02/04/13 5:51pm
02/04/2013 5:51 PM
TIM GANNON FILE PHOTO | Depleted beach along Creek Road in Wading River.

TIM GANNON FILE PHOTO | Depleted beach along Creek Road in Wading River.

Riverhead Town officials are hoping to rebuild part of the Long Island Sound beach in Wading River using sand dredged from Wading River Creek.

The Town Board on Tuesday is expected to approve a resolution transferring $10,000 from Federal Emergency Management Agency aid to hire a contractor to survey the current conditions in the creek and to determine the cost of the project. The town hopes to be reimbursed by FEMA for the entire cost of the project.

Superstorm Sandy left most of the beaches along Long Island Sound with far less sand than they previously had, and some of the homes along Creek Road in Wading River are now much closer to the water than they used to be.

“We have to find sand somewhere to try and protect some of those houses and we’re hoping some of it is still in that creek,” Supervisor Sean Walter said. “The creek didn’t really fill in during Sandy, but it is filling in now. It’s the only place I can think of where we are going to get some sand that’s not going to cost millions of dollars.

“And to the extent we can put it up on the beach and protect some of these houses, we’ll do it. But we’re not going to be able to protect them all.”

The cost of pumping sand from an offshore site could be in the millions, officials have said.

Mr. Walter raised this issue with state Department of Environmental Conservation commissioner Joseph Martens earlier this year at a Long Island Association breakfast, and was told the agency would look into it.

While the town’s efforts to dredge Wading River Creek in the past have been hampered by environmental regulations aimed at protecting nesting piping plovers and winter flounder, Mr. Walter says the town is seeking to do the dredging and beach restoration during the normal environmental windows when dredging is permitted.

The town will need DEC permission to modify its dredging permit to allow for the beach restoration, according to a DEC spokesperson.

“DEC issued a permit for maintenance dredging of Wading River Creek to the Town of Riverhead in 2004 which expires in February of 2014,” said DEC spokesperson Aphrodite Montalvo. “DEC received a request for a permit-modification following Hurricane Sandy from the town and is currently reviewing the request.

tgannon@timesreview.com

12/23/12 12:00pm
12/23/2012 12:00 PM

COURTESY PHOTO | One of the large FEMA-funded trucks at the town’s refuse and recyling center in Cutchogue collects storm debris for disposal in Brookhaven.

Just in time for Christmas, Riverhead and Southold towns have received a sizable gift from Uncle Sam.The many tons of tree limbs, tree trunks and other debris left behind by Hurricane Sandy no longer sit in huge piles, thanks to Suffolk County and the Federal Emergency Management Agency .

Smooth and speedy coordination among the town, county and federal governments resulted in the removal of 60,000 cubic yards of debris from the North Fork by way of tandem trucks at no cost to local taxpayers, said Jim Bunchuck, Southold’s solid waste coordinator.

“It was really perfect,” Mr. Bunchuck said. “This was all part of FEMA’s aid to the town. We didn’t even have to provide a payloader or anything to get the debris into the trucks because the trucks had their own great big shovels to load themselves.”

The trucks, which belong to a Missouri company, were contracted to take storm debris to the Brookhaven landfill, where FEMA has staged incinerators to burn the debris.

“We didn’t initially feel we would need help with the brush because we have our own compost area, but the amount of debris that came in ended up being overwhelmingly large,” Mr. Bunchuck said. “We processed a year’s worth of debris just in the month of November and we still have a lot of processed wood chips leftover from Irene.”

Although Southold Town has room to store the debris at the Cutchogue waste transfer station, Mr. Bunchuck said processing it would have taken a year.

“Normally brush can’t be burned, but because of the emergency declaration, burning it up in Brookhaven is allowed,” he said. “That’s saved us a big headache and allowed us to keep on top of the situation. It’s been a great benefit.”

Jack Naylor, director of utilities in Greenport Village , said Southold learned help was available from Riverhead Highway Superintendent George “Gio” Woodson.

Mr. Woodson said his crews calculated that 20,000 cubic tons of debris was trucked away from Riverhead Town alone.

“We had meetings with the county recovery team in Yaphank every day after the storm and they were the ones who initially gave us the choice to get our debris either ground up or trucked out to Brookhaven to be burned,” Mr. Woodson said. “I chose to have it trucked out, which took about three weeks.”

Just as the company finished in Riverhead, Mr. Bunchuck said he contacted Mr. Woodson to learn if Southold Town could benefit from their services.

“The trucks mobilized within 24 hours of being contacted,” Mr. Bunchuck said.

Mr. Naylor said he had a similar experience with the contractors, who arrived within hours of being contacted.

“I called at 9:30 a.m. on Friday and they were here at 12:30,” Mr. Naylor said. “They were here Friday, Saturday and Sunday and now they’re done. We saved a ton of money. It hasn’t cost us a dime.”

He said after the trucks completed their work in Greenport, they headed off to remove debris in Huntington.

“It’s been one of those things, like, serendipity,” Mr. Naylor said. “Someone made a call to Riverhead, then we found out and started making calls, too. It’s just been great coordination between the towns and the county.”

 gvolpe@timesreview.com

11/27/12 1:13pm
11/27/2012 1:13 PM
Hurricane Sandy, FEMA, Flanders, Southampton Town

TIM GANNON PHOTO | Several houses on Bay Avenue and other areas in Flanders suffered major damage during superstorm Sandy.

Officials from Southampton Town and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) have scheduled a meeting for Thursday to hear from residents in the Flanders area who suffered serious damage to their homes during superstorm Sandy.

The meeting will be held on Nov. 29 at 6 p.m. at the David Crohan Community Center on Flanders Road.

Town officials say the goal of the meeting is to better understand the needs of the community, what obstacles residents are encountering, and how FEMA and local officials can assist.

Southampton Town officials scheduled to attend including Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst, the planning and development administrator, Kyle Collins, the director of municipal works, Christine Fetten, and chief building inspector Michael Benincase.

Sandy damaged a number of houses in Flanders, some that have since been rendered not safe to live in, particularly in low lying areas such as Bay Avenue or the streets off the north part of Long Neck Boulevard, and adjacent streets.

Richard Naso, a member of the town’s citizen advisory committee for Flanders, Riverside and Northampton, has been trying to get word out about the meeting.

“You may have spoken to a FEMA representative already, but most people are unaware of other programs to help assist us,” he said. “It’s to your benefit to learn as much as possible and to receive the help, support and assistance from the Town of Southampton and FEMA.”

tgannon@timesreview.com

11/04/12 3:54pm
11/04/2012 3:54 PM

JOHN DUNN FILE PHOTO | Senator Charles Schumer announced Sunday federal aid is coming to local municipalities.

Local federal elected officials announced Sunday FEMA aid is now available to fund repairs for public infrastructures and facilities damaged this week by Hurricane Sandy.

According to a press released issued by U.S. Senator Charles Schumer’s office,  FEMA administrator Craig Fugate agreed to expand President Barack Obama’s major disaster declaration to include all categories of public assistance for the counties affected by the storm, including: roads, bridges, water control facilities, public buildings and equipment, utilities, parks, recreational facilities, beaches and more.

Initially, municipalities on Long Island and in New York City and the Hudson Valley were only eligible to receive federal aid for some public services like debris removal and emergency protective measures.

Residents in those areas have been eligible for individual assistance from FEMA.

Mr. Schumer and U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand applauded FEMA’s recent decision.

“It is critical that FEMA has heeded our call and expanded the major disaster declaration to include full public assistance for communities throughout storm-ravaged New York City, Long Island and the lower Hudson Valley,” Mr. Schumer said.

“Providing this full range of federal disaster assistance is essential for repairs to everything from sewages facilities, to parklands, to the hundreds of roads and bridges that were destroyed in the storm, and I am pleased that our communities can know that the federal government will be there to help as they continue their response and recovery efforts.”

Ms. Gillibrand agreed and described the damage she has seen as “devastating.”

“The federal government has a responsibility to stand with these families every step of the way to help them recover and rebuild better than ever before,” she said. “The Obama administration promised no red-tape, and this is another example of the president backing up that commitment.”

jennifer@timesreview.com

11/04/12 9:19am

GIANNA VOLPE PHOTO | Paradise Point, Southold.

Representatives from the Federal Emergency Management Agency will be on hand in a mobile trailer behind Southold Town Hall on Monday, Nov. 5 and Tuesday, Nov. 6 to help any residents in need of disaster assistance as a result of Hurricane Sandy.

FEMA employees will be available from 7 a.m.to 7 p.m.

Suffolk County received a major disaster declaration from the federal government on Oct. 30.

Residents who want to get a jump on applying for assistance can also go online to DisasterAssitance.gov or apply via smartphone at m.fema.gov. They can also call 1-800-462-7585.

Residents without insurance can apply for personal assistance with their housing needs, disaster-related medical and funeral expenses, clothing, household items, tools, fuel, clean-up items, damage to vehicles and moving expenses.

Those with homeowners and/or flood insurance can still receive FEMA assistance if their insurance settlement is delayed or is insufficient to meet their disaster-related needs.

They can also receive FEMA help if they’ve exhausted the additional living expenses provided by their insurance policies or if they cannot find rental housing.

Newsday reported today that FEMA has provided about $665,000 in cash assistance to 94 Suffolk County families.

Suffolk County Executive Steve Ballone urged residents affected to register with FEMA, which had a mobile center set up Saturday in Shirley.