12/15/14 8:00am
12/15/2014 8:00 AM
(Credit: Bill Landon)

Neverson Funn goes up for a shot in Saturday’s alumni basketball game in Riverhead. (Credit: Bill Landon)

It had been 11 years since the last time Chris Harris stepped onto the court at Riverhead High School. A lot has changed since then. But the competitive juices remain.

“Coach got some of us old guys out here,” said Harris, a 2002 Riverhead graduate.  (more…)

09/17/14 5:00am
09/17/2014 5:00 AM
The Harlem Wizards pose with Riverhead faculty members at last year's game. (Credit: Riverhead School District)

The Harlem Wizards pose with Riverhead faculty members at last year’s game. (Credit: Riverhead School District)

The Harlem Wizards basketball team will return to Riverhead High School Nov. 19 and the Riverhead Central Faculty Association is currently seeking sponsorships for the event that attracted more than 1,000 people last year.  (more…)

07/01/14 5:00pm
07/01/2014 5:00 PM
NBA guard Nate Robinson poses for a picture during Tuesday's camp at McGann-Mercy High School. (Credit: Joe Werkmeister)

NBA guard Nate Robinson poses for a picture during Tuesday’s camp at McGann-Mercy High School. (Credit: Joe Werkmeister)

Among the jerseys on display Tuesday at McGann-Mercy High School were the mainstays of the NBA: LeBron James, Kevin Durant, Carmelo Anthony. Some of the kids went old-school, wearing the likes of John Stockton’s Utah Jazz jersey and Glen Rice’s Charlotte Hornets jersey.

One boy wore the jersey representing the man of the hour: Nate Robinson.  (more…)

08/11/13 8:00am
08/11/2013 8:00 AM

ROBERT O”ROURK PHOTO | The Stop the Violence Basketball Tournament at the Horton Avenue court featured some intense competition Saturday.

There’s a unique bond formed between players on a basketball court. During a game — even in the heat of competition — players can develop a respect for one another.

It’s that thinking that led Riverhead residents Dwayne Eleazer and Larry Williams to create the Stop the Violence Basketball Tournament. Now in its seventh year, the tournament has blossomed into an annual showcase of outstanding basketball — all in the hopes of bringing the community together and curtailing future violence.

“You can come on a basketball court and play without any violence, you might see that person in the street,” Mr. Eleazer said in between games Saturday on the first day of the tournament. “I played ball with him, we can talk this out.”

The latest tournament at the Riverhead Town basketball court on Horton Avenue hit even closer to home this year. Just over six months ago, Riverhead resident Demitri Hampton was killed in a still unsolved shooting.

Mr. Hampton’s mother, Juanita Trent, ran a raffle during the tournament to raise money for the scholarship formed in her son’s honor. By midday Saturday, she already had more than $400 and was hoping to reach $1,000 by the tournament’s conclusion Sunday.

Ms. Trent said her son Jamal Davis has played in the tournament several times and did so again this year.

Players wore T-shirts with names on the back of people hurt by street violence.

The event has grown to where teams from all across the region come to compete for the nearly $2,000 prize. Teams from New York City and New Jersey participated this year.

Clarence Alonzo, a 2004 Longwood graduate, said his team was prepared to defend its title from a year ago.

“We probably have two good teams that can give us a run for our money,” Mr. Alonzo said. “Everybody else has to buckle their seatbelt up and take this ride with us.”

The biggest competition was likely a team led by 6-foot-6 J.J. Moore, a former Brentwood player who played at the University of Pittsburgh. He’s currently going into his senior year at Rutgers after transferring.

In the past, NBA player A.J. Price has even shown up to play. Organizers weren’t sure whether Mr. Price would make an appearance this year.

“He plays on one of the better teams,” said referee Cliff Rowland of Center Moriches. “He’s like one of the ringers. In the championship game, A.J. shows up.”

Mr. Williams said the event is also an opportunity to bring together the community and police officers.

“If the guy’s know the officer, and the officer’s know them, if there’s a problem you’re more apt to talk to each other,” he said.

As many as 500 people stopped by the tournament Saturday, which ran all day. There were nine teams (one dropped out) playing in a double elimination tournament. The semifinals and championship are Sunday.

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05/18/13 6:14pm
05/18/2013 6:14 PM

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Demitri Hampton’s memory was honored Saturday at a fundraiser for a scholarship in his name.

More than 200 people packed into Robert Ludlam Park in Riverside Saturday afternoon to help raise funds for the college scholarship created in memory of a young Flanders man who was killed in a home invasion earlier this year.

The DQH Memorial Picnic benefited the DQH Scholarship Fund, and included a 3-on-3 basketball tournament, music, food and raffles.

The scholarship was set up this spring to honor Demitri Hampton, a 21-year-old college student who was shot and killed in January.

The DQH scholarship Fund was founded by Mr. Hampton’s relatives and will be awarded to Riverhead High School students who are looking to attend Suffolk County Community College, where Mr. Hampton was a student.

More than a dozen teams entered the tournament, donating about $300 in total to the scholarship.

The event also received gifts from Tanger Outlet Center, Riverhead Ice and other businesses, family and friends for the raffle, said Mr. Hampton’s stepfather Theodore Trent.

“They just all volunteered,” he said. “We really didn’t’ have to go asking.”

Wendy’s fast food restaurant in Riverhead has also agreed to give 10 percent of their dinner profits on the third Thursday of every month to the scholarship fund, said Juanita Trent, Demitri’s mother.

“We’re just so blessed,” she said.

People can donate to the scholarship fund by mail at DQH Scholarship Fund, 57 Maple Avenue, Riverhead NY, 11901.

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