04/25/14 8:00am
04/25/2014 8:00 AM
A mute swan mother with her cygnets in East Marion. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder)

A mute swan mother with her cygnets in East Marion. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder)

Stakeholders on both sides of a life-or-death debate met in Albany last Thursday to discuss the future of the mute swan, an invasive species on the cusp of widespread population growth in New York.

There are approximately 2,200 mute swans in the state, according to the Department of Environmental Conservation, which are expected to reproduce at a rate of 13 to 20 percent annually.  (more…)

04/25/14 8:00am
(Credit: Hunter Desportes/CreativeCommons.org)

(Credit: Hunter Desportes/CreativeCommons.org)

WHAT’S THE PROBLEM?

Aggression toward humans and native animal species, the depletion of submerged vegetation in aquatic ecosystems and degraded water quality due to droppings are among the negative impacts of mute swan populations, environmental experts say. Those concerns have prompted the state Department of Environmental Conservation to develop a wildlife management plan aimed at greatly reducing populations.  (more…)

03/07/14 11:41am
03/07/2014 11:41 AM
(Credit: Jim Colligan, file)

(Credit: Jim Colligan, file)

As the old saying goes: if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.

And so it went for opponents of a federal operation to cull deer across the East End — to a degree.

A state Supreme Court judge ruled yesterday that the Department of Environmental Conservation can no longer issue any deer damage permits in relation to the program, at least until March 28, limiting the number of deer that will be killed.

However, permits and deer tags that have been issued can be filled under the existing permits, the judge ruled.

(more…)

02/28/14 3:05pm
02/28/2014 3:05 PM

121610i_DeerTick_JC

After months of debate and a failed lawsuit filed by opponents of the plan, a deer cull kicked off this week across multiple private properties on eastern Long Island, as parcels in Southold, Riverhead and Southampton have received state approval for the hunt.

A source familiar with the operation said the sharpshooters started working Riverhead Monday.

(more…)

12/05/13 12:00pm
12/05/2013 12:00 PM
JIM COLLIGAN FILE PHOTO

JIM COLLIGAN FILE PHOTO

North Fork legislators are lobbying the chair of the state’s Environmental Conservation Committee to pass a bill that would have given local municipalities on the East End the authority to loosen some restrictions on deer hunting had it not been stalled in the lower house of the state Legislature last year.

In a letter addressed to state Assemblyman Robert Sweeney (D-Lindenhurst), Suffolk County Legislator Al Krupski — the initial author of the letter, which was written late last month — said “the overpopulation of white-tailed deer is a crisis which has plagued the East End of Long Island for many years, negatively impacting not only human health, but water quality, biodiversity, private property, the economy and the agricultural industry.”

The four-page letter — supported so far by Southold Town, the Village of Greenport and groups including the North Fork Environmental Council, North Fork Audubon Society and North Fork Deer Management Alliance — calls upon Mr. Sweeney to move the bill out of the committee it never left last year, so the entire Assembly can vote on it. The state Senate passed the bill, 59-2, in May.

Steven Liss, a legislative aide to Mr. Sweeney, said in a phone conversation that officials with the Department of Environmental Conservation — which regulates hunting in New York State — expressed concern about granting towns and villages the option to loosen state regulations. State Senator Ken LaValle (R-Port Jefferson) said he recalled no such opposition while passing the bill last year. A DEC spokesperson said the authority does not comment on pending legislation.

Mr. Liss said that if the deer “crisis” is as severe as some say it is, measures more drastic than deregulating hunting laws will be needed to reduce the herd. He pointed to a plan which Southold Town will be implementing, made possible through a Long Island Farm Bureau grant, that involves hiring United States Department of Agriculture sharpshooters to use measures above and beyond state law <\h>— including baiting and hunting at night <\h>— to cut down drastically the number of deer in the area. Riverhead officials have expressed skepticism to this plan, however, noting that opening more opportunities to hunters would be more preferable than spending money to bring in hunters from outside the area.

“If we’re talking about opening up hunting opportunities, we support that,” Mr. Liss said. “But if we’re talking about culling the herd down to a manageable level, that’s a different conversation.”

The amendments to the state hunting law proposed by Assemblyman Fred Thiele last year would have given the five East End towns the ability to reduce bowhunting setbacks down to 150 feet, from the current state regulations of 500 feet. In addition, opening up a special firearms hunting season for the entire month of January was proposed; currently, only weekdays are allowed. These measures, as well as a couple of other changes offered by Mr. Thiele, were suggested in a deer management plan published by the DEC in October 2011.

In September, a forum hosted by the town on the topic of culling the herd brought out over 300 residents interested in the issue. Southold Supervisor Scott Russell called the problem of deer overpopulation a “public health crisis” at the time.

Because of opposition to reducing setbacks he says Mr. Sweeney has expressed, Mr. Thiele — who represents the South Fork and Shelter Island — said in a Tuesday interview that he plans submitting two bills related to deer management next month when the Assembly returns to Albany. One, he said, would expand the opportunity for localities statewide to reduce their setbacks and the other deals with all the other elements of the original bill.

While he sees no single solution to the deer problem in the immediate future, Mr. Thiele said it’s a step in the right direction.

“All we are trying to do is follow the deer management plan,” he said. “To use a bad pun, no silver bullet is going to solve this issue. But this is one way to work toward that. Every little bit counts.”

The letter to Mr. Sweeney, chair of the Environmental Conservation Committee since 2007, goes beyond the previously proposed amendments to state law, proposing the use of baits as well as trapping and humane euthanasia of deer.

“Every humane tool must be utilized to get our deer population down to reasonable levels as soon as possible,” the letter states.

While the future of the bill in the Assembly remains unclear, Mr. LaValle said he should have no problem passing the new bill through the state Senate next year.

12/05/13 8:00am

Property owners across the North Fork and beyond now have easy access to information concerning contaminated areas they may – or may not – have known existed in their neighborhoods.

The state Department of Environmental Conservation has released information about 1,950 different locations across the state that have been investigated for possible environmental contamination, according to DEC officials.

Prior to the release, only two locations in Southold Town and the Riverhead area had been made public on the DEC’s website, the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant in Calverton (more commonly known as EPCAL) and the Mattituck Airbase, said DEC spokesman Aphrodite Montalvo.

Though nine other locations have been added to the website, none of those locations have been newly discovered as contaminated sites, she said.

The information can be accessed on the DEC’s website along with about 2,500 sites that had already been made public and listed online, good for 4,450 total sites.

The newly added sites were mostly unknown to the public until now, local environmentalists said.

Jenn Hartnagel, a senior environmental advocate for the nonprofit Group for the East End, said she had been calling on the state agency “for some time” to release information about sites it has been investigating, in the interest of “transparency.”

“The earlier we know that their might be a problem, the more capable we are with dealing with them and making informed decisions,” she said.

Making the information readily accessible to the public gives people and local governments the opportunity to better understand these locations, and the extent of potentially hazardous conditions associated with groundwater and soil contamination, she said.

Prior to the release, information about these sites was only available by request, largely because the information is considered to be preliminary, incomplete, or not verified, Ms. Montalvo cautioned.

“Information about these sites can easily be misunderstood,” she said. “Their mere existence may unnecessarily raise concern about human exposures or environmental impacts before the sites are better characterized. Due to the nature of this information, significant conclusions or decisions should not be based solely upon the released summaries.”

The DEC released information about the sites in response to an increasing number of requests for property information, often associated with buying and selling property, according to an agency release announcing the measure. Below is information on sites, as provided online. The number matches the map above.

1) Calverton NWIRP 02 (EPCAL)

Grumman Boulevard, Calverton

As many as 230 gallons of fuel are recorded to have been spilled in the area. Groundwater contaminants found included fuel-type and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), believed to be from unreported spills of solvents used to clean the aircraft engines and fuel systems. Potable water that is contaminated above drinking water standards is currently being treated.

2) Riverhead Landfill

Youngs Avenue, Riverhead

This facility accepted municipal and industrial wastes, and construction and demolition debris. In 1980, spent industrial solvents of unknown composition were disposed at an on-site brush dump. The results of the most recent sampling, done in June of 1992, indicate that no substance of concern was found to be migrating from the landfill.

3) Riverhead Hortonsphere Site

West Main Street, Riverhead

Manufactured gas and stored natural gas. Began operations sometime prior to 1944 and was dismantled and removed in 1998. The site has been undeveloped since.

4) L.I. Horticultural Research Lab

3059 Sound Avenue, Riverhead

Application tanks containing pesticides were periodically washed and cleaned with rinse waters discharged into two leaching structures located on-site, which led to the contamination of subsurface soil.

A well survey was conducted in the area and no site-related contamination has been detected in the private wells. Contaminated surface soils were excavated and the remaining deep soils will be covered with an impervious liner to minimize further groundwater contamination.

5) Altaire Pharmaceuticals Inc.

311 West Lane, Aquebogue

This facility is being tracked because it once managed a type of hazardous waste.

It has not been determined whether any environmental releases have caused concern at this facility. As information for this site becomes available, it will be reviewed by the NYSDOH to determine if site contamination presents public health exposure concerns.

6) Graphics of Peconic Inc.

300 Pleasure Drive, Flanders

This facility is being tracked because it once managed a type of hazardous waste.

It has not been determined whether any environmental releases of concern have occurred at this facility. As information for this site becomes available, it will be reviewed by the NYSDOH to determine if site contamination presents public health exposure concerns.

7) Mattituck Airbase

Airway Drive (off New Suffolk Ave), Mattituck

Solvent rinses and wastewater from the facility were discharged to leaching pools until the pools were closed in 1979. Analyses of samples from the pools indicated elevated levels of copper, iron, nickel, zinc, lead, and cadmium. Contaminated soils were excavated and disposed of in 1997.

8) Southold Landfill

Cox Lane, north of Route 48, Cutchogue

This facility accepted municipal and domestic wastes, demolition, and landscaping debris, and cesspool and septic tank wastes from 1951 to Oct. 1993.

Based on the information contained in the reports, the wastes disposed at this site are not hazardous.

9) Cutchogue Freone Plume

Harbor Land and Oak Street, Cutchogue

The Suffolk County Department of Health Services has discovered VOCs in private homeowner wells in the area. A later investigation found no sources of VOCs breaching groundwater standards and it was further determined that there is no longer a threat in this area.

10) Southold Acetylene Gas Production

370 Hobart Road, Southold

The acetylene manufacturing facility, which was operated by the Southold Lighting Company from 1906 to 1921, produced acetylene gas for the surrounding community. A number of organic and inorganic compounds are present at the site in surface soil.

11) Mitchell Property

115 Front Street, Greenport

Fourteen underground storage tanks containing gasoline, diesel fuel, fuel oil or waste oils had leaked, impacting soils in the vicinity of the tanks. Soils were later excavated and disposed of off-site. The site has since been remediated.

11/27/13 2:00pm
11/27/2013 2:00 PM
Instagram photo, courtesy Department Environmental Conservation

DEC COURTESY INSTAGRAM PHOTO | This photo posted to Instagram was taken after the four men allegedly captured the deer, DEC officials said. One of the men later said the charges were exaggerated.

The four local men accused of snapping photos with a pair of deer they pursued and captured before putting them online earlier this month were each offered a reduced fine in exchange for community service Wednesday morning.

The plea deal came during an appearance in Riverhead Town court for the four defendants: 18-year-old George Salzmann of Calverton, 19-year-old Conor Lingerfelt of Jamesport, 20-year-old Joseph Sacchitello of Riverhead and 20-year-old  Anthony Infantolino of Wading River.

All were offered 20 hours of community service per ticket in exchange for reducing the maximum $250 fine to $100 per citation, prosecutors said in court. If they take the deal, the men would also have to pay a $75 surcharge.

The four were not required to plead in court, and would get the benefits of the deal if they complete the community service before their next court appearances in January. Court officials said one of the four might decide not to take the offer, and would have to pay the full fine if found guilty.

Department of Environmental Conservation officials said they were tipped off on Halloween when someone sent the two pictures to them, one of which apparently showed the four men smiling while one held the deer and another held a can of beer in the air.

The pictures had been posted on Instagram, a social media photo sharing website.

Instagram photo, courtesy Department Environmental Conservation

DEC COURTESY INSTAGRAM PHOTO

Authorities said the Mr. Salzmann and Mr. Lingerfelt caught the first deer while it was trapped inside a fence.

The other deer, officials said, was caught after it was chased down on Hulse Landing Road in Wading River and trapped between the four men’s vehicle and a fence. Authorities said both deer were apparently brought back to Mr. Infantolino’s house in Wading River and were later released unharmed.

The four men were issued citations for illegal take and pursuit of protected wildlife. Officials said Mr. Salzmann was given three tickets — two for illegally taking and pursuing deer, and one more for having an untagged deer head at his home.

Mr. Lingerfelt was given two citations for illegally taking and pursuing deer. He is spotted in both photos with Mr. Salzmann, officials said. Mr. Sacchitello and Mr. Infantolino, 20, of Wading River, were each charged once.

DEC officials found the four men at Bean & Bagel on Route 25 in Calverton the next day and cited them for the incident.

“Although these young men may have thought their actions were harmless and trivial, serious consequences can occur due to these types of actions,” said DEC Regional Director Peter Scully earlier this month.

But one of the men disputed the DEC’s claims. Mr. Salzmann told the News-Review that the four hadn’t trapped the deer, but instead were caring for it after they found it injured on the side of the road.

“I go out and I try to do the right thing and it came back to bite me in the butt,” he said on Nov. 13. He said he regretted taking the photo with alcohol, but denied any of the four were intoxicated and said they did the right thing.

“The photo that was taken with the beer was probably not the best photo, but the photo of us holding it and smiling – I don’t see any harm in that,” Mr. Salzmann said.

11/13/13 2:23pm
11/13/2013 2:23 PM
Instagram photo, courtesy Department Environmental Conservation

Instagram photo courtesy of the Department of Environmental Conservation

After posting pictures of themselves on Instagram with a pair of live deer they caught, four local young men who were later caught by Department of Environmental Conservation officers in Calverton face citations for illegally taking and pursuing wildlife.

DEC officials said they were tipped off on Halloween when someone sent the two pictures to them, which were posted on the social media photo sharing website. The next day, the four men were spotted at a local business in Calverton, however it was not immediately clear at which establishment they were seen.

The four men – ranging from ages 18 to 20 – were issued citations for illegal take and pursuit of protected wildlife. Officials said 18-year-old George Salzmann of Calverton, seen holding the deer in both photos, was given three tickets — two for illegally taking and pursuing deer, and one more for having an untagged deer head at his home.

Conor Lingerfelt, 19, of Jamesport, was given two citations for illegally taking and pursuing deer. He is spotted in both photos with Mr. Salzmann, officials said. Joseph Sacchitello, 20, of Riverhead, and Anthony Infantolino, 20, of Wading River, were each charged once. DEC officials said one of the photos has all four individuals with one stressed deer.

According to DEC spokeswoman Aphrodite Montalvo, one deer had been trapped inside a fence when Mr. Salzmann and Mr. Lingerfelt wrangled it. The other, she said, was tracked down on Hulse Landing Road in Wading River by the four men. She said as they drove their vehicle parallel to the deer alongside deer fence on the road, they cut off the deer and trapped it between the vehicle and the fence. They were then able to hop out and catch it.

Both deer were apparently brought back to Infantolino’s house in Wading River. Ms. Montalvo said both deer involved in the incidents were released unharmed.

“The pursuit and capture of native wildlife is not tolerated in New York State,” said DEC Regional Director Peter Scully. “Although these young men may have thought their actions were harmless and trivial, serious consequences can occur due to these types of actions. Wildlife can be dangerous and unpredictable, and DEC’s environmental conservation offices deserve recognition for their successful pursuit of this case.”

The four men are due in Riverhead justice court on Nov. 27. Each offense carries a $250 fine.

Individuals who spot illegal activities are encouraged to call DEC’s Environmental Conservation Police at (631) 444-0250 during business hours, and 1-877-457-5680 or 1-800-TIPP-DEC at all other times to report suspected illegal activities.

Instagram photo, courtesy Department Environmental Conservation

Instagram photo courtesy of the Department of Environmental Conservation