07/30/13 12:08pm
07/30/2013 12:08 PM

BARBARAELLEN KOCH FILE PHOTO | Just two petitions have been challenged in Riverhead Town this election season.

Only Ann Cotten-DeGrasse, who is running a Democratic primary for Riverhead Town supervisor, and Mike Panchak, the Riverhead Republican Committee’s candidate for highway superintendent, have had specific objections filed against their nominating petitions for this fall’s town elections.

Since the deadline for filing objections has passed, that means there will be a Republican primary for Town Council in September, with Anthony Coates challenging committee nominees John Dunleavy and Jodi Giglio.

The challenge against Mr. Panchak came from Keisha Washington Dean, who is a member of the Riverhead Town Democratic Committee.

Ms. Dean claimed that since Mr. Panchak is not a registered Republican, he requires a certificate of authorization from the Republican leadership, and failed to get that certificate, sometimes called a “Wilson Pakula,” by the July 15 deadline.

“It’s still in the hands of the Board of Elections,” Mr. Panchak said.

He said he plans to run whether he’s on the Republican line or not because he’s still going to be on the Conservative line and no challenges were filed on his position there.

Mr. Panchak, who is challenging incumbent Democrat George ‘Gio’ Woodson, is not registered with a political party, and is listed as a “blank” by the Board of Elections.

“We missed the filing period to give him a Wilson Pakula,” said Republican vice chairman Mason Haas of Mr. Panchak. “Normally we would have caught this mistake. However, the distractions of late has unfortunately caused us to have missed the filing deadline for the Wilson Pakula and Mr. Panchak may be a casualty of that.

Ms. Cotten-DeGrasse, whose name appears on the ballot as Ellen A. Cotten-DeGrasse, filed 429 signatures, and three different people filed objections to them, including Ms. Washington Dean. Maxine Kleedorfer of Baiting Hollow also challenged all of Ms. Cotten’s petitions on the grounds that she listed her address incorrectly.  Jeanne Luboja of South Jamesport is the third person to file petitions against Ms. Cotten-DeGrasse.

Ms. Cotten-DeGrasse, who is challenging Democratic party nominee for Angela DeVito for supervisor, listed her address as 8 Legend Lane in Jamesport, although the town changed her address to 37 Legend Lane for the e-911 emergency phone system. In addition, since she gets mail delivered to a mailbox, her mailing address should be Legend Lane in Riverhead, since the Jamesport Post Office doesn’t deliver to mailboxes in front of homes.

The Board of Elections will rule on both cases in the coming weeks.

Mr. Coates said he filed general objections to the Republican petitions, through his girlfriend, Cleo Beletsis, but decided not to file specific objections because it would be too much of a distraction.

tgannon@timesreview.com

07/19/13 12:00pm
07/19/2013 12:00 PM

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Neighbors have been complaining about noise and ground shaking near Gershow Recycling on Hubbard Avenue.

Residents of the Riverhaven manufactured home park on Hubbard Avenue say noise from the adjacent Gershow Recycling business is shaking their homes.

Seeking some peace, residents there met with Riverhead Councilman John Dunleavy last Thursday in the meeting room of Riverwoods mobile home park in Riverside to voice their complaints. (Both parks are owned by Kingsley Management Corp. of Utah.)

“The ground vibrates over there,” said John Peck, who manages both parks. “I know it does because I was standing out there and I felt it. It was like an earthquake. It’s shaking the homes off their foundations. It’s actually causing things to fall off their walls. It’s not right. These people were here first.”

“I hear that big bang constantly,” said Richard Weiss, who lives on First Street in the park. “I live in a new home, it’s five years old, and it shakes the house.”

An attorney for Gershow said the company is aware of the complaints and is taking steps to address the noise problems.

Gershow Recycling, which is based in Medford and has a number of sites on Long Island, bought the former Fred J. Gallo Used Auto Parts site on Hubbard Avenue in 2012 to continue to operate an “end of life vehicle recycling facility,” as Gershow termed it on a state Department of Environmental Conservation application.

But nearby residents say there was never any noise when Gallo owned the site, whereas, since Gershow has taken over, they now hear loud booming sounds all the time.

In August 2012, the Riverhead Town planning department determined that Gershow’s plan to take over the Gallo site was “de minimus,” meaning it did not require a site plan application or a site plan amendment from the Planning Board.

The state DEC required Gershow to get a freshwater wetland permit, build a retaining wall and regrade the site to prevent rainwater runoff from going into Saw Mill Creek.

Peter Danowski, a Gershow attorney, said in an interview Tuesday that Gershow has already taken a step toward reducing the noise. The company had been using a crane with metal treads, which made a lot of noise on the concrete ground, and has just spend $367,000 for a new crane with rubber treads, Mr. Danowski said.

Greshow also plans to place metal containers along the property line to buffer the noise, Mr. Danowski said. If the containers don’t work, the company will try other solutions until it finds something that does work, he assured.

“We start with a couple of containers near a neighbor, and then talk to that neighbor and see if stopped the noise,” Mr. Danowski said.

Mr. Dunleavy told the Riverhaven residents that as long as Gershow is following town code, “there’s nothing we can do about this,” other than trying to level with them and have both sides agree to be good neighbors.

Recently released campaign finance disclosure filings show that both Mr. Dunleavy and Councilwoman Jodi Giglio received campaign contributions from Gershow’s owners.

Mr. Dunleavy said he plans to work with Gershow to resolve the noise problem for residents.

Gershow has received complaints about noise and shaking from neighbors of its Medford location as well, according to news reports from over 30 years ago.

In the late 1980s, residents near a Gershow facility in Medford said it caused their homes to shake, created noxious fumes and periodically “exploded” with a sound resembling an airplane crash, according to a Newsday article at the time.

Gershow later reached an out-of-court settlement with those residents, who had gone to state Supreme Court to stop the operation.

tgannon@timesreview.com

07/16/13 10:30am
07/16/2013 10:30 AM
Councilwoman Jodi Giglio

BARBARAELLEN KOCH FILE PHOTO | Riverhead Councilwoman Jodi Giglio.

UPDATE: Riverhead Councilwoman Jodi Giglio’s July 15 campaign finance disclosure forms have now been posted on the state Board of Elections website and, when combined with what she raised in the Jan. 15 reports, pull her ahead of fellow incumbent Republican Councilman John Dunleavy as having raised the most money for the coming town elections.

New July 15 reports were also posted Tuesday for Ann Cotten-DeGrasse, who is waging a Democratic primary for supervisor against  committee nominee Angela DeVito.

John Dunleavy of Riverhead

FILE PHOTO | Second-term Riverhead Councilman John Dunleavy in Town Hall.

Reports for North Fork state Assembly candidates Tony Palumbo, the Republican candidate, and Democrat John McManmon, are also now available.

Ms. Giglio’s July 15 filings report contributions of $17,309 and spending at $20,771.

In January, she reporting raising $22,755 and spending $13,055.

By comparison, Mr. Dunleavy raised $25,430 in July and spent $16,220, but in January, he only raised $500, and spent $2,395.

Thus, the combined totals for the two filings show Ms. Giglio having raised  $40,064 and spent $33,826, and Mr. Dunleavy having raised $25,930 and spent  $18,615.

Among the contributions Ms. Giglio received in the July filings were $500 from Saber Riverhead, which is building a new shopping center on Route 58; $840 from Mainstream House on Sound Avenue in Riverhead; $500 from West RAC contracting of Hauppauge; $500 from Kevin Gershowitz of Gershow Recycling; $500 from M-GBC LLC, which is a company headed by Jan Burman that owns land at EPCAL, and $630 from East End Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery of East Main Street.

Among Ms. Giglio’s expenditures were $3,000 to Outerbanks — a restaurant run by her husband at Suffolk County’s Indian Island Country Club — for fundraiser and $200 for snow removal for about 100 spaces at Outerbanks, according to the filing.

She also paid $989 to Campaigns Unlimited of Shirley for fundraiser invitations and professional services, and $1,378 to GMG Printing and Marketing Resources of Shirley for fundraiser invitations.

Mr. Dunleavy paid $729 to Minute Man Press of Riverhead for fundraising and $10,850 to the Baiting Hollow Club for fundraisers.

On the snow removal for Outerbanks, Ms. Giglio said Tuesday the job was needed to clear space for people attending a Feb. 12 fundraiser there, a day after the Blizzard of 2013 struck the region.

“The county employees were not coming to clear the parking lot that night, as they normally would, so I had to pay so the people coming to my fundraiser could have somewhere to park,” Ms. Giglio explained.

She also said the $3,000 checks for the Outerbanks fundraiser actually went to a catering company called Strategic Maneuvers, which was hired to help run the February fundraiser.

Supervisor Sean Walter’s January reports show only $6,100 raised and $1,085 spent. He was running for a county Legislature seat at the time.

Ms. Cotten DeGrasse, meanwhile raised $3,765 and spent $1,262, according to the July 15 reports.

The state Assembly race is close in the fundraising department

Mr. Palumbo raised $24,785 and spent $8,678, while Mr. McManmon raised $21,425 and spent $2,671.

Ms. Giglio’s rival in a Republican primary, Anthony Coates, reported raising $5,275 and spending $4,631. His campaign spending included $1,698 to the Riverhead Project for a fundraiser and $515 to PDQ Print of Taylor, Penn. for campaign brochures, according to the July 15 filings.

He also paid an AT&T cell phone bill out of campaign funds, according to the report.

(Scroll down for a complete roundup.)

JULY 16 STORY: The first campaign finance disclosure forms of the political season were due Monday, and Riverhead Councilman John Dunleavy is way out in front of everybody so far, with more than $25,430 raised between Jan 15 and July 15.

In the supervisor race, incumbent Republican Sean Walter is leading Democratic challenger Angela DeVito in the money-raising department, $18,077 to $13,930.

The reports, which are filed electronically and posted on the state Board of Elections website, were due Monday, although some candidates didn’t report any contributions or didn’t file on time.

John Conklin, a BOE spokesman, said workers there are filing the reports as they receive them, but that anything received after 5 p.m. Monday will not be posted until Tuesday, although anything received  up until midnight Monday would not be considered late.

If a candidate is more than five days late, the BOE could launch a lawsuit against that person, and could possibly fine them up to $1,000, Mr. Conklin said.

Mr. Dunleavy and primary challenger Anthony Coates were the only town council candidates to have filed the July 15 reports on the state site so far, but Republican Councilwoman Jodi Giglio had reported $22,755 raised in the Jan. 15 reports.

Among some of the larger contributions for Mr. Dunleavy were $1,000 from town building inspector Sharon Klos; $1,000 from Mainstram House, an alcohol rehab center on Sound Avenue; $900 each from Riverhead Ford Lincoln and Mattituck Sanitation; $737 apiece from Kevin and Marnie Gershowitz, of Gershow Recycling; $500 from Ron DeVito, who is proposing an assisted living project on Mill Road, and $675 from Jefferson Consultants, headed by Mark Lyons of Port Jefferson, who is working on that project as well; $500 from Giorgio’s Catering in Baiting Hollow; $900 from Bob Scheiner of H2M Engineering; $900 from builder Richard Wiedersum of Wiedersum Associates; and $900 from Jaral Riverhead, which owns the Holiday Inn Express on Route 58.

Mr. Dunleavy, a retired town police officer who was re-elected to a second term in 2009, said almost all of his contributions came from a golf fundraiser he held on July 9.

He said he thinks he received the support because people are happy with the job he’s done, not because they are looking for favors from the town.

“I work with everybody,” he said. “I don’t care if you give me $100 or you give me nothing. A lot of people gave me nothing but I work with them.”

Mr. Walter’s biggest contribution came from the Riverhead Republican Committee, which gave him $3,000. He also got $1,000 from George Regini of Giorgio’s Catering; $1,000 from Suffolk County Probation Officers; $500 from Apple Honda owner Irwin Garsten, who is seeking to build a shopping center next to Riverhead Centre on Route 58; and $500 from West RAC contracting of Hauppauge. He also got $500 from Green World Marketing of Northport and he reported $2,985 in contributions under $100 from a July 9 event. Those contributions are not required to be reported by name.

Ms. DeVito, (who is not related to the aforementioned Ronald DeVito) worked with a builder’s union for many years and received a lot of campaign contributions from unions, including $1,000 apiece from the Political Action League of two Ironworkers’s unions and $500 apiece from  a Sheetmetal Workers union PAC and from Bricklayers Local Union 1.

Ms. DeVito also got $705 from Paulette DeVito of Rocky Point; $500 from Amy and Jim Csorny of Wading River, who had been in court with the town over breach access disputes; and $300 from George and Christine Prete of Flanders. Ms. Prete had served with Ms. DeVito on the Riverhead Board of Education.

Among the larger contributors to Ms. Giglio’s campaign in the Jan. 15 report were $1,000 from Irwin Garsten; $800 from engineer Dennis Kelleher of H2M, which has worked for the town for many years; $525 from Henry Chlupsa, the president of consulting firm Dvirka and Bartilucci; and $500 apiece from Syp Industries of Manorville; $500 from Sypher Construction of Manorville, and Bench Strength Partners of Floral Park.

Mr. Coates’ biggest contribution was $1,000 from Stacey Polites and $500 from Lia Polites, who is one of the owners of the Jedediah Hawkins Inn. He also received $500 from Mainstream House.

The Riverhead Republican committee got a $250 donation from Ronald DeVito, but most of its contributions were not larger than $200.

The Riverhead Democratic Committee had not filed the July 15 report, but the Jan. 15 report showed the Democrats owed $6,862.

There were no campaign committees listed for Riverhead Democratic council candidates Millie Thomas and Bill Bianchi.

Anne Cotten DeGrasse, who is challenging Ms. DeVito in a primary for the Democratic supervisor nod, had a committee but did not report any campaign finance activity.

tgannon@timesreview.com

More by the numbers:

Friends of Sean Walter

raised $18,077

spent  $16,239

Angela DeVito for Supervisor

raised $13,930

spent $9,956

Friends of John Dunleavy

raised $25,430

spent $16,220

Vote Coates 13 (Anthony Coates)

raised $5,275

spent $4,631

Riverhead Republican Committee

raised $6,115

spent  $7,172

Riverhead Town Democratic Committee

raised $6,205

spent $5,548

Councilwoman Jodi Giglio

July

raised $17,309

spent $20,771

January

raised $22,755

spent $13,055

Councilman John Dunleavy

July

raised $25,430

spent $16,220

January

raised $500

spent $2,395

Ann Cotten-DeGrasse

raised $3,765

spent $1,262

Tony Palumbo

raised $24,785

spent $8,678

John McManmon

raised $21,425

spent $2,671

05/23/13 9:29pm

JENNIFER GUSTAVSON PHOTO | Riverhead Republican nominees, from left, Mike Panchak, Laverne Tennenberg, John Dunleavy, Sean Walter, Anthony Palumbo and Jodi Giglio.

It’s Sean Walter vs. Angela DeVito for Riverhead Town Supervisor.

The incumbent Republican Mr. Walter and the Democrat and former school board president Ms. Devito received the nominations of their respective parties Thursday night.

Despite having twice won elections for Town Supervisor, Mr. Walter wasn’t a guaranteed nominee. Assessor Mason Haas and Councilman Jim Wooten had both screened with party officials, but come Thursday both had backed off plans to oppose the sitting supervisor.

Mr. Haas even went so far as to nominate Mr. Walter, who promised to “be a better supervisor.” When asked if he was surprised by the support shown to him Thursday, Mr. Walter admitted he hasn’t always been a friend to everyone in the party.

“I think it’s very easy to lose sight of the people that got you elected and by reconnecting with the committee and finding out what their needs and concerns are to get renominated brings you back to your roots,” Mr. Walter said.

“In my zeal to get things done I ran over a lot of people,” he added.

Mr Wooten said that’s just how things are.

“There are no friends in politics,” he said. “We can’t afford to look back. We have to look forward.”

TIM GANNON PHOTO | Riverhead Town Democratic nominees, from left, Icilio ‘Bill’ Bianchi, Millie Thomas, Angela DeVito and Greg Fischer.

Ms. DeVito was nominated with the unanimous support of the Democratic screening committee, though current Riverhead school board president Ann Cotten-DeGrasse and Greg Fischer of Calverton received support from the floor. Ms. DeVito easily won the nomination, though.

She said recent votes give her hope she can win the election.

“This is the year,” she said. “The thing I learned in the Obama campaign and the Krupski campaign is that we Democrats can win. I got three calls for Sean Walter this year. He is scared. He is worried about the Democratic slate … we are going to bring the people together.”

Ms. DeVito, 64, is a member and former president of the Jamesport-South Jamesport Civic Association and is retired from her position as director of workforce development with the Long Island Building Trades Council.

Icilio “Bill” Bianchi and Millie Thomas received the Democratic nominations for Town Council. George “Gio” Woodson received the nomination for re-election as Highway Superintendent. Mr. Fischer later received the Democratic nomination for Assessor.

Mr. Bianchi, 82, is a former New York State Assemblyman who used to live in Bellport and now lives in Riverhead and owns a greenhouse on Doctors Path, where he grows orchids.

Ms. Thomas, 62,  is a real estate broker and owner of Landmark Realty in Wading River.

As expected, incumbent Republican council members Jodi Giglio and Jon Dunleavy were nominated for re-election. No other designations were made. Afterward Anthony Coates, who had screened with GOP officials, said he’s going to move forward with a primary campaign.

“I am running for the town board to propose new policy,” he said. “I am running to offer fresh ideas and to be a new voice.”

Laverne Tennenberg received the GOP nomination for re-election as assessor, while Mike Panchak was nominated to oppose incumbent Democrat George “Gio” Woodson for Highway Superintendent.

Riverhead Democrats voted to support John McManmon of Jamesport for the vacant state Assembly seat, though the move was met with controversy. While he’s registered to vote at his parents’ address in Jamesport, some Democrats, led by Greg Fischer of Calverton said he lives in New York City.

Mr. McManmon, an attorney in Manhattan, told the News-Review he does live in Brooklyn during the week for work purposes but has always voted here.

Brookhaven and Southold Democrats still have to choose a nominee for Assembly at their town conventions next week.

Republicans announced earlier Thursday that they will support New Suffolk attorney Anthony Palumbo for Assembly.

ORIGINAL STORY

Rootin’ for Wooten for Supervisor? Have a hankering for some Haas?

Sorry, this doesn’t appear to be your year after all.

GOP sources said Thursday that Riverhead Town Councilman Jim Wooten and Assessor Mason Haas have both backed down from their intent to run for Town Supervisor. Instead, sources have confirmed, incumbent Supervisor Sean Walter, 46, is expected to get the support of the Republican Committee at tonight’s nominating convention at Polish Hall.

The same sources said Thursday that incumbent council members Jodi Giglio and John Dunleavy will also get nominations for re-election, as has been expected.

Mr. Wooten, 53, stopped short of saying he’s no longer interested in running for supervisor, but he did say he’s in favor of party unity.

“The convention is tonight, and you never know what will happen,” Mr. Wooten said. “But I think the Republican Party is poised to stand together and unify their choices, and as far as my pulling out, I’m going to do what’s best for the party.” He declined to say if that meant he would not challenge Mr. Walter in a primary.

Mr. Haas, 55, could not be immediately reached for comment Thursday. Riverhead GOP chairman John Galla declined comment.

Town Board hopeful Anthony Coates, 52, appears poised to wage a primary battle in the likely event he fails to earn a nomination over Ms. Giglio, 44, and Mr. Dunleavy, 72.

“It’s a decision I will make in the aftermath of the convention, but I am strongly leaning in that direction,” he said.

The GOP convention at Polish Hall is scheduled for 7 p.m., the same time Democrats will gather at the nearby VFW Hall.

The Riverhead Democratic screening committee is recommending Angela DeVito for Supervisor, and Icilio “Bill” Bianchi and Millie Thomas for council, according to Democratic chair Marge Acevedo. The screening process took more than 35 hours, and they screened four people for supervisor and seven for council, she said.

The screening committee recommendations don’t always get the support of the full committee, as was the case two years ago.

Ms. DeVito, 64, is a former Riverhead Board of Education president, a member and former president of the Jamesport-South Jamesport Civic Association and is retired from her position as director of workforce development with the Long Island Building Trades Council.

Mr. Bianchi, 82, is a former New York State Assemblyman who used to live in Bellport and now lives in Riverhead and owns a greenhouse on Doctors Path, where he grows orchids.

Ms. Thomas, 62,  is a real estate broker and owner of Landmark Realty in Wading River.

tgannon@timesreview.com

05/23/13 9:28pm

NEWS-REVIEW FILE PHOTO | Riverhead Town Board members (from left) Jim Wooten, John Dunleavy, Supervisor Sean Walter, Jodi Giglio and George Gabrielsen.

Riverhead Town Republicans and Democrats both hosted their nominating conventions in Polish Thursday night. Read a recap of our live reports below:

03/13/13 12:00pm
03/13/2013 12:00 PM

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Town historian Georgette Case (right) rings the brass bell as (from left) town clerk Diane Wilhelm, councilmen Jim Wooten and John Dunleavy, and Supervisor Sean Walter look on Wednesday morning.

Town historian Georgette Case stood outside the front doors to Town Hall Wednesday morning, vigorously ringing a brass bell and announcing, “Here Ye, Here Ye, Here Ye! It’s 9:30 o’clock. The stage has arrived from Albany with great news on the 13th of March, 1792.”

After celebrating the 220th anniversary of the establishment of Riverhead Town last year, Ms. Case proposed making it an annual celebration. So this year marked the first of what will be an annual reading of the law that established the Town of Riverhead.

The act in came to pass after residents of Southold Town complained of their town being “too long.”

“WHERAS many of the freeholders and inhabitants of Southold in Suffolk county have presented to the legislature, that their town is so long, that it is inconvenient for them to attend at town meetings and also to transact the other necessary business of the said town; and have prayed that the same may be divided into two towns,” the act said.

At the ceremony Wednesday in front of a handful of media members, Supervisor Sean Walter said, “We have succeeded to secede.”

photo@timesreview.com

03/07/13 6:00am
03/07/2013 6:00 AM
Suffolk theater

KATHARINE SCHROEDER PHOTO | The theater marquis and the sky above downtown Riverhead.

To the Editor:

It was with great pride that I attended the opening night of the newly renovated Suffolk Theater Saturday.

Upon arrival to Main Street, I was immediately brought back to the 1930s. Out front, oscillating spotlights, vintage autos, a red carpet and doormen transported guests to another era, a vision of the past with all the great indications of a grand future for Main Street.

It was difficult not to feel as if I were back in time in this beautifully refurbished theater. While the original décor was preserved, the functionality of this theater has been modernized to state-of-the-art. No longer is it just a movie theater. Tier seating throughout the theater replaced the stagnant seats with a nod to cabaret theater and foreshadowing the high-end productions that owners Bob and Dianne Castaldi envision to implement with the highly talented artistic team led by executive director Bob Spiotto and a new group of creative employees to breathe 24-hour life into our Main Street revitalization momentum.

But back to the future, or should I say back to the past. A full orchestra played on the stage and the dance floor was full of people enjoying the music of the 1930s and 1940s. Young women dressed as “flappers” and men in zoot suits with wide-brim hats mingled among the cigarette girls, G-men, Keystone cops and VIPs in traditional tuxedos.

All to the backdrop of the traditional art deco theater details, a masterpiece and important testament to Riverhead’s great history as the cultural center for the East End and Long Island. Every last detail was set to re-create the mood for this evening, down to a cheeky statue of Marilyn Monroe from the classic movie “Bus Stop” over a subway grate with the air blowing her skirt up.

In another corner, Humphrey Bogart in his classic look from the movie “Casablanca” looked on with approval. From the marquis on the outside, this may seem to be just a movie theater but on the inside it is so much more. From the ticket booth at the entrance with the original tile floor, you would think you were entering the old theater.

Until the theater doors open. Inside lies the new Riverhead.

JOHN DUNLEAVY, CALVERTON

To read all of the Letters to the Editor, pick up a copy of the News-Review on newsstands or click on the E-Paper.

12/27/12 8:00am
12/27/2012 8:00 AM

BARBARAELLEN KOCH FILE PHOTO | Riverhead councilwoman Jodi Giglio, right, and Supervisor Sean Walter, center, didn’t always agree in 2012.

There were some public apologies made in 2012 after disputes within the all-Republican Riverhead Town Board.

After a simmering feud between Supervisor Sean Walter and Councilwoman Jodi Giglio boiled over in June with a Walter tirade in Town Hall, it was the supervisor who apologized during a Town Board meeting days later for “being out of line” for screaming and cursing at Ms. Giglio. According to several accounts, Mr. Walter lost his temper with the councilwoman while suspecting her of working behind his back to get his friend and adviser, Anthony Coates, banned from town cars and Town Hall.

Ms. Giglio called the public apology “nice,” but never said she accepted it. She later filed a harassment complaint against Mr. Walter with town police, though she reportedly asked for no charges to be filed and requested the report “for documentation purposes.”

Things quieted down for awhile — at least publicly — until three council members, Ms. Giglio, James Wooten and George Gabrielsen, pulled a controversial resolution off the floor, meaning it wasn’t on the agenda, at a Nov. 7 Town Board meeting.

The resolution called for the sudden firing of Town Board coordinator Linda Hulse, whom Ms. Giglio said lost some councilmembers’ trust.

“This is an evil act right here,” Mr. Walter said of the measure, lamenting the fact that Ms. Hulse was never told ahead of time.

“How many other employees are you planning to fire this way?“

Mr. Walter tried to stall the vote and sway some minds as the board argued publicly for over an hour, but to no avail. The move passed 3-2.

Mr. Dunleavy, who voted against the firing, said he was never informed of the plan and said Mr. Hulse should have been told, too.

“This is a coward’s position to let them go without talking to them,” he said.

Mr. Dunleavy then accused Mr. Wooten of being “rude” ever since he got elected. “That’s not true,” Mr. Wooten responded.

At the start of the next week’s more cordial Town Board work session, a regretful Mr. Wooten apologized for the way the firing was handled.

“I was reminded last night it was very unprofessional,” he said, choking up a bit. “It wasn’t businesslike, and for that, I’m sorry.”

Ms. Giglio and Mr. Gabrielsen offered no apologies.

At an event in Jamesport that same night, where Mr. Coates announced plans to run for Town Board in 2013, Mr. Walter said “Giglio is toast.”

mwhite@timesreview.com