10/24/13 1:57pm
10/24/2013 1:57 PM
Calverton EPCAL sign

MICHAEL WHITE FILE PHOTO | One of two signs marking the EPCAL entrance along Route 25.

The state bill to create a plan to fast track development projects at Enterprise Park at Calverton is now law.

The bill, which Riverhead Supervisor Sean Walter has called “the single most important piece of economic development legislation for Long Island,” is seen as a key to the future redevelopment of the former Navy-owned property in Calverton, which was given to the town in 1998 for economic development to replace the jobs lost when the Grumman Corporation left the site in 1995.

Since that time, the town has only sold two pieces of the property it acquired, and much of the acreage remains undeveloped.

The fast track bill was signed into law Wednesday night, the last day Governor Andrew Cuomo had to act on it, according to Drew Biondo, a legislative aide to state Senator Ken LaValle (R-Port Jefferson), the bill’s sponsor in the state Senate.

Fried Theile (I-Sag Harbor), who represents the South Fork, sponsored the Assembly bill.

Mr. Walter said Mr. Thiele worked tirelessly on getting the bill passed.

“Without him this would not have happened,” Mr. Walter said. “Assemblyman Theile had something to do with every single draft of this legislation and there were probably more than 50 drafts. The residents of the Town of Riverhead owe Fred Thiele  a great debt of gratitude.

“And this is a in district from which he can’t get one vote,” Mr. Walter continued. “It’s a true testament of not only working across party lines but across district lines to promote what is good for both the East End and New York State. It’s wonderful that the South Fork has him as a legislator.”

Mr. LaValle called EPCAL “the last major economic development site in Suffolk County. For the town of Riverhead it means tax relief and for all of the East End, it will spur economic development and create jobs.”

The bill was approved by both houses of the legislature in June and was delivered to the governor’s desk on Oct. 11. From there, he had 10 days to either approve it or veto it, excluding Sundays.

However, had he taken no action, the bill would have automatically become law after the 10 day period, which ended Wednesday, officials said.

The bill establishes the EPCAL Reuse and Revitalization Area, a 2,124-acre area for which Riverhead Town will develop an overall generic environmental impact study (GEIS) outlining what can and can’t be built there.

After the GEIS is complete and approved, any fully engineered development proposal for projects within the area covered by the study will be guaranteed approval within 90 days of the application’s filing. If an application isn’t approved in that time frame, it will receive a default approval.

The town must first complete that study before the fast track plan can take effect, but the study has already began and is expected to be done next year sometime, according to Supervisor Sean Walter.

The study, done by VHB Engineering, will cost about $500,000, and includes zoning recommendations, a market study, an environment study and a 50-lot industrial subdivision map for the EPCAL property.

Once the subdivision is approved, town officials hope to be able to sell off smaller parcels of the land and begin to derive revenue off of it.

10/15/13 3:02pm
10/15/2013 3:02 PM
EPCAl in Riverhead, FAA

NEWS-REVIEW FILE PHOTO | A view of the EPCAL site from the sky.

A bill which passed both houses of the state legislature this past June, green-lighting a fast track plan for development proposals at Enterprise Park at Calverton, has been delivered to the desk of Gov. Andrew Cuomo and now awaits his signature.

According to Drew Biondo, spokesman for state Sen. Ken LaValle (R-Port Jefferson), Cuomo has 10 days from Friday to either approve or veto the legislation, which was sponsored by LaValle in the state senate and Assemblyman Fred Thiele in the lower house of the state legislature.

It received only one “no” vote in the state legislature, from Assemblyman Robert Sweeney (D-Lindenhurst), who is the chairman of the assembly’s environmental conservation committee. Still, Mr. LaValle and Riverhead Town officials said they didn’t feel the time lag between getting the bill approved in the legislature and getting it signed by the governor was indicative of a problem.

Rather, they said, the governor has hundreds of bills placed before him to act on, and this is a normal time frame for a bill. Officials said the governor was taking bills in batches of about 50 at a time.

A spokesperson for Governor Cuomo said the governor considers about 100 bills a week.

“Obviously, I would like it signed sooner than later but I don’t think there is a cause to be concerned at this point,” Riverhead Supervisor Sean Walter said in August. He could not immediately be reached for comment Tuesday.

When the bill was initially passed, Mr. Walter called the bill “the single biggest piece of economic development legislation for Long Island, probably ever,” adding that the language gives Riverhead an economic tool that no other area in the state has.

The bill establishes the EPCAL Reuse and Revitalization Area, a 2,124-acre area for which Riverhead Town will develop an overall generic environmental impact study (GEIS) outlining what can and can’t be built there.

The town is already in the process of doing that study, which will cost about $500,000 and is expected to take about a year to complete.

But once it is completed, any fully engineered development proposal for projects within the area covered by the study will be guaranteed approval within 90 days of the application’s filing.

If an application isn’t approved in that time frame, it will receive a default approval.

The bill can’t take effect until after the study is approved, Mr. Walter said, so the four-month wait for it to be signed by the governor will not impact the overall plan.

The town attempted to get the same bill passed in 2012, when it was approved in the state senate but never came up for a vote in the assembly.