08/05/13 8:00am
08/05/2013 8:00 AM
KATHARINE SCHROEDER FILE PHOTO | Peconic Bay Winery is for sale, months after its tasting room closed.

KATHARINE SCHROEDER FILE PHOTO | Peconic Bay Winery is for sale, months after its tasting room closed.

In January, Peconic Bay Winery closed its Cutchogue tasting room to the public and transferred operations to the Empire State Cellars store at Tanger Outlets in Riverhead.

At the time, general manager Jim Silver was adamant that the winery, founded in 1979, had no plans to close its Cutchogue location altogether.

“We are absolutely not closing our tasting room,” Mr. Silver told The Suffolk Times last winter. “We are just changing it and re-purposing the Cutchogue property. The biggest crowds came out for the special events and we’re going to keep doing them.”

But now, six months later, the winery, including the tasting room and 25 acres of planted vineyards on Main Road, is for sale, Mr. Silver told the New York Times.

“After assessing the profitability of the tasting room, we determined that the return on our investment was not at all reasonable,” Mr. Silver said. He added that hard cider production will not be affected by the winery’s sale.

Paul and Ursula Lowerre, who bought the winery in 1999, might retain the brand, Mr. Silver is quoted as saying. The Lowerres’ 30 acres of vines on Oregon Road in Cutchogue are not on the market.

Russell Hearn, chief operating officer at Premium Wine Group in Mattituck, will oversee vineyard maintenance and acquire the 2013 grapes, Mr. Silver said.

ryoung@timesreview.com

06/29/13 10:30am
06/29/2013 10:30 AM
FAMILY COURTESY PHOTO | Patricia Kos Woods has been missing since Wednesday, family members said.

FAMILY COURTESY PHOTO | Patricia Kos Woods has been missing since Wednesday.

UPDATE: The missing Miller Place woman who was thought to possibly be on the North Fork was located Friday evening at a church in Middle Island, her sister, Cathy Danowski, posted on Facebook Saturday morning.

Patricia Kos Woods, 53, had been missing since Wednesday. Police located her car at a church next to Cathedral Pines, a place she visited with her father when she was young, her sister said. Police found Ms. Woods inside.

Ms. Woods was taken to Stony Brook University Medical Center, her sister said.

“This is a miracle and a major relief to friends and family,” Ms. Danowski wrote on Facebook.

Ms. Woods suffers from depression and may have been disoriented from not taking her medication, Ms. Danowski said Friday.

Original Story:
The family of a missing woman with ties to the North Fork is asking for residents’ help in finding her.

Patricia Kos Woods, 53, of Miller Place was last seen Wednesday in the Miller Place area, driving a silver 2002 Ford Taurus with a dent in its front bumper near the passenger side, family members said.

Ms. Woods is described as 5-foot-7-inches tall, with medium length brown hair, brown eyes and was seen wearing a necklace with a cross and heart-shaped pendant, family said.

Ms. Woods, who has suffered from depression, may be disoriented because she hasn’t taken her medication since Wednesday, said her sister, Cathy Danowski.

Police were able to track signals from her cell phone when it was turned on and saw that she visited her old high school in Miller Place and a North Shore beach, Ms. Danowski said.

Ms. Woods’ father grew up in Cutchogue and family members believe she may attempt to go visit her grandparents’ former home as well, Ms. Danowski said.

“It looked like she was going to places that meant something to her,” she said, adding that Ms. Woods may also attempt to board the Orient ferry or visit her godmother in Jamesport.

She hasn’t taken money out of her bank account, Ms. Danowski said.

Ms. Woods went missing once before in November and was located 36 hours later after an ambulance volunteer who was treating her recognized her from her missing poster, Ms. Danowski said.

If you believe you’ve seen Ms. Woods, family members ask that you call police at 911, and to call 744-5225.

psquire@timesreview.com

05/19/13 7:00am
05/19/2013 7:00 AM

ASHLEY GOELLER COURTESY PHOTO | Geddes Levenson (left) and Kelly Goeller with one of the drums used to create the music box.

Like many young girls, Cutchogue sisters Kelly and Ashley Goeller had a music box in their younger days. Tiny and crafted from metal, it played the theme song from “The Pink Panther.”

Little did the Goeller girls know that as adults they and a friend would build a music box that would barely fit in most garages for the FIGMENT Interactive Sculpture Garden on Governors Island in Upper New York Bay, a half mile from Manhattan’s southern tip.

Construction plans for the larger-than-life-size instrument began in February, when freelance artist Kelly, 26, and Ashley, 20, a sophomore at Parsons School of Design, were sitting around their Brooklyn apartment with a friend, 26-year-old painter Geddes Levenson, a graduate student at Pratt Institute.

“We were thinking of applying to the FIGMENT Interactive Sculpture Garden and we were brainstorming ideas,” Ashley said.

FIGMENT was formed in 2007 as a one-day participatory art event free to the public on Governors Island. Since then, its offerings have grown substantially. Beginning in 2009, the island’s parade grounds have temporarily housed sculpture projects by local artists that people can interact with on weekends from June 8 to Sept. 22.

An artist’s rendering of the giant interactive music box that will be installed on Governors Island.

The trio believed they could come up with something creative enough to be accepted for inclusion in the competitive program. But what? They kicked around a few ideas before gazing over at the sisters’ old music box, sitting on a table.

“We thought, ‘What if we enlarged it?’ ” Kelly said.

So they did. After FIGMENT accepted their proposal, the sisters and Ms. Levenson set to work constructing the instrument, which is 10 feet wide and four feet high, from wood and steel. The music box will work in much the same way as much smaller versions. Pegs on rotating drums will strike tuned metal strips to generate individual notes.

The big music box will have two handles rather than one. Cranking one handle will produce the melody of an original song composed by their friend Alex Nelson; the other handle produces the harmony. Depending on how quickly the handles are turned, any number of arrangements and rhythms can be generated.

“Everyone these days listens to music digitally. It’s very individual,” Ashley said. “We wanted to make it collaborative, so in order to play the song two people have to turn the handles.”

The Goellers and Ms. Levenson needed close to $5,000 to obtain the materials for their project. FIGMENT provided a partial grant to get them started, but they needed an additional $3,500 to bring their vision to fruition. To reach their goal, the women created a page on Kickstarter, a website that enables donors to help finance creative projects.

“We chose Kickstarter because you set a certain number of days and if you don’t reach your goal you don’t receive any of your money,” Ashley said. “We thought it was a really good way to rally people for our cause.”

Rally they did. In less than two weeks the women reached their $3,500 goal, receiving donations from people as far away as Australia.

“Complete strangers getting behind the project was amazing,” Ms. Levenson said. “It makes me feel so full of faith in the project and the idea that people will really appreciate it because they believe in it without even seeing it.”

That’s not to say creating a giant music box hasn’t been challenging. Ms. Levenson has taken wood crafting and metalwork classes but the Goeller sisters work predominantly in the visual arts.

“I’ve never been an engineer,” Kelly said. “Figuring out how to create a machine that has to work with gears and bearings is all ne w to us.”

Any frustration the women felt is dissipating daily as the project nears completion. They expect to finish it by the end of the month and transport it to Governors Island by June 8.

“You can see it. You can feel it,” Ms. Levenson said. “Now that we’re physically working on it, you can see the progress we’re making. You can see how it’s going to come together.”

The music box creators say if they receive additional funding they hope to move the instrument to an art gallery or museum once its run on Governors Island ends on Sept. 22. If not, the music box will likely need to be moved to a storage facility. Housing the music box in a gallery is “one of our goals,” Ashley said. “We’ll see what happens.”

ryoung@timesreview.com

03/01/13 6:53pm
03/01/2013 6:53 PM
VERA CHINESE FILE PHOTO | The Valero gas station on Main Road in Cutchogue.

VERA CHINESE FILE PHOTO | The Valero gas station on Main Road in Cutchogue.

State police troopers arrested one clerk during an undercover sting operation Thursday to test whether store employees would sell alcohol to a minor in Southold Town, authorities said.

But 12 other stores passed the test, state police said.

Mohammad Ayub, 51, of Flanders was the one person nabbed in the sting, police said.

Mr. Ayub, a clerk at Valero Food Mart on Main Road in Cutchogue, was charged with unlawful dealing with a child, a misdemeanor, and a state alcohol sales violation, police said.

No other details were available.

01/23/13 4:52pm
PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Erek Berntsen cuts wood at a construction site near the Glass Greenhouse in Jamesport.

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Construction worker Erek Berntsen near the Glass Greenhouse in Jamesport.

For most, even the easiest tasks become a hassle when temperatures start to drop.

But for many workers across the North Fork this week, being out in the cold is just part of the job.

“You can’t take a job outside and not expect to be out in the cold,” said Erek Berntsen, a construction worker at the Glass Greenhouse in Jamesport.

High temperatures reached 20 degrees on the North Fork Wednesday, about 10 to 15 degrees below normal, said Dan Hoffman, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Upton.

“The next 36 hours are going to be the coldest,” Mr. Hoffman said. Temperatures will slowly rise into the weekend, reaching the freezing point by Sunday, he said.

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Herman Salazar trims grape vines at a vineyard in Jamesport Wednesday afternoon.

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Herman Salazar trims grape vines at a vineyard in Jamesport Wednesday afternoon.

Mr. Berntsen had been out in the cold since 7 a.m., cutting pieces of wood to build the rafters of a new farm stand on the property.

A few miles east on Route 25, Bob Boergesson, a Mattituck-Cutchogue School District crossing guard, said wind is the biggest challenge he faces in the cold.

“Layers … [cover] up as much as you can,” he advised. “It’s the wind that gets you.”

On South Harbor Road in Southold, seven LIPA workers were found using a utility trucks to trim trees away from power wires.

“It is extremely cold,” conceded a LIPA foreman, who did not give his name. “Even colder up there.”

Despite the frigid temperatures, the foreman said worker morale is still high.

“We’re always good,” he said. “We complain, but we get the work done.”

At a local vineyard, laborer Emilio Jebier used a pruner to cut away dead vines from the trellis.

“Good vines means good selection [of grapes] for next year,” Mr. Jebier said while working at Jason’s Vineyard in Jamesport. Mr. Jebier has been tending to vines for 13 years, and said he’s used to working in the cold when he needs to.

Nearby, Herman Salazar of Mattituck was also clipping vines, a black ski mask covering his face from the bitter wind.

A group of half a dozen workers had been out at the vineyard  since 7 a.m. and will keep trimming until 4:30 p.m., Mr. Salazar said. The next day, they’ll do it all again. The group works six days a week in the field.

“The snow isn’t bad, the cold [is],” Mr. Salazar said, peeling the ski mask below his face. ”Today is very freezing.”

But some workers said this week’s cold weather wasn’t the worse they’ve experienced.

“This is nothing,” said a Suffolk County Water Authority worker on Route 25 in Cutchogue. “When you have a water main break, you’re out there for 24 hours straight in the cold.”

Their advice? Keep busy.

“Working a couple years in this, you get used to it,” said another worker.

psquire@timesreview.com

01/14/13 2:58pm
01/14/2013 2:58 PM

GIANNA VOLPE FILE PHOTO | Peconic Bay Winery will now do all its non-member tastings at Empire State Cellars at the Tanger Outlet Center.

Peconic Bay Winery will be closing its Cutchogue tasting room to the general public, but the location will continue to be the site of special events and where the company’s wine will be fermented, bottled and stored, according to general manager Jim Silver.

Mr. Silver said Empire State Cellars at Tanger Outlets in Riverhead — where the company currently sells almost 800 New York wines and some liquor — will soon feature an exclusive space for Peconic Bay Winery products and will also serve as the winery’s retail and tasting room headquarters. Peconic Bay Winery owns the outlet, which it opened about a year ago.

The Cutchogue property will still serve as the location for the Peconic Bay Winery wine club and other private events, as well as food and music festivals.

“A lot of people don’t know what to make of this and some think we are closing,” Mr. Silver said. “We are absolutely not closing our tasting room. We are just changing it and re-purposing the [Cutchogue] property. The biggest crowds came out for the special events and we’re going to keep doing them.”

In a press release, Mr. Silver said the Riverhead tasting room “can accommodate dozens of interested wine tasters each day and the hours of operation are much longer than they are at the winery. We’ll reach a lot more people this way.”

He said though the company laments no longer offering open mic and other frequent events for local musicians, the sound of music will not be leaving the property for good.

Two festivals are already planned with event production company Starfish Junction which puts on such events as the North Fork Craft Beer, BBQ & Wine Festival at Martha Clara Vineyards and the Pour the Core hard cider festival held at Peconic Bay Winery in October.

“We’re planning another cider festival for Oct. 5 and I have a meeting in two weeks for a wine-related festival,” Mr. Silver said, adding that the Cutchogue Lions car show will also soon be held at the Cutchogue location.

Mr. Silver said he is currently talking with limo and other private driving companies to make Tanger a stop on the North Fork wine trail.

“On the way out after a day of touring the area, who wouldn’t feel like a little shopping,” Mr. Silver said. “Guys can come have a beer at the bar and girls can check out some of the shops. It’s going to be a fun place.”

Mr. Silver said the North Fork region accommodates about two million people annually, a number he said is growing all the time.

“Our piece of that is 40 to 50,000 and that’s a lot. I think with this move, there will be more traffic to go around to the other local vineyards and will bring loyal Peconic Bay wine drinkers to Tanger,” he said.  “It’s going to be a bit more quiet around here in Cutchogue, but we’re going to keep ourselves just as busy and I don’t think it will end up having too much of an impact.”

Mr. Silver said North Forkers who truly love the Cutchogue location should join the wine club.

“Wine club members come in all the time to pick up their shipments and hundreds of them will show up,” he said. “We’re going to have eight wine club weekends in Cutchogue, so wine club members can have the place all to themselves.”

gvolpe@timesreview.com

 

01/13/13 12:00pm
01/13/2013 12:00 PM

TIM KELLY PHOTO | Times/Review Newsgroup owner Andrew Olsen (right) introduces legislative candidates Al Krupski and Sean Walter at the start of the Jan. 7 debate sponsored by Times/Review.

Andrew Olsen, who with wife Sarah recently purchased the Times/Review Newsgroup, which publishes The Riverhead-News Review, will be the featured speaker at the next dinner meeting of the Mattituck Chamber of Commerce Thursday, Jan. 17.

A native of Southold now residing in Cutchogue, Mr. Olsen has served as a publisher of Times/Review’s publications since 2003.

The meeting will take place at the Bayview Inn in South Jamesport, starting at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $25.

RSVP to Pat Patchell at 722-3458.

Times/Review also publishes The Suffolk Times, Shelter Island Reporter and Long Island Wine Press.

11/02/12 3:43pm
11/02/2012 3:43 PM
Aerial Photos, Gas Crisis, Long Island, Tanger, Hurricane Sandy

GIANNA VOLPE PHOTO | Gas lines at Hess in Riverhead after Sandy.

News-Review staffer Gianna Volpe took to the sky Friday in an airplane — but with a camera in hand — and took these aerial photos of gas lines stretching in both directions from Hess station on Route 58.

Lines at the Hess, near the Tanger Outlets, stretched past the Long Island Expressway to the west when the photos were taken about noon.

Readers reported some 200 cars were waiting for gas at the station, with Riverhead Town police officers and New York State troopers standing by.

Read more about the gas crisis.

See riverheadnewsreview.com on Saturday for shoreline aerial photos.

GIANNA VOLPE PHOTO | Gas lines stretching from the Route 58 Hess near Tanger.

GIANNA VOLPE PHOTO | Gas lines stretching from the Route 58 Hess near Tanger.

Aerial shots, News-Review, Riverhead, Hess, gas lines

GIANNA VOLPE PHOTO | Gas line along Route 58 about noon Friday in Riverhead.

Tanger, Gas Crisis, Long Island, Riverhead

GIANNA VOLPE PHOTO | Gas lines stretching from the Route 58 Hess near Tanger.