06/08/15 10:25pm
06/08/2015 10:25 PM

A proposed garbage district for Flanders, Riverside and Northampton appears to be heading for the dumpster itself.

The Southampton Town Board is expected to vote Tuesday afternoon on a resolution to reject all eight bids it has received from garbage carting companies, Councilman Brad Bender said.

The Town Board doesn’t intend to seek new bids on the proposal, at least in the near future, and won’t proceed with the garbage district proposal this year, he said. The idea of a garbage district could still be revived in the future, perhaps in a wider area, but the plan won’t be revived anytime soon, he said.

(more…)

04/20/15 3:31pm
04/20/2015 3:31 PM
Garbage on Oak Avenue in Flanders. (Credit: barbaraellen Koch)

Garbage on Oak Avenue in Flanders. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch file photo)

If a controversial proposed garbage district in Flanders, Riverside and Northampton is going forward, the town will likely need to first re-bid it, according to Councilman Brad Bender of Northampton.

But that’s assuming the district is even moving forward, a decision that the Town Board will likely make some time after a public hearing on the proposal in mid-May, he said. (more…)

04/15/15 3:00pm
04/15/2015 3:00 PM
Kenny Alfano of Flanders voices his displeasure that Flanders Riverside Northampton Civic Association membership applications had not been processed in time for the monthly meeting Monday night. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

Kenny Alfano of Flanders voices his displeasure that Flanders Riverside Northampton Civic Association membership applications had not been processed in time for the monthly meeting Monday night. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

What’s stinky, inside everyone’s house and able to draw more people than ever — not to mention the police — to a Flanders, Riverside, and Northampton Community Association meeting?

Trash. (more…)

03/27/15 12:06pm
03/27/2015 12:06 PM

Refuse in woods along Oak Avenue in Flanders from 2012. (Credit: Tim Gannon, file)

A proposal to institute a garbage district in the hamlets of Flanders, Riverside and Northampton will be discussed before the Waters Edge Civic Association at 7 p.m. Friday at the Crohan Community Center in Flanders.

Christine Fetten, Southampton Town’s Director of Municipal Works, will be the speaker.

The proposal would have to be approved by property owners within the proposed district before it could take effect. Town officials have yet to determine when that vote would be.  (more…)

02/10/15 10:48am
02/10/2015 10:48 AM
Credit: GoogleMaps

Credit: GoogleMaps

The Flanders Riverside and Northampton Community Association will be holding its first annual 5K run/walk next month to raise money for a scholarship for local students.

The event will take place on Sunday, March 22 at Hampton Hills Golf and Country Club in Northampton, where the race will both start and finish. It’s open to all runners, joggers and walkers of all ages, according to FRNCA member Barbara Swislosky, who is organizing the race with FRNCA treasurer Patty Hopkins. (more…)

04/19/14 8:00am
04/19/2014 8:00 AM
Riverside foot bridge to Riverhead

GRAPHIC COURTESY JAY SCHNEIDERMAN | A possible footbridge that will cross the Peconic River and connect Riverside to downtown Riverhead.

As part of the recent efforts to revitalize the Riverside area, Southampton Town sent out a request for proposals last week for engineering and planning companies to design a proposed pedestrian bridge over the Peconic River. (more…)

04/18/14 10:30am
04/18/2014 10:30 AM
Route 24 in Riverside. Southampton Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst signed an agreement Tuesday with Plainview-based Renaissance Downtowns to lead planning and development efforts. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

Route 24 in Riverside. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch, file)

Southampton Town has signed a contract with a “master developer” as part of a multi-pronged approach of revitalizing the long-beleaguered Riverside area that’s just a short walk away from downtown Riverhead, which has made its own strides as of late.

The development firm, Renaissance Downtowns of Plainview, has also leased office space on Peconic Avenue and is advertising for local employees to man the office. (more…)

11/14/13 9:00am
11/14/2013 9:00 AM
JOSEPH PINCIARO PHOTO | Shirley Coverdale, right, speaks at a recent Flanders, Riverside, Northampton Community Association meeting.

JOSEPH PINCIARO PHOTO | Shirley Coverdale, right, speaks at a recent Flanders, Riverside, Northampton Community Association meeting.

How can a group of people organize to achieve a common goal?

That’s a question facing the Flanders, Riverside, Northampton Community Association — one that was addressed at the group’s monthly meeting Tuesday night.

Though it appears that the area will soon be represented on the Town Board for the first time in recent memory – Northampton resident Brad Bender held a 143-vote lead after Election Day, with nearly 900 absentee ballots to be counted – declining membership in its civic group remains a long-term issue, especially with projects of community concern looming on the horizon.

“The numbers continue to decline, but it still is a good-sized membership of paying community members,” said FRNCA president Vince Taldone. “To me, that alone wouldn’t upset me. My main concern is that people are not participating in the discussion about the community they live in.”

Mr. Taldone said Wednesday that over the past three years, membership in FRNCA — which asks a $20 annual fee of its members — has dropped from 130, to 115, to 90.

Tuesday night’s discussion centered on turning those numbers around.

Shirley Coverdale, who sits on the board of Long Island Organizing Network and was recently named a co-chair of the Suffolk County Democratic Committee’s newly formed Black and Hispanic Democratic Committee, also shared her experience in community organizing.

Ms. Coverdale has most recently been at Riverhead Town Hall to support a special zone that would permit construction of the Family Community Life Center – a multi-purpose facility proposed for land owned by First Baptist Church, where her husband, the Rev. Charles Coverdale, has been pastor for over 30 years. She told FRNCA members that over the past 20-plus years, as she and others have attempted to bring that project to fruition, it’s drawn over $1 million in donations.

“A funny thing happens when you organize people,” she said. “Money follows.”

Ms. Coverdale also shared an anecdote about 15 homeowners affected by torrential flooding that ruined homes in the Horton Avenue area in the spring of 2010.

Through a series of one-on-one face-to-face meetings, she said, personal connections formed to strengthen a core group of people, widen their reach and eventually attract $3.5 million in Federal Emergency Management Agency funds to compensate people whose homes were destroyed — quite a feat for such a small group, she noted.

In recent years, FRNCA leaders have helped draw resources to the area south of the Peconic River, including a Brownfields Opportunities Area grant of nearly $240,000 intended to spur revitalization in the Riverside area, which has 15 dormant, contaminated properties. Meanwhile sewer and traffic studies have also been in the works there, though Mr. Taldone said Tuesday that study after study could be part of the reason it’s hard to draw people to FRNCA meetings.

“Too many promises, too many studies for years and years,” Mr. Taldone said. “They lose faith. When I go to them, and say ‘This is amazing, and it’s happening now,’ they don’t even believe me.”

Northampton resident Chris Sheldon said that a decade ago, when Southampton Town was conducting a Riverside Revitalization Study, “we could have filled Phillips Avenue school.”

Moving forward, Mr. Sheldon suggested “finding new blood” and engaging those members of the community face-to-face.

Mr. Bender pointed to his Southampton Town Board campaign, noting that knocking on 2,000 doors and hearing people out in-person made the difference in what looks like an election victory

Speaking to an audience of no more than a dozen people, FRNCA leaders said Tuesday they’ll spend some of the organization’s limited funds on colored palm cards to have on hand when they speak to their neighbors in the future. And as the brownfields grant and other projects continue, they hope to see more locals come out and participate in the future of their community — at public meetings about the actual projects and at monthly FRNCA meetings.

“When the bulldozer is taking down buildings, maybe then people will believe what’s happening,” Mr. Taldone said. “But, by then, everything will be decided.”