08/11/13 8:00am
08/11/2013 8:00 AM

ROBERT O”ROURK PHOTO | The Stop the Violence Basketball Tournament at the Horton Avenue court featured some intense competition Saturday.

There’s a unique bond formed between players on a basketball court. During a game — even in the heat of competition — players can develop a respect for one another.

It’s that thinking that led Riverhead residents Dwayne Eleazer and Larry Williams to create the Stop the Violence Basketball Tournament. Now in its seventh year, the tournament has blossomed into an annual showcase of outstanding basketball — all in the hopes of bringing the community together and curtailing future violence.

“You can come on a basketball court and play without any violence, you might see that person in the street,” Mr. Eleazer said in between games Saturday on the first day of the tournament. “I played ball with him, we can talk this out.”

The latest tournament at the Riverhead Town basketball court on Horton Avenue hit even closer to home this year. Just over six months ago, Riverhead resident Demitri Hampton was killed in a still unsolved shooting.

Mr. Hampton’s mother, Juanita Trent, ran a raffle during the tournament to raise money for the scholarship formed in her son’s honor. By midday Saturday, she already had more than $400 and was hoping to reach $1,000 by the tournament’s conclusion Sunday.

Ms. Trent said her son Jamal Davis has played in the tournament several times and did so again this year.

Players wore T-shirts with names on the back of people hurt by street violence.

The event has grown to where teams from all across the region come to compete for the nearly $2,000 prize. Teams from New York City and New Jersey participated this year.

Clarence Alonzo, a 2004 Longwood graduate, said his team was prepared to defend its title from a year ago.

“We probably have two good teams that can give us a run for our money,” Mr. Alonzo said. “Everybody else has to buckle their seatbelt up and take this ride with us.”

The biggest competition was likely a team led by 6-foot-6 J.J. Moore, a former Brentwood player who played at the University of Pittsburgh. He’s currently going into his senior year at Rutgers after transferring.

In the past, NBA player A.J. Price has even shown up to play. Organizers weren’t sure whether Mr. Price would make an appearance this year.

“He plays on one of the better teams,” said referee Cliff Rowland of Center Moriches. “He’s like one of the ringers. In the championship game, A.J. shows up.”

Mr. Williams said the event is also an opportunity to bring together the community and police officers.

“If the guy’s know the officer, and the officer’s know them, if there’s a problem you’re more apt to talk to each other,” he said.

As many as 500 people stopped by the tournament Saturday, which ran all day. There were nine teams (one dropped out) playing in a double elimination tournament. The semifinals and championship are Sunday.

joew@timesreview.com

05/18/13 6:14pm
05/18/2013 6:14 PM

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Demitri Hampton’s memory was honored Saturday at a fundraiser for a scholarship in his name.

More than 200 people packed into Robert Ludlam Park in Riverside Saturday afternoon to help raise funds for the college scholarship created in memory of a young Flanders man who was killed in a home invasion earlier this year.

The DQH Memorial Picnic benefited the DQH Scholarship Fund, and included a 3-on-3 basketball tournament, music, food and raffles.

The scholarship was set up this spring to honor Demitri Hampton, a 21-year-old college student who was shot and killed in January.

The DQH scholarship Fund was founded by Mr. Hampton’s relatives and will be awarded to Riverhead High School students who are looking to attend Suffolk County Community College, where Mr. Hampton was a student.

More than a dozen teams entered the tournament, donating about $300 in total to the scholarship.

The event also received gifts from Tanger Outlet Center, Riverhead Ice and other businesses, family and friends for the raffle, said Mr. Hampton’s stepfather Theodore Trent.

“They just all volunteered,” he said. “We really didn’t’ have to go asking.”

Wendy’s fast food restaurant in Riverhead has also agreed to give 10 percent of their dinner profits on the third Thursday of every month to the scholarship fund, said Juanita Trent, Demitri’s mother.

“We’re just so blessed,” she said.

People can donate to the scholarship fund by mail at DQH Scholarship Fund, 57 Maple Avenue, Riverhead NY, 11901.

psquire@timesreview.com

04/30/13 4:00pm
04/30/2013 4:00 PM

BILL LANDON PHOTO | Bishop McGann-Mercy senior Danielle Gehring has signed to play basketball for Chestnut Hill College (Penn.).

COLLEGE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL: Gehring signs with D-II school Bishop McGann-Mercy senior Danielle Gehring signed a letter of intent to play for Chestnut Hill College, a Division II Catholic college in Germantown, Penn.

Gehring did not play basketball for McGann-Mercy her senior season. She instead opted to spend the season working out with the boys’ varsity team. She also took part in clinics, worked with basketball, speed and agility trainers and former professional players.

Gehring was McGann-Mercy’s most valuable player her junior season, averaging 12 points, 5 assists, 5 blocks and 3 3-pointers per game. She was an all-league selection.

Gehring and her younger sister, Caroline, will travel to Austria and Germany in June to represent the United States in an international basketball tournament. Her two older sisters play basketball for DeSales University, a Division III school that is a 45-minute drive away from Chestnut Hill.

Gehring said, “I visited Chestnut Hill and fell in love with the school.”

COLLEGE WOMEN’S GOLF: Accolades for Santacroce Marie Santacroce of Mattituck, a sophomore at Flagler College (Fla.), was recently named to the All-Peach Belt Conference First Team. Santacroce finished in fourth place in the conference and led Flagler in tournament scoring average this year. She was also named Flagler’s most valuable player. Santacroce ended the season with eight top-10 finishes, three top-five finishes and one first-place finish during season.

COLLEGE MEN’S TRACK AND FIELD: Clancy sets personal records SUNY/Oneonta sophomore Michael Clancy of Shoreham recorded two personal-best marks recently in the discus and hammer throw at the Upstate Track Classic. He took third place in the discus with a toss of 136 feet and fourth in the hammer throw with a distance of 150-2.

COLLEGE WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD: Two firsts for Riley UConn freshman Melodee Riley of Jamesport had a big weekend for the Huskies in an invitational meet at Brown University in Rhode Island. Riley took first place in both the long jump (5.41 meters) and the triple jump (11.90).

COLLEGE WOMEN’S ROWING: Orient rower helps league champions For the third time in as many seasons, William Smith College captured the Liberty League championship with a dominating performance on Fish Creek in Saratoga Springs. Libby Hughes of Orient competed on the varsity eight team that defeated St. Lawrence, RIT, Skidmore and Union for the title. In calm, flat conditions, William Smith’s varsity eight, ranked third in this week’s CRCA/USRowing poll, defended its league title with a 2,000-meter time of 6 minutes 44.0 seconds. It is the sixth overall league championship for the Herons.

For the third time this spring and the seventh time this year, the William Smith varsity eight was named the Liberty League Women’s Rowing Boat of the Week by the conference office.

BASEBALL: MLB pitch, hit, run competition A free Major League Baseball pitch, hit and run competition for area youths will be held May 11 at 4 p.m. at Tasker Park in Peconic. Boys and girls in four age divisions (7/8, 9/10, 11/12 and 13/14) will have the chance to advance through four levels of competition, including team championships at major league stadiums and the national finals at the 2013 MLB All-Star Game. The individual pitching, hitting and running champions, along with the all-around champions in each age and gender group at the local competition, will be awarded and advance to the sectional level of competition. All participants must bring a copy of their birth certificate and have a parent or guardian fill out a registration/waiver form prior to the start of the competition. For more information, call Brian Hansen at (631) 553-3940.

RUNNING: 5K for moms The For Our Moms 5K will be run on May 11 in Cutchogue. A fun run for kids will begin at 8:30 a.m., followed by a 5K run/walk at 8:45 a.m. Registration will start at 7:30 a.m. The pre-registration cost is $25. Day-of-the-race registration costs $30. The fun run fee is $10. To register, go to www.active.com. For more information, call (631) 680-9223. All proceeds from the event will benefit Danielle Fogarty’s Campaign for the Long Island Chapter of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.

03/28/13 1:30pm
03/28/2013 1:30 PM

GARRET MEADE PHOTO | Riverhead fans at a basketball game in March 2012.

More than a dozen Riverhead parents and Blue Waves fans met with Superintendent Nancy Carney last week to express concern about security and fan behavior at some of the more heated high school games — both at home and away.

Although it was not a public meeting, Ms. Carney later said the district is looking at ways to improve the fan experience.

Parent Kiesha Washington-Dean told the News-Review that last Wednesday’s meeting occurred in response to a Smithtown family’s claim that a Riverhead School District security official only watched as a father and daughter were verbally abused by a group of unruly parents during a Feb. 5 boys basketball game in Riverhead. In that game, which came down to the wire, Riverhead defeated Smithtown West 72-71.

The Smithtown family’s allegations were made during the public comment portion of the Riverhead school board’s regular meeting March 12.

Ms. Washington-Dean, whose son plays on Riverhead’s varsity basketball team, said although the allegations prompted the recent parent meeting, its focus was on rectifying problems parents believe have been recurring throughout the school year.

“We think that our issues were heard,” Ms. Washington-Dean said. “We all walked out [of the meeting] feeling pleased because they are willing to make changes.”

She and other parents say the district needs to provide security at away games to protect its fans, students and student-athletes. Ms. Carney said in an interview the district had discussed sending security guards to away games but ultimately decided to start sending school administrators instead.

“We will make sure we have an administrator there so, if there’s something bothering somebody, they have a person to go to,” Ms. Carney said. “The things we want as a district are to make sure we’re supporting our athletes and to make sure we’re presenting ourselves in a light that shows how proud we are as fans.”

While some parents want more security at away games, Ms. Washington-Dean said she and other parents don’t want Riverhead Town police officers at home games because they believe it gives the school a “bad perception.”

Ms. Carney said police are invited to most school events that draw large crowds to provide an extra sense of “comfort and security.”

“In my opinion, it’s good practice,” Ms. Carney said of having cops at games. “And most of our police officers are fans as well. They enjoy being at the games.”

Also responding to parent concerns about inequitable treatment from refs in the most recent basketball season and in years past, Ms. Carney said the district is evaluating data and plans to have a subsequent meeting with the district’s athletic director. She’ll also meet with the head of security and high school administrators to come up with ways to enhance all school sporting events.

“This was the first step, listening to the concerns from the community,” Ms. Carney said. “We’re using the information we’ve gathered so we can put things in place for next year that will help us go forward in a positive direction.”

jennifer@timesreview.com

03/13/13 3:40pm
03/13/2013 3:40 PM

JENNIFER GUSTAVSON PHOTO | Riverhead superintendent Nancy Carney speaks at Tuesday night’s school board meeting.

After being made aware of allegations of improper security at the February 5  boys basketball game, we conducted an investigation by interviewing those in attendance and reviewing security camera footage.  It is clear to me that our security guards, including Senior Guard Don Henderson, acted appropriately throughout the game in keeping order and enforcing civility in the crowd.  I applaud the efforts of Mr. Henderson and the other guards, along with the Riverhead Town Police, who prevented the incident from escalating into a physical confrontation.

The allegations made by a Smithtown resident and his daughter were serious, but it is clear to me that the facts do not back up their version of events.  I have no doubt that they found the incident to be unsettling, but the reactions of our security guards were appropriate and helpful.

Riverhead High School athletic events are intended to be welcoming to all fans who are there to support student athletes as they compete in their chosen sports.  We recognize that fans can become enthusiastic as they cheer on the players.  We welcome that zest and enthusiasm as long as it falls within the confines of good sportsmanship and behavior.  Our security guards are well aware of that policy and work professionally to enforce those rules.

03/07/13 8:00pm
03/07/2013 8:00 PM

WESTERN CONNECTICUT ATHLETICS PHOTO | Jackie Zilnicki of Riverhead was named to the 2013 Little East All-Conference Team.

COLLEGE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL: Zilnicki on defensive team Jackie Zilnicki of Riverhead is one of four Western Connecticut State University players who have been named to the 2013 Little East All-Conference Team. Zilnicki joined teammate Sha’Quira Palmer on the All-Defensive Team. Zilnicki, a 5-foot-8 senior guard, averaged 11.3 points and a team-high (along with Carly Murphy) 5.6 rebounds while leading the team with 41 steals.

Western Connecticut finished with an overall record of 19-8, one victory shy of the program’s fifth 20-win season in the past six years.

SUNY ONEONTA ATHLETICS PHOTO | Daniel Stern tallied eight points in a win over Southwestern University.

COLLEGE MEN’S LACROSSE: Stern gets 4 goals, 4 assists Daniel Stern, a junior from Shoreham, led the charge and finished the day with four goals and four assists for SUNY/Oneonta (1-1) in a 12-3 defeat of Southwestern University on Feb. 23. Oneonta outshot Southwestern, 42-26, and picked up 32 more ground balls (56-24). In Oneonta’s opening game of the season, a 17-6 loss to Whittier College, Oneonta started out strong, going up 2-0 on goals by James Reiser and Anthony Laureano, both off Stern assists, before Whittier tied it up by the end of the first period. The second period started much like the first as Stern put the Red Dragons on the board again. Whittier then went on an 8-0 burst to take the lead and never looked back.

11/23/12 5:00pm
11/23/2012 5:00 PM

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Riverhead baseball player Matt Crohan, joined by his parents Stephanie and Ed, signed a Letter of Intent to join Winthrop University.

When the Riverhead baseball team took the field for Senior Day in the spring of 2011, all but one player in the starting lineup was a senior. On the mound, the Blue Waves handed the ball to Matt Crohan, who happened to be the only sophomore on the varsity team that year.

Crohan, a left-hander with a versatile array of pitches, struck out six that day to earn his first varsity win. It was evident back then that Crohan had the potential to be a dominant pitcher for the Blue Waves and a player who could be throwing meaningful pitches beyond high school.

That dream became a reality when Crohan signed a National Letter of Intent this week to play baseball at Winthrop University, a Division I school in South Carolina.

Crohan was one of five Riverhead students to officially sign letters of intent during the early signing period, which ran Nov. 14-21.

Two students signed for lacrosse: Ryan Bitzer with Stony Brook and Sabina Dorr with St. Francis. Bree Ristau signed with the University of Massachusetts for rowing. And Shanice Allen signed with Pace University for basketball.

The students celebrated with brief ceremonies at the high school, where parents and coaches joined them as they signed on the dotted line.

Crohan, who also plays the outfield for Riverhead, can hit 92 mph on his fastball, coach Rob Maccone said.

“Over and above all his athletic abilities, Matt is a great kid and deserves all the recognition he has gotten and will get in the future,” Maccone said. “I’m really going to miss him.”

Crohan was an all-league player as a sophomore and junior. Last season he led the team in strikeouts and batted a team-high .500. He’s also played for a club team based in Dallas, Texas, and was selected to play on a Yankees and Phillies scout tryout team.

“I’m very excited about playing for Winthrop,” Crohan said. “I really like the coaching staff, the team, which is in a building state, and the college itself. And, the weather in South Carolina is awesome.”

Crohan plans to study business management or marketing.

RIVERHEAD SCHOOLS COURTESY PHOTO | Ryan Bitzer signed to play lacrosse at Stony Brook.

Bitzer may better be known as a quarterback at this time of year, as he leads the Blue Waves into the Division II county championship this weekend. But his college sport is lacrosse and he’ll stick close to home to play for one of the rising programs in Division I.

“I really enjoy lacrosse,” said Bitzer, who’s also a standout basketball player. “It’s very physical and uses a combination of skills. I like that.”

An all-county midfielder last spring, Bitzer was the team MVP while leading the Blue Waves to one of their best seasons in years.

“Ryan is a very talented athlete,” said Riverhead coach Vic Guadagnino. “He does the job in the classroom, on the court and out on the field in multiple sports. Not only is he a great athlete, but he is a very special person who is a pleasure to coach.”

Bitzer plans to major in business.

Dorr has been a standout in the Riverhead lacrosse program since its inception when she was a seventh-grader. A midfielder/attack, Dorr was an all-division player last year and Brine National High School all-America selection.

She scored 30 goals with eight assists last year.

RIVERHEAD SCHOOLS COURTESY PHOTO | Sabina Dorr signed to play lacrosse at St. Francis.

Dorr said St. Francis, while the smallest Division I school, is a perfect fit of her.

“When I visited campus, I immediately like the team, the coaches and the university,” she said.

St. Francis coach Gregg Gebhard is a Long Island native.

“Everyone at St. Francis is committed to giving athletes both a great playing experience and a great education,” Dorr said.

Dorr plans to enter the health sciences program with the hopes of becoming a nurse practitioner or a physician’s assistant.

Ristau, who competes with the East End Rowing Team, is the first Riverhead student to sign with a Division I team for rowing.

Last year at the Scholastic Nationals Ristau placed fourth in singles. She was second at the New York Championships. At UMass, Ristau will compete on a nationally ranked team.

RIVERHEAD SCHOOLS COURTESY PHOTO | Riverhead senior Bree Ristau will continue her rowing career next year at UMass after signing a letter of intent last week. Her father, Gary, joined her for the signing ceremony along with (standing, from left) rowing coach Michelle Zaloom with her daughter Anna, guidance counselor Chris Martin, assistant principal Charles Regan and superintendent Nancy Carney.

“I feel like I’ll fit in there perfectly,” she said.

Ristau’s coach, Michelle Zaloom, described her as “intense, tough and fearless.”

“She’s just got the right proportions for a good rower,” Zaloom said. “She’s got the arms, legs, shoulders, lungs and stamina she needs. I think she’s got what it takes to excel at UMass and to eventually qualify to row in the Olympics.”

Ristau plans to major in business.

As part of the Blue Waves’ “big three” last year, Shanice Allen helped lead the girls basketball team on a thrilling ride to the state semifinals. Allen was a huge reason for the Blue Waves’ success as the team won the Long Island championship.

Allen has been an all-league player since eighth grade and is a three-time all-county player. During the county championship win against Hauppauge she surpassed 1,000 career points.

She was second-team all-Long Island.

RIVERHEAD SCHOOLS COURTESY PHOTO | Shanice Allen, joined by her parents Kim and Willie, signed to play basketball at Pace.

“She is one of the top players I’ve ever had the pleasure of coaching,” said Riverhead coach David Spinella. “She has a quiet confidence and grace, leads by example and is never a problem.”

Allen plays AAU ball throughout the year and Spinella credited coach Greg Flynn for helping Allen gain exposure.

Allen said she’s excited about playing close to home.

“I’m really happy that my mom and dad will be able to come to my games,” she said. “They’ve always been there for me and it will be nice to have them so close.”

Allen plans to major in biology with a goal of becoming an anesthesiologist.

joew@timesreview.com

08/08/11 7:56am
08/08/2011 7:56 AM

GEORGETOWN COURTSY PHOTO | Jim Christy in his Hoyas playing days.

The basketball courts at Forest Park in Queens were not much different than many other basketball courts in New York City. They had four baskets (with no nets), a concrete playing surface, and a small wading pool was nearby where players could walk in to cool off a bit with water up to their ankles.

The features of the courts weren’t anything special, but it was a special place for longtime North Fork resident Jim Christy.

Forest Park was really where it all began for Christy’s successful basketball career. Located a couple of blocks from the Glendale home where he grew up, Christy spent countless hours there playing the game he loved. He was a Forest Park regular from the time he was 7 or 8 years old right up to the time he headed off to play for Georgetown University.

It was at Forest Park where Christy honed his game. Nothing was organized. It was almost all half-court pickup games of three on three or four on four. Rarely were full-court games played. The half-court games helped players develop the concept of proper spacing and moving without the ball, said Christy.

“You arrived [at the courts] at 8 in the morning and you might not get home until 5 or 6 at night,” he recalled.

The four baskets represented a tier system. “There was really one that you wanted to play on,” Christy said. “There was one basket where all the best players played. … Court No. 1 was where all the hot shots played.”

Forest Park had no referees, but plenty of life lessons for a young player. The incentive to win was strong. Players had to earn their playing time.

“The beauty of it was if you lost, you probably had to sit 45 minutes before you got back on the court,” Christy said. “That made for some very competitive games.”

Of course, Christy played elsewhere as a youth. As a high school student, he got to play against college players sometimes in Rockaway during the summer. He played in open gyms during the winter months and played in Catholic Youth Organization games on Friday nights and Sundays.

“The competition in the CYO was really outstanding,” he said, noting that all five starting players on one of his CYO teams all went on to play NCAA Division I basketball.

But Forest Park was Christy’s home court, his first basketball school, his home away from home.

“It was a great place,” Christy said. “It was so much fun. It was so much passion. … Everything mattered.”

Forest Park launched a playing career for Christy, who became an all-New York City player for St. Pascal Baylon High School in St. Albans, Queens. (He was selected as one of the top 100 high school players to have played in New York City by the New York Daily News about 10 years ago.)

Christy could shoot. He once scored 78 points in a game for St. Pascal. His late father, Tom, would keep track of his son’s shooting percentage by putting a penny in his left sweater pocket for every field-goal attempt that his son made and one in his right sweater pocket for every one he missed.

When it came time to think about where Christy would attend college, he had a discussion with his father about basketball being a means to an end, not an end in itself. As Christy saw it, his college choice was a no-brainer.

“Georgetown academically was the perfect fit,” he said. Plus, it was located in the nation’s capital, a major city, and not far from home.

The college game was much different back then. There was no shot clock, no three-point shot, and freshmen were not permitted to play for varsity teams. But Georgetown’s coach at the time, Tom O’Keefe, gave Christy a vote of confidence when he was a sophomore, telling him that the starting point guard job was his.

Thus began a tremendous college career. Christy played alongside teammates such as James Barry, the brother of former professional player Rick Barry; Paul Tagliabue, the former National Football League commissioner; and retired Gen. James Jones, who was a United States Marine Corps commandant.

By the time Christy graduated, he was the school’s No. 2 all-time leading scorer with 1,101 points (he has since dropped to 33rd on the list). Over the course of his time at Georgetown, he averaged 15.5 points per game, including 17.4 as a junior and 17.5 as a senior. His free-throw percentage of 81.6 percent ranks him second in school history.

It was during his senior year, Christy said, when the notion of a professional basketball career crossed his mind as pro teams expressed an interest in him. He evidently didn’t consider it for long, though. He responded to letters from the Baltimore Bullets and the New York Knicks, telling them he was not interested.

Nonetheless, the Knicks made Christy their 10th-round draft pick in 1964, after selecting Howard “Butch” Komives and Willis Reed in earlier rounds. But Christy never attended a Knicks camp. He had made plans to marry his wife, Betty, and raise a family after his college graduation. “Those were the areas that were much more important to me,” he said.

It was three years later when the American Basketball Association was formed, creating more opportunities for players. Regardless, Christy said the all-consuming, travelling life of a pro basketball player wasn’t for him.

“You wonder if things would have been different,” Christy said. “I don’t regret it for a moment. You wonder [about] the road not taken. I can’t imagine that it would be any better than the way things have been.”

Christy took a job in the Mattituck-Cutchogue School District in 1969. He never left the school district until his retirement as the director of guidance in 2003.

Christy, 69, who splits time between homes in Mattituck and The Three Villages, Fla., coached numerous sports at Mattituck. He remains the coach of the Tuckers’ girls varsity tennis team.

In 1975, Christy was inducted into the Georgetown Hall of Fame. Another big honor followed in 2007 when he was selected to Georgetown’s all-century team in conjunction with the school’s 100th anniversary, joining the likes of Eric “Sleepy” Floyd, Patrick Ewing, Michael Jackson, Reggie Williams, Charles Smith and Dikembe Mutombo. Christy and the 24 other all-century honorees were recognized during halftime of a Marquette-Georgetown game at the Verizon Center. The former players were announced one by one. When the spotlight was cast on Christy, he took his place among Georgetown’s best.

The event gave Christy the opportunity to meet players he had become fans of and get to know them as people.

“I was very impressed with who they are,” he said. “It’s really nice to know that you’re a part of that.”

“What it did was it kind of reminded me of what was four terrific years. It brings back some very good memories. I feel as if I am reconnected with the university.”

It all began at Forest Park. Christy said the last time he drove by the park “you could hear the bouncing of the ball. You could hear the kids playing. It wasn’t quite as many kids as I remember, but still a very active community.”

bliepa@timesreview.com