic variety store on the corner of Pulaski Street and Hamilton Avenue, simply called “Variety,” was targeted about 4 a.m., with the concrete block damaging the window and a TV that was in the window’s display area, an employee said.

Riverhead Town police said the vandalism caused about $800 worth of damage.

Detectives are investigating the incident, police said.

A worker at the variety store, who gave his name as Vic, was found sweeping up broken glass around the window Wednesday morning.

He said someone had also thrown a brick through the window about six months ago, and that robbers smashed through a window and looted the store in an incident another six months before that.

The man said other stores, like the Spanish and Polish delis on Pulaski Street, have also been victims of vandalism in recent years.

At a nearby clothing store, an employee said she’d seen problems before, with people urinating in the alleys between buildings, but said the store had never been damaged by vandals.

“That’s crazy,” said the employee, who did not give her name. “I’ve seen people on drugs, there’s some homeless people who stay around for a few days, but never anything like that.”

Jim Loo, owner of the Birchwood restaurant across the street, said he’s seen people leave broken or empty liquor bottles against his storefront, but said this was the first time he’s heard of someone throwing a cinderblock through a store.

“Nothing ever happened like that,” he said. ”Probably somebody was drunk or something.”

Mr. Loo, who said he’s been in the area for the past 12 years, said Polish Town has changed in that time, and not for the better.

“I’m sure that there are some good people left, it’s just late at night [when there are problems],” he said. “When people get drunk they do stupid things. The landscape of different people has really changed. It’s not really Polish town anymore.”

Mr. Loo said that while he walks his waitstaff to their cars now to make sure they make it home safely, he’s not too concerned.

“I’m just taking precaution steps,” he said.

psquire@timesreview.com

07/31/13 12:00pm

The Riverhead News-Review and RiverheadLOCAL.com are partnering with the Suffolk Theater to host a pair of Riverhead Town debates this election season.

The first event will be held Monday, Aug. 26, in advance of the Sept. 10 Republican primary for town council and the Democratic primary for town supervisor. All five candidates vying for the two posts have accepted an invitation to participate in the debate. The second debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 24, before the Nov. 5 general election.

“We’re very excited to be working together to bring these debates to the public,” said Times/Review Newsgroup executive editor Grant Parpan. “Given the current political climate in this town, there’s no doubt these events will be good shows worthy of the theater’s grand stage.”

Both debates will be moderated by Mr. Parpan, RiverheadLOCAL editor and publisher Denise Civiletti and News-Review editor Michael White.

“Riverhead is at a crossroads,” Ms. Civiletti said. “The next town board will be making crucial decisions that will affect our future for generations to come. Voters need to know where the candidates stand on important local issues.”

The Aug. 26 debate will feature Democratic supervisor candidates Ann Cotten-DeGrasse and Angela Devito, followed by Republican town council candidates Anthony Coates, John Dunleavy and Jodi Giglio,

All questions for the debates will be written in advance by the three moderators and the candidates will be given time to make closing statements. Readers can submit questions in advance to denise@riverheadlocal.com or mwhite@timesreview.com.

The events are scheduled for 7 p.m. and the theater will offer beverage service before and after the debates. The bar will open at 5 p.m.

Admission to the debates will be $5; all proceeds will be donated to a local charity.

07/31/13 11:06am

Howard T. Tuthill of Riverhead died July 30 at Good Samaritan Hospital in West Islip. He was 78 years old.

He was born Aug. 18, 1934, to Howard G. and Maryanne (Connell) Tuthill. He graduated with a two-year college degree and most recently worked as a switchman for New York Telephone Company. He also served in the U.S. Air Force.

Mr. Tuthill was predeceased by his son Steven in 1980. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth (née Biolsi); his sons Michael, of Missouri, and Christopher and Matthew, both of Queens; his daughters, Maria Murphy of Pennsylvania, Kathleen Foulk of Massachusetts and Andrea Johnson of Connecticut; his sisters, Josephine Garvey of Riverhead and Eileen Varanavage of Virginia; and 10 grandchildren.

The family will receive visitors Thursday, Aug. 1, from 7 to 9 p.m. and Friday, Aug. 2, from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. at Reginald H. Tuthill Funeral Home in Riverhead. A funeral service will take place Saturday, Aug. 3, at 9:30 a.m. at St. John the Evangelist R.C. Church in Riverhead, Father Larry Duncklee officiating. Interment weill follow at the church cemetery.

07/31/13 10:00am

GARRET MEADE FILE PHOTO | Chris Ujkic is seeking his seventh straight title in the Bob Wall Memorial Tennis Tournament.

Steve Paskiewicz earned a place in the men’s singles final of the Bob Wall Memorial Tennis Tournament with a 6-0, 6-1 semifinal defeat of No. 3 seed Richard Anderson. Paskiewicz will play the No. 1 seed Chris Ujkic in Saturday’s final at Robert W. Tasker Park in Peconic. Ujkic is seeking his seventh straight men’s singles championship and 19th title overall in the tournament.

The women’s singles final will pit Rosemary Krocke against Kate Freudenberg.

Richard Chizever will get a chance to defend his title in the men’s 50-plus singles division thanks to his 6-0, 6-0 semifinal win over No. 3 Tom Cahill. No. 4 John Czartosieski recovered to take down Andrezej Kopala in a three-setter, 5-7, 6-4, 6-2.

Saturday will be a busy day for Chizever. He will also play in the men’s 50-plus doubles final along with his partner, Bob Lum. The top-seeded pair will be matched against No. 2 Tom Cahill and Ed Lee. Chizever and Lum beat No. 4 Richard Brooks and Mark McDuffy, 6-0, 6-0, in the semifinals.

All of Saturday’s finals will be played at Robert W. Tasker Park, starting with the women’s singles final and the men’s 50-plus doubles match at 8 a.m. The men’s singles final is set for 10 a.m., with the men’s 50-plus singles contest to go at 11 a.m.

bliepa@timesreview.com

07/31/13 8:00am
PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Allied Building Supply is looking to move to land in an industrial subdivision owned by 1998 Peconic LLC, a group headed by Paul Elliot of Miller Place and Jim Miller of Southold. The property is just south of the Cinco de Mayo restaurant on Route 25.

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Allied Building Supply is looking to move to land in an industrial subdivision owned by 1998 Peconic LLC, just south of the Cinco de Mayo restaurant on Route 25.

Allied Building Products, whose representatives last month told the Riverhead Industrial Development Agency that the New Jersey company was torn between Calverton and Westhampton as the site for its first East End location, appears to have chosen Calverton.

Paul Elliott, part owner of 1998 Peconic LLC, said in an interview this week that Allied has signed a lease with that company. The lease is conditioned on the company’s receiving IDA tax incentives.

The incentives for which Allied and 1998 Peconic would qualify include sales tax abatements on the cost of building supplies, mortgage tax abatements and a property tax abatement on the value of improvements to the property that starts at 50 percent and decreases five percent per year over 10 years. The value of the land would not be subject to the abatement.

IDA members told Allied representatives July 8 that the board could not grant any abatement without a signed lease for the Calverton property. The next IDA meeting is Monday, Aug. 5, at 5 p.m.

Mr. Elliot, of Soundview Realty Group, owns 1998 Peconic LLC with Jim Miller of Miller Environmental Group Inc. 1998 Peconic has proposed building a 16,700-square-foot industrial facility on property on the east side of Edwards Avenue, north of Miller Environmental and south of Cinco de Mayo restaurant.

The Riverhead Planning Board is also scheduled to vote on a resolution Thursday night to approve the proposed commercial building, showroom and sales office that will be constructed for Allied Building Products, according to the Planning Board agenda. The building would be on a new road called Miller Way.

David Doran, Allied’s regional manager for New York, told the IDA on July 8 the company was considering either the Edwards Avenue site or a site in Westhampton near Gabreski Airport.

“Right now, we just want to see what our options are,” he said at the time.

The company will ultimately need 30,000 square feet but has an option to expand at the Edwards Avenue site, he said.

Allied Building Products is a family-owned building supply company that was started in Jersey City in 1950 and now has more than 180 locations across the country and over 3,100 employees, according to its website.

Allied would have six or seven employees at the Calverton site in the first year and “ramp it up quickly after that,” said Mr. Doran said. The company pays a “living wage” of more than $20 per hour, he told the IDA board last month.

He had also told the IDA that tax abatements were being offered at the Westhampton site as well, although it was unclear who was offering them. The Suffolk County IDA said it was not working with Allied Building Products, and Southampton Town doesn’t have an IDA.

Mr. Doran could not be reached for comment this week.

tgannon@timesreview.com

07/31/13 1:49am
ROBERT O'ROURK PHOTO | Shoreham-Wading River's Kerri Clark was involved in the give-and-go that led to Emily Sopko's goal.

ROBERT O’ROURK PHOTO | Shoreham-Wading River’s Kerri Clark was involved in the give-and-go that led to Emily Sopko’s goal.

The Shoreham-Wading River High School girls soccer coach, Adrian Gilmore, enjoyed a rare luxury in her team’s game against Miller Place  on Tuesday night. She was able to deploy a full starting 11 in the Town of Brookhaven Summer League playoff match at Diamond in the Pines in Coram.

Despite the opposition having three substitutes and the Wildcats none, Shoreham managed to secure a 1-0 victory, handing Miller Place (8-1-1) its first defeat of the summer and move into the quarterfinals.

For their previous game, a 2-0 victory over Port Jefferson, the Wildcats used only eight players.

“We always have no subs or play down a player,” midfielder Courtney Clasen said. “We play through it.”

The Wildcats (5-5) will play Sayville (9-1) at The Wedge in Mount Sinai on Thursday evening. Sayville, which recorded a 1-0 playoff win over Port Jefferson on Tuesday, defeated Shoreham during the regular season, 1-0.

“It’s going to be a tough game,” said Emily Sopko, who scored the lone goal in the win over Miller Place.

Gilmore agreed, saying Sayville was “a tough competitor. I didn’t have my goalie and we lost on a penalty kick. We’ll see what Thursday brings. I’m excited.”

“Again, I don’t remember having that many subs standing next to us,” Gilmore said, laughing.

ROBERT O'ROURK PHOTO | Theresa Bender of Shoreham-Wading River making a pass during her team's 1-0 playoff win over Miller Place.

ROBERT O’ROURK PHOTO | Theresa Bender of Shoreham-Wading River making a pass during her team’s 1-0 playoff win over Miller Place.

That has been a theme this summer for the Wildcats. Since the Brookhaven League does not demand mandatory attendance and players go on vacation and have summer jobs and other commitments, it’s not unusual for teams to field shorthanded teams.

Shoreham had to forfeit one game at Sachem because only six girls showed up.

“We had to drive all the way to Sachem,” goalkeeper Kelly Wynkoop said. “It was pouring rain. There was only six of us huddled under an umbrella. It’s always we don’t have enough girls. We have the talent, it’s just people have other things going on and they can’t show up.”

When Tuesday’s game kicked off, Shoreham had all of its players in the starting lineup. Miller Place had three players on the bench and its coach substituted freely.

Because there were no substitutes available, every Shoreham player knew she would have to go the full 60 minutes in the game of two 30-minute halves. In fact, the Wildcats were forced to go down to 10 players early in the second half when Taylor Chaimowitz was taken out for six minutes after sustaining an ankle injury.

“I just play until I know it’s over,” said Clasen, a three-sport star who also competes in basketball and track. “I don’t really think about it. I just play. If I’m dying, I just think, ‘Well if we win this we go on.’ ”

Added Sopko: “We just think about winning the game and moving forward in the season. We think about the season coming up. We just hope that we’re this good.”

Shoreham was missing three starters who were on vacation — sweeper Kate Birkmire, striker Megan Kelly, who has been tied as the league’s leading goal scorer, and incoming freshman Alexandra Kuhnie.

But the Wildcats came through. Wynkoop grabbed everything that was shot or sent her way. Clasen set the pace in the midfield and Sopko tallied midway through the opening half.

“They do a great job of possessing the ball, playing to feet and I think a difference tonight, just playing smart,” Gilmore said.

Sopko broke the deadlock with 14 minutes 9 seconds remaining in the first half as she scored inside the penalty area on a give-and-go with Kerri Clark.

Sopko admitted she did not remember much about her goal. “When I shoot and score, I don’t really think about it,” she said. “I just worry about getting the ball into the back of the net.”

Last season the Wildcats struggled at times, dropping several games by a goal. But given a promising talent pool and the encouraging summer results, Gilmore was optimistic for the fall as she walked off the artificial turf field on a beautiful summer night.

“It’s a good indicator of how they look for the fall and our JV team is in first place for summer league also, so that just speaks for the talent that’s coming up throughout the program,” she said.

07/30/13 8:00pm
07/30/2013 8:00 PM
GARRET MEADE PHOTO | Jake Farr completed the season with a .310 batting average, tying him with Riverhead teammate Michael Brosseau for seventh in the league.

GARRET MEADE PHOTO | Jake Farr completed the season with a .310 batting average, tying him with Riverhead teammate Michael Brosseau for seventh in the league.

Jake Farr is the type of baseball player that Teddy Roosevelt would have appreciated. He speaks softly and carries a big stick.

It wasn’t a surprise that Farr hit over .300 this summer for the Riverhead Tomcats. That was to be expected of the good-hitting second baseman from Strawberry Plains, Tenn. What wasn’t expected, however, was the slow start Farr made to the Hamptons Collegiate Baseball League season.

“I didn’t get a hit like the first four or five games,” he said. “I was like 0 for 10 or something. Crazy.”

Tomcats manager Randy Caden noticed some things in Farr’s swing and worked with him for a couple of days at Caden’s Long Island Mariners Sports Facility in Bohemia. Farr said he began putting more weight on his front toe and that led to him feeling more balanced at the plate. It also helps that Farr, who throws right-handed but bats left-handed, is proficient at hitting to the opposite field.

The results speak for themselves. Farr finished the season with a .310 batting average, tying him with teammate Michael Brosseau for seventh in the league, which uses wood bats. He also drove in 18 runs, scored 25 runs, walked 21 times and stole three bases.

This was the first time Farr had played extensively with wood bats. Like many college players, he was swinging aluminum in his recent freshman season for Walters State Community College (Tenn.). Using wood to find hits is more difficult.

“The sweet spot’s a lot smaller with the wood,” Farr said. “I like it. At first I was a little bit intimidated because I didn’t know how I was going to do with it, but now, you know, it feels right. It makes you feel a lot better when you get a hit with a wood bat.”

Farr found that sweet spot often enough to help the Tomcats’ offense.

“He’s a tough out, good eye, and he’s been able to make contact with good pitchers, keep us in games,” said Caden.

Farr said hitting is his strength. In high school he was an all-state player in 2012 with an extraordinary .498 batting average. He led the state with 24 doubles.

Confidence is a big thing for a batter, and Farr should have no shortage of it after the way he performed against some tough pitchers in the HCBL.

“I’ve been really focusing on my timing a lot,” he said. “A lot of it is confidence. If you’re feeling good, you can hit them off the end and drop them in and stuff. When you’re feeling bad, man, it seems like nothing drops in.”

That confidence could come in handy for Farr, who wants to go far in baseball. He has one more year to go at Walters State. He hopes to receive an offer to play for an NCAA Division I school and be drafted by a major league club. His numbers should help draw the attention of some Division I teams.

“They always look for offense,” said Caden.

As a defensive player, Farr had to become accustomed to charging slow rollers off wood bats, something college players don’t have to worry about too often with aluminum bats.

“That’s the big adjustment for a lot of these guys,” Caden said. “I would say he’s an average second baseman. He’s not bad, but he’s average.”

Caden raved about Farr as a person.

“Great kid, a great team ballplayer,” the manager said. “I think he’s said seven words the whole year, that’s just cheering for his team. [He] works hard. A coach wants this type of kid on a team.”

Having grown up outside of Knoxville, Tenn., in a state that doesn’t have beaches, Farr took the opportunity this summer to visit Long Island beaches in his free time.

“I’ve had a great time,” he said. “Too bad we didn’t make the playoffs, though. I was hoping to stay a little bit longer.”

bliepa@timesreview.com