04/09/14 4:36pm
04/09/2014 4:36 PM
Lloyd Corwin, 80, watches as his grandson Blake gingerly tears down the old Purina feeds storage tower which was built from clay tiles and has deteriorated over the years since it was constructed after World War II next to the Crescent Duck Farm in Aquebogue. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

Lloyd Corwin, 80, watches as his grandson Blake gingerly tears down the old Purina feeds storage tower which was built from clay tiles and has deteriorated over the years since it was constructed after World War II next to the Crescent Duck Farm in Aquebogue. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

The feed silos at the Crescent Duck Farm in Aquebogue are coming down.

The structures were built shortly after World War II by Purina to provide feed for various duck farms in the area, according to Lloyd Corwin.

Feed was delivered by rail at the time, he said. But over time, the Purina sign simply fell off the silo.

“We can’t remember when it came down,” said his son Jeff.

“The silos haven’t been used since the early 1960s and they’ve been slowly falling down,” said Doug, another of Lloyd’s sons, who is now president of Crescent Duck Farm.

The silos were further damaged in Hurricane Sandy, he said.

The silos aren’t coming down implosion-stye but rather, piece by piece by the Corwins.

It had heavy motors and gear boxes at the top of it that presented a danger as the structures weakened, and it has a feed elevator in the middle. Those had been removed by Wednesday morning.

Doug Corwin said they’ve had a demolition permit for more than a year and finally decided to begin taking the silos down.

“I hate to see it go, but I don’t want to see anybody get hurt,” Doug Corwin said.

04/07/14 9:34am
04/07/2014 9:34 AM

An Aquebogue man said an armed burglar broke into his window early this morning and stole $8 in cash from his wallet.

The victim, a Zion Street resident, said that about 4:40 a.m., someone opened his bedroom window, reached inside his front pants pocket, took the money and displayed “some sort of dark colored handgun before fleeing the area in an unknown direction.”

Police are looking for any information anyone may have about the incident. Those who may have seen something can call Detective Hobson at 631-727-4500, ext. 377.

Riverhead police cops

02/06/14 12:00pm
02/06/2014 12:00 PM

Aela Bailey is a third-grade student at Aquebogue Elementary School.

The Jamesport Meeting House is extremely pleased to announce that the 2014 season will begin with a performance by the Cassatt String Quartet on March 1 at 7:30 p.m. The program will feature the Dmitri Shostakovich Quartet No. 8, the Maurice Ravel String Quartet and Antonin Dvorak’s Cypresses. (more…)

11/27/13 9:56am
11/27/2013 9:56 AM
RACHEL YOUNG PHOTO | Two people were taken to Peconic Bay Medical Center Wednesday morning after a sedan rear-ended an SUV in Aquebogue.

RACHEL YOUNG PHOTO | Two people were taken to Peconic Bay Medical Center Wednesday morning after a sedan rear-ended an SUV in Aquebogue.

Riverhead Police said two people were taken to Peconic Bay Medical Center for precautionary purposes when a man driving a Volkswagen Passat rear-ended a woman driving a Honda CR-V near the intersection of Main Road and Union Avenue in Aquebogue at 9 a.m. this morning.

An officer at the scene of the collision said the driver of the Honda CR-V was waiting to make a left turn onto Union Avenue when the driver of the Volkswagen Passat glanced down to pick up his coffee and rear-ended the Honda CR-V.

Neither driver was injured in the collision, Riverhead Police said.

Traffic was moving well at the scene of the crash at 9:30 a.m.

ryoung@timesreview.com

11/24/13 2:00pm
11/24/2013 2:00 PM
RACHEL YOUNG PHOTO

RACHEL YOUNG PHOTO | Allison Rappa works at her home studio in Aquebogue.

During a recent evening in the makeshift beauty studio located on the second floor of her Aquebogue home, Allison Rappa was hard at work applying a full set of silk eyelash extensions to a female client.

“I feel like I’m performing surgery,” Ms. Rappa joked as she used special tweezers to dip the silk eyelashes into a medical-grade adhesive before gluing them onto her client’s eyes at a ratio of one synthetic lash to one natural lash.

“There’s a lot to know when doing lashes,” she said of the process, which gives clients the look of mascara, no effort required. “It’s not just grabbing a lash and sticking them on. It’s very meticulous.”

The increasing popularity of eyelash extensions, whose legions of followers reportedly include the eternally doe-eyed Kim Kardashian and pop singer Katy Perry, is one of the reasons Ms. Rappa, a licensed cosmetologist, has decided to launch The Beauty Bar, a new spa she plans to open in Southold by the end of this month.

Located in a roughly 1,200-square-foot space above Salone Dei Capelli on Main Road, in what was previously a psychiatrist’s office, The Beauty Bar, Ms. Rappa said, will offer customers a variety of cosmetic and therapeutic services, including eyelash extensions, professional makeup application, waxing, facials, body wraps and massage therapy.

In addition, Ms. Rappa said, her friend Michael DeRosa, a nurse practitioner, will likely stop into The Beauty Bar once or twice a month to give clients injectable facial fillers like Botox and Juvéderm.

“Minimally invasive procedures are in great demand ,” Mr. DeRosa said of the popularity of facial fillers.

As for Ms. Rappa, whom Mr. DeRosa has known for years, “she’s somebody who knows what patients and clients need,” he said.

For nearly seven years, Ms. Rappa, 34, has operated her small business, Artistry by Allie, out of her home in Aquebogue, where she lives with her husband, Adrian Feliciano, owner of My Butcher in Wading River, and her two children.

“I definitely outgrew my home,” Ms. Rappa said of her decision to open a separate business in Southold, an area where she said a fair number of her current clients live. Ms. Rappa said she’s currently on the lookout for a nail technician and certified aesthetician.

“I wanted a space where I could have a store that everybody could come to for services,” she said of the new location.

A lifelong Suffolk County resident, Ms. Rappa studied makeup artistry at the New York and Los Angeles campuses of Make-up Designory, a professional makeup school. She was trained in eyelash extension application by NovaLash, a leader in the burgeoning lash extension industry.

“Lash extensions are probably the most innovative new technique in the beauty industry,” Ms. Rap-pa said. “You don’t need makeup and you can throw away your mascara. You basically wake up looking beautiful.”

“I’m into beauty,” she added. “I love bringing out everybody’s features.”

“She’s very familiar with the face, and aesthetics,” Mr. DeRosa said of Ms. Rappa. “It’s exciting to see somebody like that opening a business to serve our community.”

ryoung@timesreview.com

10/13/13 1:00pm
10/13/2013 1:00 PM
PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Volunteers with the community advocacy group Save Main Road work on restoring the Witch's Hat in Aquebogue Saturday afternoon.

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Volunteers with the community advocacy group Save Main Road work on restoring the Witch’s Hat in Aquebogue Saturday afternoon.

Just in time for Halloween, Aquebogue’s historic “Witch’s Hat” got a bit of a touchup Saturday afternoon.

Volunteers with the community group “Save Main Road” spent the afternoon pulling off old shingles, clearing out debris and throwing away garbage as part of the ongoing restoration to the former roadside stand.

The Witch’s Hat — so called because of its pointed roof and strange shape — was built in 1927, and once sold gas, candy and cigarettes to drivers. The building was named a town landmark in 1987, but had fallen into disrepair.

Earlier this month, Jamesport-based landscape company Kaiser Maintenance cleared away trees at the building’s site. On Saturday, volunteers began to clean away years worth of rotted shingles and dirt that accumulated on the structure.

As some used hammer to tear away at the pine wood on the roof, other volunteers dove inside the Hat, and turned up an old pice sign and a wooden piece of artwork buried in the dust. Next Saturday, volunteers will return to the Hat to finish the job, so that the scope of the renovations to restore the building can be completed.

psquire@timesreview.com