04/08/15 8:00am
04/08/2015 8:00 AM
Eugene Lafurno's home two years ago in Baiting Hollow. (Credit: Paul Squire)

Eugene Lafurno’s home two years ago in Baiting Hollow. (Credit: Paul Squire)

Times up for “The Epiphany.”

Eugene Lafurno of Baiting Hollow has been building what town officials call a third and fourth story onto his Founders Path home for several years, and town officials say it’s unsafe and was built without proper permits.

On Tuesday, the Riverhead Town Board approved a resolution to have the town engineering department remove the structure and is expected to charge Mr. Lafurno with demolition costs.

(more…)

04/06/15 10:14am
A police officer closes off Sound Avenue during the investigation Sunday afternoon. (Credit: Joe Werkmeister)

A police officer closes off Sound Avenue during the investigation Sunday afternoon. (Credit: Joe Werkmeister)

Update: The 48-year-old Hampton Bays man stabbed in what police described as an Easter Sunday ‘road rage’ incident on Sound Avenue is in fair condition at Stony Brook University Hospital, a hospital spokeswoman said.

Brett Penny, 48, of Hampton Bays was allegedly stabbed in the chest by Michael Doroski, 25, of Wading River, after both men stopped their vehicles between Fresh Pond Road and Edwards Avenue in Baiting Hollow about 3:30 p.m., police said.

Mr. Doroski was charged with second degree assault and was expected to face a judge in Riverhead Town Justice Court Monday morning.

Original story: A 25-year-old Wading River man is facing an assault charge after stabbing another man during an alleged road rage incident on Sound Avenue Sunday afternoon, Riverhead Police said.

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04/02/15 12:00pm
04/02/2015 12:00 PM
John King describes a proposed cider mill at Grapes and Greens

John King describes a proposed cider mill at Grapes and Greens. (Credit: Tim Gannon)

Will a hard cider mill inside the Grapes and Greens distribution center on Sound Avenue result in a nightclub-like atmosphere, denigrating the quality of lives of its neighbors?

That’s the fear of some of those neighbors, who came out to a meeting Thursday to protest a proposal to create a 38,000 square-foot cider-making facility inside the 108,000 square-foot building that once housed Blackman Plumbing and in 2012 was converted into the Grapes and Greens “agri-park” facility with $500,000 in funding from the New York State Economic Development Council.

However vacant space remains at the building; the application in front of the Planning Board calls for making alcoholic cider, with bottling and tasting onsite.

(more…)

12/24/14 2:25pm
12/24/2014 2:25 PM

Screen Shot 2014-12-24 at 2.29.07 PMA Riverhead man was arrested after police said he stole a saw, a checkbook and other personal items from an unlocked car in Baiting Hollow.

According to police, a resident on Baiting Hollow Lane reported on Tuesday shortly after 9 a.m. that someone had stolen several items from a car overnight. Those items included a Milwaukee circular saw and a briefcase, which included a checkbook and personal documents.

Police said they received information that led them to 25-year-old Edgar Jonathan Castillo of Zdunko Lane.

He was charged with petit larceny, a misdemeanor.

08/08/14 10:00am
08/08/2014 10:00 AM
An application by the Department of Environmental Conservation for a four-car parking lot at the end of Beach Way, a private road in Baiting Hollow, has prompted nearby homeowners to sue the state agency. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

An application by the Department of Environmental Conservation for a four-car parking lot at the end of Beach Way, a private road in Baiting Hollow, has prompted nearby homeowners to sue the state agency. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

In a town awash with thousands of parking spaces, an application for another four might not seem like that big of a deal.

But tucked away on the far side of a private road in Baiting Hollow, abutting land the New York State Department of State has labeled “irreplaceable,” four parking spaces the state Department of Environmental Conservation permitted itself last year are creating quite a stir.

A group of Baiting Hollow homeowners have taken the DEC to court over the proposed spaces, claiming the state regulatory authority went out of bounds in granting itself a tidal wetlands permit for the spots “in secret — free from any public awareness and scrutiny,” according to court filings.

“If I wanted to build on that DEC piece of property, they would make me go through a full environmental review of the impacts,” said Frank Isler, the Riverhead attorney representing the Baiting Hollow Beach Association. “It’s surprising to us that they didn’t do that themselves. And our argument is that they can’t benefit from mishandling a procedure incorrectly.”

Last summer, the DEC filed for — and approved — four parking spaces in a .2-acre lot at the west end of Beach Way, a private road at the end of Edwards Avenue overlooking the Long Island Sound. The application calls for the removal of approximately 100 cubic yards of sand to be replaced with pervious material to facilitate car use. In addition, it proposes removing an existing gate on the site and installing guard rails along the perimeter of the parking area.

The .2-acre site abuts a larger, 81-acre parcel also owned by the DEC — land the agency says it wants to open to the public. In 2005, those lands, called the Baiting Hollow Wetlands and Beach, were added to a list of “significant coastal fish and wildlife habitats” by New York State’s Department of State.

“Any activity that would disturb or eliminate marsh, natural beach, and duneland plant communities would result in a loss of valuable wildlife species,” the designation states. The 81-acre property — one of about 250 such areas statewide — is considered “an important nesting site” for the endangered piping plover and the threatened least tern, according to the DOS.

But members of the Baiting Hollow Beach Association argue that the DEC’s application ignored that designation. And because the application was deemed to have a minor impact on the environment, notification otherwise required was not given, and neighbors were unaware of the permit until weeks after it was filed. One homeowner, Roger Schilling, said he heard about the permit in passing as he tried to obtain repair permits for his own property.

But by then, it was too late to challenge the DEC’s permit, as a 30-day window had already passed by the time homeowners filed suit.

“As soon as we heard about it, we brought [the legal challenge,]” Mr. Isler said.

Mr. Schilling said the project would require some “major dune bulldozing” to clear land for the parking spaces.

“Part of that dune is what saves the back row of houses [on Beach Way] from flooding,” he said. “That’s why this is one of the things that infuriates us, by calling it a minor project. It’s a major project.”