06/13/13 6:13pm
06/13/2013 6:13 PM
Broidy in Reeves Park

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | The land just west of Park Road/Thomas Kelly Memorial Drive that nearby Reeves Park residents have wanted to see preserved.

Two Riverhead Town Board members who oppose a plan by Suffolk County to purchase 15 acres of land on Sound Avenue as open space now say they would support  a move by the county to preserve the property as farmland instead.

But county officials say such a move would require the entire potential acquisition process to start again, with no guarantees the county will be making any offers on the land.

Council members Jodi Giglio and George Gabrielsen sent a letter to county Legislator Al Krupski (D-Cutchogue) Thursday voicing their support for preservation of the land as farmland, rather than open space.

Under the county’s farmland preservation program,  the county would buy what’s called development rights and the land could only be used for agriculture in the future.

“The property being preserved as parkland would require taking the entire property out of farming permanently and would not only require use of town Community Preservation Fund funds, which have been depleted in recent years, but also ongoing maintenance of the park with town resources, on behalf of all Suffolk County residents,” reads the letter, which was also sent to the News-Review.

The councilpeople say it is more desirable to preserve the land as farmland, which would be “in keeping with the rural character of Sound Avenue and would support the Scenic Rural Historic Corridor.”

The land in question is just shy of 15 acres of farmland stretching north from the northwest corner of Park Road (also called Thomas Kelly Memorial Drive) and Sound Avenue.

[See interactive map below]

It is owned by Ed Broidy, a developer whose Boom Development company first proposed a commercial shopping center at the site in 2003, a plan that met with community opposition.

When the town rezoned the property to residential uses in the mid-2000s, Mr. Broidy sued, but later offered a settlement in which he would develop the land residentially, with one seven-acre farm and 16 residential lots on the remainder of the land.

The county later proposed to acquire the land as open space under the “active recreation” section of the voter-approved drinking water protection program, for use as a fitness trail. However, that section of the program requires that a town or private entity act as a partner to manage the recreation use, and submit a plan to do so beforehand.

Riverhead Town officials estimated the cost of creating the fitness trail at about $70,000, and council members Gabrielsen and Giglio opposed doing so, saying at a recent public Town Board work session the town doesn’t have the money.

Without the support of Ms. Giglio or Mr. Gabrielsen, and since Supervisor Sean Walter once represented Mr. Broidy as his attorney and recused himself from the discussion, the Town Board wouldn’t have three votes to support of the acquisition.

That would mean the county could not proceed in purchasing the parcel.

Mr. Krupski, whose district spans the North Fork, said Friday that he plans to speak with Mr. Broidy next week, but he said preserving the land as farmland would require a whole new process be started at the county level.

On the other hand, he said, the alternative could be that the land isn’t preserved at all.

The acquisition of the farmland development rights also would require that the land be farmed, and Mr. Broidy has indicated in the past that he is not interested in doing that.

There currently is no application with the county for the purchase of the farmland development rights on the Broidy parcel, officials say.

Mr. Broidy could not immediately be reached for comment.

Long Island Pine Barrens Society executive director Richard Amper has been critical of the two council member’s opposition to the park purchase.

“It’s properly purchased as open space,” he said Friday. “The county approved the purchase on the basis of its suitability for trails and recreation. The county got it right, Gabrielsen and Giglio have it wrong. Development rights are purchased only with the expectation that the land owner is going to continue to farm the land.

“That’s not going to happen here.”

Mr. Amper said the purchase would be “a gift from the county…why don’t they just say ‘thank you?”

tgannon@timesreview.com


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05/11/13 12:00pm
05/11/2013 12:00 PM
TIM KELLY PHOTO | Sean Walter 'surrenders' to Al Krupski at the Dark Horse on election night Tuesday.

TIM KELLY FILE PHOTO | Riverhead Supervisor Sean Walter conceding the special county legislative election to Al Krupski (left) in January.

If the Republican Party puts up a challenger to County Legislator Al Krupski in November, chances are that person won’t live on the North Fork.

With the county GOP’s nominating convention only days away, the party’s Riverhead and Southold town leaders say they know of no one willing to stand against the popular Democrat, who in January handily beat Riverhead Town Supervisor Sean Walter to fill the seat left vacant when Ed Romaine was elected Brookhaven town supervisor.

Mr. Krupski’s victory, 6,561 votes to 3,182, a margin of 67 percent to Mr. Walter’s 33 percent, prompted the supervisor in conceding to say, “You stomped me bad.” Prior to the vote, GOP leaders said they needed a candidate with significant name recognition, such as an elected official, to run a competitive campaign against Mr. Krupski, who had served in town government for 28 years.

In advance of the party’s May 14 county nominating convention, Republican leaders were scheduled to meet Wednesday to consider potential candidates for the legislative contests and the State Assembly seat left vacant when Dan Losquadro won a special election in March for the Brookhaven highway superintendent’s post.

Regarding the upcoming Krupski race, Brookhaven GOP leader Jesse Garcia deferred to Suffolk GOP Chairman John Jay LaValle, who said his party does not want to forgo the challenge.

“We do have a couple of people looking at it and we’re in discussions with them right now,” Mr. LaValle said on Monday. “We have to run a candidate. I feel pretty strong about that.”

Southold GOP leader Peter McGreevy said no thought was given to cross-endorsing Mr. Krupski, who ran with Republican support in one of his Town Trustee elections.

Suffolk Democrats will hold their convention on Monday, May 20.

Both parties have interviewed numerous potential candidates for the 2nd Assembly District seat, left vacant by Mr. Losquadro. The district covers Riverhead, Southold and a large section of northeastern Brookhaven.

Democrats under consideration include Jim Waters of Waters Crest Winery in Cutchogue and Jennifer Maertz of Rocky Point, who ran unsuccessfully against State Senator Ken LaValle in 2010.

The list of potential GOP candidates includes Southold Councilman Chris Talbot and former Romaine aide Bill Faulk of Manorville.

tkelly@timesreview.com

05/06/13 6:00am
05/06/2013 6:00 AM

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | A vote to expand Sunday bus service is expected to take place at the County Legislature’s general meeting May 7 in Hauppauge.

Suffolk Legislator Jay Schneiderman (I-Montauk) and Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone are rolling out new legislation aimed at bringing year-round Sunday bus service to the East End. The measure would extend service for the S92 and 10C routes.

The proposed expansion comes on the heels of a pilot program launched two years ago that introduced Sunday and holiday service from Memorial Day through Columbus Day, according to Mr. Schneiderman.

New York State recently increased funding for Suffolk transit, giving the county the opportunity to provide Sunday bus service year-round, officials said. The legislation allocates $1.1 million additional state funding toward expanding the service.

In addition to the state-provided funds, the legislation would also direct the county Department of Public Works to apply for federal matching grant funding through the Job Access Reverse Commute program, with the goal of receiving more than $2 million to cover the cost of the expansion.

The measure is co-sponsored by Legislator Al Krupski (D-Cutchogue).

“Many businesses on the East End, including in my North Fork legislative district, rely on public transportation to get workers to their jobs, especially during the summer season,” Mr. Krupski said in a press release issued this week.

Aside from the benefits the additional service could provide residents, officials say the new legislation could potentially bring environmental and economic improvements to the county.

“This resolution is a step forward to expand bus service while cutting our deficit,” Mr. Bellone said in a statement. “Expanding bus service helps take cars off the road and provides opportunity and access for thousands of Suffolk County residents.”

The bill, which has already passed the Legislature’s public works and transportation committee, will be voted on Tuesday during the county Legislature’s general meeting in Hauppauge.

If approved, the plan would be continued as a pilot program for one year. The Department of Public Works would then be required to report on the success of the pilot program to base the feasibility of continuing the program beyond the one-year pilot period.

cmurray@timesreview.com

01/29/13 3:52pm
01/29/2013 3:52 PM

The first person Legislator Al Krupski placed on his staff since taking office last week may be new to the intricacies of county government, but he’s no stranger to public service or the business world.

Mr. Krupski chose John Stype, a senior partner in the Neefus Stype Agency, an insurance and financial planning company, as his legislative aide.

“The reason I asked him to help me is I needed someone who knows the district and someone I can trust completely,” Mr. Krupski said.

The two have been friends for years. During the busy harvest season, Mr. Stype has helped out at the Krupski family pumpkin farm in Peconic by driving the hayride tractor.

“I have confidence that I could send John anywhere and he could represent the district well,” Mr. Krupski said. “With me just starting out, that’s important.

Mr. Stype is a member of Southold Town’s Economic Advisory Council, created to strengthen the sometimes strained relations between the town and area merchants. That’s based largely on a perception held by some that town building codes and the permit review process is often lengthy and cumbersome and so anti-business.

Southold Supervisor Scott Russell believes the new legislator made a good choice in hiring Mr. Stype, but fears the town could lose the benefits of his experience and business acumen.

“John is a key part of my Economic Advisory Council and I certainly hope he stays in some capacity,” the supervisor said. “If he has to curtail his role to some extent given his new responsibilities I would understand that. He’s been an absolutely outstanding member.”

tkelly@timesreview.com

01/28/13 5:48pm
01/28/2013 5:48 PM

TIM GANNON FILE PHOTO | Suffolk County envisions turning the North Fork Preserve in Northville into Suffolk’s last great county park.

The Suffolk County Legislature will take up the purchase of the final three acres of the North Fork Preserve at its Feb. 5 meeting,  where newly elected North Fork Legislator Al Krupski (D-Cutchogue) has submitted a bill to acquire the land for $702,000.

The bulk of the property, two parcels totaling 314 acres, were purchased by the county in 2011 for $18.3 million. The county plans to create a public park on the land, with the 133-acre northern section being left undeveloped for use as passive recreation like hiking or horseback riding, and the southern portion being used for more active recreation like camping, tennis and basketball.

The three acres still to be acquired contain three existing structures on them, which will be used by the Suffolk County Parks Department for a caretaker residence and check-in station, a barn for parks maintenance equipment and a garage for park maintenance equipment and a with a small office area for parks personnel, according to Mr. Krupski, who co-sponsoring the bill with County Executive Steve Bellone (D-Babylon).

“The North Fork Preserve property is a critical open space acquisition for Riverhead, the North Fork and all of Suffolk County,” Mr. Krupski said in a press release. “The North Fork Preserve has been called ‘Suffolk’s last great park’ and I agree with that description. The park, with fishing, hiking, camping and more, will be a highlight of the entire Suffolk County park system.”

tgannon@timesreview.com

01/22/13 5:32pm
01/22/2013 5:32 PM

Krupski-copy

With the Suffolk County Board of Elections certifying his Jan. 15 special election victory Tuesday, Al Krupski will be sworn in as the county legislator for the North Fork and Shelter Island at the County Center in Riverhead on Wednesday.

Mr. Krupski said he expects a quick, no-frills event when he takes his oath in the County Clerk’s office at 11 a.m.

The Southold Democrat will step into the office previously held by Ed Romaine, a Center Moriches Republican. With Mr. Romaine’s election in November to Brookhaven Town supervisor, Mr. Krupski will serve the 11-plus months left in Mr. Romaine’s term.

He already took possession of his predecessor’s legislative office in the Cooperative Extension building in Riverhead.

Mr. Krupski, who is leaving his Southold Town Board seat, handily defeated Republican Riverhead Supervisor Sean Walter in the Jan. 15 special election. His two-to-one victory margin was the highest of any special election held in Suffolk over the past decade.

tkelly@timesreview.com

01/20/13 2:30pm
01/20/2013 2:30 PM
TIM KELLY FILE PHOTO | Sean Walter ‘surrenders’ to Al Krupski at the Dark Horse on election night Tuesday.

TIM KELLY FILE PHOTO | Sean Walter ‘surrenders’ to Al Krupski at the Dark Horse on election night Tuesday.

Tuesday’s landslide special election victory by Suffolk County Legislator-elect Al Krupski over Riverhead Town Supervisor Sean Walter provided some interesting statistics for political junkies to chew on.

We broke down several facts and figures compiled from the preliminary election results:

• Mr. Krupski won with 6,561 votes to 3,182 for Mr. Walter. That’s a split of 67 percent to 33 percent, the highest percentage victory in the last decade for any special election held in Suffolk County.

• While voter turnout was only about 16 percent in the legislative district, 24 percent of registered voters in Southold Town showed up at the polls Tuesday. Turnout in Mr. Walter’s hometown of Riverhead was just under 17 percent. Voter turnout was particularly low in Brookhaven, where only 1,754 votes were cast, just an 8 percent turnout.

• The only election districts Mr. Walter won in his hometown of Riverhead were in Glenwood Village; along West Main Street, where only 34 votes were cast; and in Calverton, where he prevailed by just one vote.

• Mr. Walter fared best in Brookhaven Town, where he received 48 percent of the vote. He received 43 percent of the vote in Riverhead, 30 percent on Shelter Island  and only 17 percent in Southold.

• Mr. Krupski received a higher percentage of the vote than all but five county legislators who faced opposition in the 2011 general election.

• Mr. Krupski also received a higher percentage of the vote than his predecessor, Ed Romaine, did his inaugural 1st District legislative campaign in 2005, when he received 63 percent of the vote even with a long history in county government.

• Mr. Walter received a total of 3,182 votes, about 1,700 fewer than he received in his previous supervisor run, even though almost 2,000 more people voted in this election.

01/17/13 5:00pm
01/17/2013 5:00 PM

TIM KELLY FILE PHOTO | Al Krupski taking the oath of office from Southold Justice Rudy Bruer in Jan. 2009 following what turned out to be his last town election victory.

It’s been less than two days since Al Krupski won a lopsided victory to become the North Fork’s county legislator-elect, but he already has committee assignments and a new office. And he knows there’s a lot more ahead as he says farewell to the Southold Town Board and hello to the Suffolk County Legislature.

Mr. Krupski will take the oath of office next Thursday, Jan. 24 — where has yet to be determined — with his term officially beginning on Friday. First, however, there’s the business of the county Board of Elections certifying the election results. The BOE is already into the “recanvassing,” the standard post-election review of all the ballots, and could declare Mr. Krupski the winner sometime next week, said James Anthony, assistant to Democratic Commissioner Anita Katz.

He’s filling a vacancy, which means his office has to be up and running in a matter of days. Since the county owns the Cooperative Extension headquarters building on Griffing Avenue in Riverhead, he’ll take over the office space of his predecessor, Ed Romaine, vacated after his election as Brookhaven Town Supervisor.

Next up is the often politically tricky task of filling his staff.

When his title changes to Legislator Krupski, the Peconic pumpkin farmer will serve on the budget, finance information and technology committee, public works and transportation, health and human services and, of course, the environment, planning and agriculture panel.

“I feel like I have a week to breathe then do a few things at home and I’ll be ready to go,” Mr. Krupski said.

The Legislature’s next meeting is scheduled for Feb. 5. A ceremonial swearing in will likely be held on that date.

tkelly@timesreview.com