06/18/13 6:06pm
06/18/2013 6:06 PM
JENNIFER GUSTAVSON PHOTO | Riverhead Republican nominees, from left,

JENNIFER GUSTAVSON FILE PHOTO | Riverhead Republican nominees, from left, Mike Panchak, Laverne Tennenberg, John Dunleavy, Sean Walter, Anthony Palumbo and Jodi Giglio.

Anthony Coates, who’s running a primary for a Riverhead council seat, is accusing town Republican committee leadership of threatening members who carry nominating petitions for him.

Candidates in Riverhead Town need signatures from 380 registered Republicans in order to get on the primary ballot.

A letter from recently appointed Riverhead Republican vice chairman Mason Haas, which was sent to committee members and forwarded to the media by Mr. Coates, reads as follows:

“As per the Chairperson, all committee members are reminded that they are only to carry the petitions of those nominated by the committee. Anyone doing otherwise would face disciplinary actions by the county committee. Along with possible dismissal as a committee person.”

Ms. Haas confirmed he sent the letter, and said his comments reflect a policy of the county Republican committee.

But Suffolk County Republican chairman John Jay LaValle said in an interview Tuesday that this isn’t exactly the case.

“It’s not necessarily true that if a committee member is supporting one Republican over another Republican that this would be an actionable situation,” Mr. LaValle said. “If a committee person was carrying the petitions of a Democrat, or member of some other party running against our party, that would clearly be actionable.”

“Actionable” could mean that person’s removal from the committee, he said, adding that while it would be “frowned upon” for a committee member to carry petitions against the committee’s candidates, it wouldn’t necessarily involve disciplinary procedures.

But Mr. Coates says this is the type of thing he’s running against.

“Did that really come from Republican headquarters? Or was it Berlin 1941?” Mr. Coates wrote in a letter to local media.

The Republicans nominated incumbents John Dunleavy and Jodi Giglio for the council seats, and Mr. Coates, who changed his registration to Republican only last year, is running a primary for one of those seats.

Mr. Coates says he began collecting signatures on June 4, the first day petition forms were available from the Board of Elections, and now has more than 500 signatures.

The Republican committee leaders, on the other hand, were “a little late” in handing out their petitions due to “unforeseen circumstances” and didn’t start until this week, according to town GOP chairman John Galla.

He said they usually hand out the petitions at their annual golf tournament, but that was rained out. In addition, he said, the petitions they received from Suffolk County didn’t have the voter enrollment books attached.

Mr. Coates called the delay in gathering signatures for nominees “sheer laziness” on the part of Republican leadership.

“This is an example of the type of complacency and right of entitlement and taking the voters for granted that I’m running against,” he said. “I want to be represented in Town Hall by the person who does their homework first. This is a metaphor for how they will govern.”

Petition signatures are dated and, under Board of Elections rules, if someone signs Mr. Coates’ petition first and then signs the Republican committee’s petition, which includes the names of all candidates nominated for town office, then the signatures on the second petition could be challenged and possibly thrown out, as least for the council nominees. In effect, although nominees for other offices would be unaffected, neither of the Republican council nominees (Mr. Dunleavy and Ms. Giglio) would receive credit for that signature because it would be unclear which of them the signer intended to support.

The BOE says they would only review such discrepancies if someone raised a challenge.

Because of this, Mr. Coates said, both Mr. Dunleavy and Supervisor Sean Walter are carrying blank petitions with only their own names on them, so they won’t be thrown out if the signer also signed Mr. Coates’ petition.

Mr. Walter gave a different story. He said he is carrying the petitions of the Conservative party, which endorsed the entire Republican slate except Ms. Giglio.

In order to carry petitions, one must be a registered member of the party for whom they are collecting petitions, or a notary public. Mr. Walter, a registered Republican, said he is also a notary.

Mr. Dunleavy also denied carrying petitions with only his name on it, but said he considered carrying petitions for the entire Republican slate with Ms. Giglio’s name whited out, but decided not to when he learned that these petitions would be counted separately from those with the full committee slate.

Mr. Dunleavy said he is now carrying just the petitions of the full Republican slate.

“He just wants to stir the pot,” he said of Mr. Coates.

Mr. Dunleavy said Tuesday that he only began collecting petitions Monday, in his own neighborhood. He said he knocked on two doors and both people said they had already signed Mr. Coates’ petition.

He got into a lengthy discussion about a town issue with one of the residents, he said, and had to go to a town function after that, so he never got any further.

“It’s harder to collect petitions when you’re in office,” he said, because of the town issues that need attention.

tgannon@timesreview.com

05/23/13 9:15pm

TIM KELLY PHOTO | New Suffolk Attorney Anthony Palumbo has secured the GOP nomination for state Assembly.

More than two months after Dan Losquadro left office to run the Brookhaven Town Highway Department, local Republicans have finally identified their choice to replace him in the New York State Assembly.

Anthony Palumbo, 42, an attorney from New Suffolk, has secured the GOP nomination, according to Suffolk County Republican chairman John Jay LaValle.

“He screened very well and has a great grasp of the issues, but what really pushed him over the top is his background as a former prosecutor and head of the [District Attorney's] East End Bureau.,” Mr. LaValle said. “Considering all the corruption scandals going on in the New York State Assembly, having someone like Tony Palumbo up there sends a very strong message.

“I’m certain that it won’t be high on Sheldon Silver’s to-do list, but there is no question the state Assembly needs to enact better anti-corruption measures and ethics reforms. Corruption equals waste, and waste equals higher taxes, and people are not in the position to tolerate corrupt politicians who are going to increase their taxes.”

Mr. Palumbo said recent scandals in Albany were also his biggest reason for running.

“The primary reason is the corruption and nonsense going on in Albany,” he said. “It’s to the point here we’re all a little disappointed with them.”

A graduate of St. John’s Law, Mr. Palumbo and his wife, Tracy, live in New Suffolk with their son, Ryan, 9, and Madeline, 6.

He said the challenge of working in the minority in the Assembly does not concern him, since he senses many people are frustrated with the status quo.

“From a lot of the comments made after the recent arrests of state legislators … cleaning up Albany appears to be a universal theme,” he said. “We have to start somewhere.

Mr. Palumbo practices law in Mattituck with Bill Goggins, who earlier this week received the support of the Southold Town GOP for a run at a town justice seat. Mr. Palumbo said he believes he can bring something new to the North Fork and to Albany.

“As a new face to the whole [political] landscape, I can hopefully be a breath of fresh air to the voting public,” he said.

The Suffolk GOP had met last Tuesday in Holtsville, but held off on naming a candidate for the Second Assembly district until today.

The GOP had screened a number of candidates, including Southold Councilman Chris Talbot, former Ed Romaine aide Bill Faulk of Manorville, Southold Trustee Bob Ghosio, Mattituck attorney Stephen Kiely, Mount Sinai attorney Raymond Negron and John Kreutz, Brookhaven Town deputy receiver of taxes. Mr. Talbot opted not to seek re-election to the Southold Town Board this year.

Democratic contenders include Cutchogue winery owner Jim Waters of Manorville, Riverhead attorney John McManmon, Rocky Point attorney Jennifer Maertz, East End Arts director Pat Snyder of Jamesport, Suffolk Park Police officer Tom Schiliro of Manorville and Riverhead attorney Ron Hariri.

Suffolk’s Democrats gathered Monday night, but rather than select an Assembly candidate the party took the unusual step of putting the choice in the hands of the Brookhaven, Riverhead and Southold committees. The 2nd Assembly District extends from north central Brookhaven east to Fishers Island.

TIM GANNON PHOTO | Attorney John McManmon was the Riverhead Democrats’ choice for Assembly Thursday night.

Riverhead’s Democrats met first, holding their convention Thursday night, and offering their support for Mr. McManmon.

There has been a backlash over Mr. McManmon’s candidacy based on his residency. Mr. McManmon, 28, worked for a Manhattan law firm called Millbank, Tweed, Hadley and McCoy,  and his address is listed as that of his parents in Aquebogue, although some have said he lives at an apartment on Dean Street in Brooklyn.

He said Thursday that although he lives in Brooklyn during the week for work purposes, he still votes here.

Mr. McManmon’s father, James, is an attorney who works for OTB and who has made three unsuccessful runs at a state assembly seat. His mother, Jeanne O’Rourke, is a deputy commissioner for the Board of Elections.

“If you check with the Board of Elections, John has been registered from his family address since he was 18,” Riverhead Democratic committee chair Marge Acevedo said. “His job is in New York City and he travels back and forth.  His residency should not be in question at all.”

Brookhaven Democrats meet May 28 and Southold’s committee meets May 29 and a candidate will not be announced until then.

Ms. Maertz, who twice ran unsuccessfully for a state Senate seat, is the only candidate with prior political experience.

Southold Democratic Chairman Art Tillman said Thursday that Glenn Friedman of South Jamesport has also thrown his hat into the ring for the Democrats’ 2nd Assembly District nomination.

Mr. LaValle said Governor Andrew Cuomo put in a certificate of necessity for a special election in  New York City, but not on Long Island, so it would seem that there will be no special date for the Assembly seat and the election will be held in November.

tkelly@timesreview.com

11/30/12 12:25pm
11/30/2012 12:25 PM

ROBERT O’ROURK FILE PHOTO | Senator Ken LaValle speaks with News 12 at the GOP election night gala at Emporium in Patchogue. Mr. LaValle secured 60 percent of the vote this year in his 18th re-election bid.

Late on the evening of Nov. 6, 1990, Senator Ken LaValle hung up the phone at his campaign headquarters in Selden and looked out at his crowd of supporters.

He had just received a concession call from his opponent that year, Sherrye Henry, a TV political talk show host who spent a whopping $500,000 to unseat the then 14-year senator.

Ms. Henry had received just 34 percent of the vote.

To this day, political pundits and newspaper scribes say the East Hampton resident, with roots in Memphis, Tenn., and New York City, put up the toughest fight against Mr. LaValle of any of the 19 opponents he faced since he first ran for office in 1976.

Yet she didn’t come close.

The election success of Mr. LaValle, 73, who come January will share the distinction of being the longest-tenured senator in New York, is nearly unparalleled among state senators in the U.S.

When Mr. LaValle is sworn in for his 19th term in January, Republican William Doyle of Vermont will be the only active state senator in the nation to have served more terms. Mr. Doyle, 86, was first elected to his post in 1968 and won a 23rd term earlier this month.

In all, six state senators across the U.S. will have been in office longer than Mr. LaValle as of January, though five of them serve in states where they have to run only once every four years. Democrat Fred Risser of Wisconsin is the longest-tenured state senator in the U.S., having been first elected in 1962 after serving six years in the Wisconsin State Assembly.

That means that of the 1,971 state senators serving in this country next year, only Mr. Doyle, Mr. Risser, Democrat Chuck Colgan of Virginia, Democrat Douglas Henry of Vermont and Democrats Norman Stone and Mike Miller of Maryland have been in office longer than Mr. LaValle.

They tried, they lost

“I certainly was circumspect about my chances to win, but there was a part of me at that time that thought it might be possible.” 

— Ira Costell, LaValle opponent, 1986 

It’s been 100 years since a Democrat was elected to represent New York’s 1st Senatorial District. Thomas H. O’Keefe of Oyster Bay won the post by 2,355 votes over Republican George L. Thompson on Nov. 5, 1912. The anti-Tammany Democrat was one of just 12 senators in 1913 to vote against the impeachment of Governor William Sulzer, who remains the only New York State governor ever to be impeached.

Mr. O’Keefe did not seek re-election in 1914 and was replaced by his opponent in the previous election.

Mr. Thompson spent the next 26 years in office, beginning an era of Republican domination that has continued through this month’s re-election of Mr. LaValle. The senator’s most recent opponent, Bridget Fleming of Sag Harbor, who gained just under 40 percent of the vote, actually fared better than any other opponent in a LaValle re-election bid.

In the past century, only eight Democrats have received a higher percentage of the 1st District vote than Ms. Fleming did this year.

One of those candidates was longtime Stony Brook University physicist Barry McCoy, who received 42.55 percent of the vote in 1976, the year Mr. LaValle was first elected. Mr. McCoy, who Mr. LaValle called the “greatest tactician” he’s ever faced, made a name for himself in 1974, at the height of the Watergate Scandal, when he led the first Democratic takeover of the Brookhaven Town Board, Mr. LaValle said.

“It was like I was playing chess with him,” the senator recalled in an interview this week. “He’d make a remark [at a campaign event] like ‘I’ve got 200 volunteers working for me.’ I’d say to my staff, ‘We need to have 201 volunteers.’ ”

SUFFOLK TIMES FILE PHOTO | Ken LaValle as he appeared during his 1976 bid to obtain the seat formerly held bu his good friend Leon Giuffreda, for whom he served as chief aide.

Mr. LaValle was 37 years old when he first sought public office in 1976. A teacher and school administrator in the Middle Country School District in the 1960s, he went on to serve as an aide to his predecessor, Leon Giuffreda. In that capacity, Mr. LaValle served as executive director of the Senate committee on education and the joint legislative committee on mental and physical handicaps.

In the Suffolk Times’ 1976 voter guide, Mr. LaValle said the key issue for the five East End Towns — the 1st District at the time also included all of Brookhaven Town except Patchogue and Blue Point — was to “maintain integrity over zoning so that the character of the area will be maintained.”

Mr. McCoy, who secured the Democratic nomination through a primary after “Doc” Menendez of Riverhead was the choice coming out of the convention, stated in the same guide that his key issue was to prevent the construction of a Cross Sound Bridge connecting Long Island to Connecticut.

Heralded largely for his experience in Albany, Mr. LaValle quickly emerged as the favorite in the race and never lost his edge in a year that saw Democrat Jimmy Carter elected president and Democrat Otis Pike re-elected to Congress in New York’s 1st District. Mr. LaValle enjoyed particular success in Southold and Southampton towns, where he received a 5,200-vote advantage over his opponent.

He quickly increased his profile on the East End by introducing the Farmland Preservation Act in his first term. The landmark legislation called for state and local governments to each pay half the cost of buying and preserving farmland. In return for accepting fair-market value for land, a farmer would agree to include a deed restricting the land from being sold for anything but farming.

By the time his first bid for re-election rolled around in 1978, Mr. LaValle had become so popular he received 5,000 more votes than he did in his first election bid, despite the fact that 1978 was a non-presidential year in which 1st District voter turnout dropped 20 percent.

It would be another 12 years before a LaValle opponent would receive more than 30 percent of the vote.

The senator has outgained his opponents by such large margins that many have wondered if Democrats have even tried most years to unseat him.

In a recent interview, even Ms. Henry, widely regarded as his most legitimate challenger, said she believed this.

“A lot of years the candidate has been nothing more than a name on a ballot,” Ms. Henry said.

It’s a point Mr. LaValle takes exception to.

In 1980, he defeated Robert Gottlieb by the fifth-largest margin over anyone he’s ever defeated, yet he says Mr. Gottlieb, a former Suffolk County assistant district attorney, put up a nasty fight.

“He was the most pugnacious opponent I ever faced,” Mr. LaValle said of Mr. Gottlieb. “If I said it’s raining outside, he’d say ‘How do you know that?’ ”

Even the man who received the fewest votes of all against Mr. LaValle, Ira Costell of Port Jefferson Station, said he put his best foot forward. Mr. Costell, then a 28-year-old who one year earlier had run an unsuccessful campaign for Brookhaven Town Board but fared well along the North Shore, received just 19,013 votes in 1986, a low turnout year. An anti-Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant candidate, he secured just 25.9 percent of the vote despite capturing the endorsement of the historically conservative Suffolk Life newspaper.

“It’s actually kind of depressing I got the least votes,” Mr. Costell said with a laugh. “But it was definitely a daunting task.”

The chosen one

“I didn’t just lose a campaign that year, I lost my reputation.” 

 Sherrye Henry, LaValle opponent, 1990

Sherrye Henry was a popular New York City television and radio personality in the 1970s and ’80s who claims in her 1994 book “The Deep Divide” to have at one time hosted the city’s most listened-to radio interview program.

The first woman in the country to broadcast television editorials, Ms. Henry was best known as a staunch feminist. A 1971 print advertisement for her CBS morning television show “Woman!,” vowed to promote the issues that matter most to women, not just give “cooking lessons” or “sewing tips.”

In 1990, Governor Mario Cuomo asked former vice presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro to recruit women to run in 14 districts across New York where Democrats believed a campaign on feminist issues could help the party gain a majority in a state Senate where Republicans held just a four-seat advantage. The strategy came on the heels of a U.S. Supreme Court decision that would have put abortion rights in the hands of state legislators.

Ms. Ferraro tapped Ms. Henry, who split her time between East Hampton and Manhattan, to run in the 1st District. A Yale graduate, and no stranger to politics, Ms. Henry had connections to the Kennedys and her former husband served as commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission during John F. Kennedy’s presidency.

RON GALELLA PHOTO / WIREIMAGE | Sherrye Henry was famed Watergate journalist Carl Bernstein’s date to the inaugural Guild Hall Awards at St. Regis Hotel in New York City in 1985.

Most importantly to Ms. Ferraro and Gov. Cuomo, Ms. Henry was a vocal pro-choice proponent whose media background could help her and 1st District Assembly candidate Linda Bird Francke secure prime television interviews.

“They even appeared on the Ted Koppel Show,” Mr. LaValle recalled.

Ms. Henry’s growing profile — Superman himself, Christopher Reeve, came out to support her — and her contrasting style from Mr. LaValle’s had his campaign worried.

Then there was the money being spent.

To this day, no LaValle opponent’s campaign committee has spent more than the half-million dollars spent by Ms. Henry. Only Regina Calcaterra of New Suffolk came close in 2010, spending nearly $400,000 before her bid was cut short due to residency restrictions. By comparison, Ms. Fleming’s run this year cost less than half of what Ms. Henry’s campaign spent 22 years earlier.

“They bought spots during the World Series,” Mr. LaValle said — an expensive buy in a year where the home team Yankees represented the American League.

One frequently aired radio and television advertisement, according to a 1990 New York Times story, criticized Mr. LaValle for voting “against our right to choose.”

“He’s just not listening to us,” the ad suggested to women voters.

It was a high-energy campaign complete with debates both Mr. LaValle and Ms. Henry described as spirited. Both candidates were forced to knock on thousands of doors across the East End. At one point polling numbers suggested the candidates were neck and neck, a Henry campaign staffer recalled.

Then things took a turn for the worse for the challenger.

In October, Ms. Henry’s campaign issued a mailer that ripped Mr. LaValle for poor attendance in the Senate, stating he had missed votes on 119 bills that year. They were working from information the state Democratic Committee had given them, but that information failed to reflect that nearly all of those votes occurred over a brief stretch during which Mr. LaValle was visiting his gravely ill father in a Long Island hospital and later attending to the details of his funeral.

That’s when the LaValle campaign took off the gloves.

The senator began to make frequent radio and television appearances decrying Ms. Henry’s “lack of accuracy and sensitivity,” according to the Nov. 8, 1990, issue of the Riverhead News-Review. Eventually, Ms. Henry offered a public apology.

Looking back, Ms. Henry said in an interview earlier this month that two tactics employed by the LaValle campaign still bother her to this day.

One was a print advertisement she said was created by artists at Suffolk Life that described her as “a woman of low moral character,” a statement she said was also made in Republican radio spots that year.

Ms. Henry’s other key beef with the LaValle campaign was a claim she said the senator made at the end of a televised debate that stated Ms. Henry had voted twice in the 1984 presidential election, at both her home district in East Hampton and her previous polling place in Manhattan. Ms. Henry said she voted only in East Hampton that year but, due to a Board of Elections oversight, her name still appeared on the voter log in the city.

“Like I was going to go from the Hamptons to the city for one extra vote in Mondale’s losing campaign,” Ms. Henry said. “At that point, the election had completely turned.”

NEWS-REVIEW FILE PHOTO | Senator Ken LaValle fields the concession call from Sherrye Henry on Election Day 1990.

By the time election night rolled around, Ms. Henry said she knew she had lost the campaign, she just didn’t realize by how much. The final tally was 52,306 votes for Mr. LaValle, to just 27,353 for Ms. Henry.

“I will remember that race in my grave,” Ms. Henry said.

As a victorious Mr. LaValle hung up the phone that night at campaign headquarters, he uttered one sentence to his teary-eyed family members and campaign staffers.

“Well, this victory was for pop,” he said.

How he does it

“He has a remarkable ability to listen.” 

John Jay LaValle, Suffolk County
Republican chairman

Senator LaValle often references a thick black binder he keeps with him on the Senate floor. Indexed in the bulging book is community input on key issues. If a constituent calls his office to voice support or opposition to a particular piece of legislation, a LaValle staffer will log the call, which makes its way into the book. Newspaper columns and editorials also get clipped and inserted.

But don’t expect to see Mr. LaValle sipping a cup of coffee and reading the latest issue of the Port Jefferson Times Record at his Port Jefferson home during campaign season.

“I don’t ever open the local papers during a campaign,” he said. “And I only listen to Connecticut radio stations.”

He says that tactic keeps his mind clear of claims made in political advertisements.

It’s all part of a larger philosophy the senator has developed that he says keeps him from looking back on the past. Because of this mind-set, he claims he doesn’t regret a single vote he’s ever cast.

“I talk to other senators who tell me they don’t sleep the night before a big vote,” he said. “I’ve had very few, if any, votes where I had to think about it at the last minute.”

He says that he votes based largely on constituent feedback given to him and his staff. If public input is split on an issue — he said he voted against gay marriage last year even though the communication he received was near 50/50 — he uses campaign promises he made and his own intuition to determine how to vote.

“I ran on civil unions [in 2010],” he said of his vote against the bill that ultimately legalized gay marriage. “I wasn’t going back on that.”

It’s the issues, Mr. LaValle said, that keep him interested in his job. He admits that when he first ran in 1976, he told reporters he would not remain in the position for more than 10 years.

He almost stayed true to that promise. In early 1986, Republican leaders made a strong push for him to run a primary against Congressman William Carney. It’s one of three times he’s been asked to seek higher office.

But by April 1986, he had withdrawn his name from consideration.

“I never really wanted to go to Washington,” Mr. LaValle said. “And looking at Washington today, I’m so glad I didn’t.”

Ultimately, he said his decisions to seek re-election to the Senate have been based largely on a desire to follow legislation he is working on to the finish line. This year, he said, the decade-old negotiation to unite Southampton Hospital with the Stony Brook University system was his single biggest reason to stay in office. As it turns out, a deal was struck late in his 2012 campaign. He said he is looking to expand on his goal to improve health care on the East End by also bringing both Peconic Bay Medical Center and Eastern Long Island Hospital into the Stony Brook system. He said this week that meetings have already been scheduled with officials at both hospitals.

RIBERT O’ROURK FILE PHOTO | Mr. LaValle during his latest concession call. Of 1,971 state senators in the U.S., Mr. LaValle has won the second most elections.

The face-to-face meeting is where LaValle supporters say the senator excels politically.

“He’s everywhere,” said county GOP chairman John Jay LaValle, a former Brookhaven Town Supervisor and a cousin of the senator. “A lot of politicians win an election or two and they get lazy. Ken has never let up. He has a presence at every major event and he has a passion for learning and a passion for listening.”

Even his critics and former opponents acknowledge that it’s hard to miss Mr. LaValle and his trademark red baseball cap at events throughout the district, even if they disagree with his politics.

“Listen, he’s affable and gentlemanly and an overall nice guy,” said Mr. Costell, his 1986 opponent. “But I think a lot of his success has come from the clout he’s built through decades worth of political favors. He’s definitely a go-along-to-get-along kind of guy.

“As a person, he’s a fine individual, but for the great length that he’s been in office I’m hard pressed to come up with that trademark legislation of his that’s had a dramatic impact,” Mr. Costell said.

Of course, Mr. LaValle disagrees. He frequently points to his sponsorship of the Pine Barrens Protection Act of 1993 as his signature bill. As a longtime chairman of the Senate higher education committee, he also lists the expansion of Stony Brook University, where the $22 million football stadium bears his name, among his career highlights.

“My desire is to see Stony Brook move up the ranks of national universities,” he said.

And to that end, he says he has no plan to quit, even as he enters his first year as the senior member of the Senate — a distinction he will share with 80-year-old Sen. Hugh Farley of Schenectady, who was also first elected in 1976.

He said he doesn’t plan to slow down, either.

“It all goes back to something my father would always say when I was playing sports in my youth,” Mr. LaValle said. “He’d say ‘I don’t care if you win or lose, just don’t get out-hustled.’ ”

gparpan@timesreview.com

11/27/12 1:06pm
11/27/2012 1:06 PM

TIMES/REVIEW FILE PHOTOS | Southold Town Councilman Al Krupski , left,and Riverhead Town Supervisor Sean Walter will face each other January 15 in a special election for Suffolk County Legislature.

Riverhead Supervisor Sean Walter will face Southold Councilman Al Krupski for the 1st District seat in the Suffolk County Legislature in a special election that will likely be held Jan. 15, officials said Tuesday.

Ed Romaine (R-Center Moriches) vacated the legislator post Monday, as he was sworn in as Brookhaven Town supervisor.

Mr. Walter said he was encouraged in recent weeks by state and county elected officials to run for Legislature, and that he feels it’s his time to move on to county government.

“They asked me and I’m very happy to do it,” said Mr. Walter, who’s in his second two-year term.

He pointed to steering new businesses to Main Street, improving the town’s financial picture and moving toward the creation of a subdivision at EPCAL as major highlights of his tenure as Riverhead supervisor.

He said his work on these major areas of concern to Riverhead residents are a reflection of what he can do in the Legislature.

“The economy and taxes are the biggest issues facing the First Legislative District,” Mr. Walter said. “We have to bring economic growth with balance. The subdivision of EPCAL fits right into that balance because it is the place in the district where we should have economic growth.

“I’ll be able to continue on with my plan there [as Legislator].”

Mr. Walter also said his work to preserve farmland on the North Fork and to protect the agri-tourism market fits into the role he would play as a legislator.

When asked why someone from Southold Town would vote for him over a locally elected leader there — one who would serve in the Democratic majority, Mr. Walter said he “would be a loud, outspoken voice for the entire North Fork.”

“I don’t shy away from a battle,” he said.

Mr. Krupski said he’s looking forward to the challenge of facing Mr. Walter in a rare Suffolk legislator matchup pitting a current elected official from Southold Town against a current elected official in Riverhead.

“I’m sure he’s a worthy opponent,” Mr. Krupski said of Mr. Walter. “He’ll run on his record and I’ll run on mine.”

Mr. Krupski said the issues he’d face at the county level are similar to those he’s already dealing with in Southold Town.

“In many ways this is the same as the Town Board,” he said. “I understand land preservation, transportation and quality of life issues, plus controlling the size and cost of government. Those are East End issues that should translate well to the rest of the the county.”

Mr. Krupksi was the only name mentioned by Suffolk Democratic Chairman Rich Schaffer on Election Night, and he quickly emerged as the clear-cut choice. Suffolk Republicans, meanwhile, waited until the day after Mr. Romaine’s inauguration Monday to name Mr. Walter as their guy, even though Suffolk County Republican Chairman John Jay LaValle said at the inauguration that a decision had already been made.

Mr. Walter emerged as the nominee from a group of four finalists that included fellow Riverhead Town Board members Jodi Giglio and John Dunleavy, and Romaine aide Bill Faulk.

Ms. Giglio said that while she and Mr. Walter haven’t always seen eye-to-eye, they’re “both fiscal conservatives and I wish him well.”

“I love Ed; I think he’s great,” she continued. “He’s going to be a fantastic supervisor. And I know Sean would make a great county legislator.”

Mr. LaValle said that even though Mr. Walter has battled with Ms. Giglio and other Republican Town Board members, and Mr. Krupski has long had the respect of Republicans in Southold Town, he believes both town Republican committees will do their part to assure Mr. Walter wins in January. He said the debate among Republicans has only helped improve Riverhead and he credited Mr. Walter with much of the success.

“He’s resurrected a Town of Riverhead that was stagnant for a number of years,” Mr. LaValle said of Mr. Walter.

County legislators are expected next week to set the date of the special election for Jan. 15, though by law they have 90 days from Monday, when Mr. Romaine stepped down as county legislator.

Both Mr. Walter and Mr. LaValle both said Tuesday that they’d prefer to hold the election in February to give 1st Legislative District residents more time to learn about the candidates. They also said a February election could be held in conjunction with a special election for Brookhaven Town highway superintendent —  a move they said could save Suffolk County taxpayers $100,000.

Tim Kelly contributed reporting to this story.

gparpan@timesreview.com

11/26/12 6:49pm
11/26/2012 6:49 PM

TIM GANNON FILE PHOTO | Suffolk Republican leaders have chosen their nominee for the 1st District seat in the County Legislature, and the last man to hold the post indicated Monday that Riverhead Town Supervisor Sean Walter could be the choice.

Suffolk Republican leaders have chosen their nominee for the 1st District seat in the County Legislature, and the last man to hold the post indicated Monday that Riverhead Supervisor Sean Walter could be the choice.

Speaking after his inauguration as Brookhaven Town Supervisor, Ed Romaine said Monday that he’s hearing party officials are giving “serious consideration” to Mr. Walter, who emerged last week as a finalist for the job. Riverhead council members John Dunleavy and Jodi Giglio, and Romaine aide Bill Faulk, are the other three finalists.

Suffolk County Republican Chairman John Jay LaValle confirmed Monday that a nominee has been selected by the Republican Committee and that a press release will be issued Tuesday morning, but he declined to name which of the four finalists would get the nod.

“We’ve made our decision,” Mr. LaValle said Monday afternoon. “I just can’t say who it is yet.”

Mr. Walter, Ms. Giglio and Mr. Faulk all said Monday that they had not yet heard from party officials.

Democrats have already chosen Southold Councilman Al Krupski as their nominee.

Mr. Romaine said whoever the nominee is, they’ll have a challenge going up against Mr. Krupski in just a six-week election cycle.

“I know [Mr. Krupski] and he’ll put up a good fight,” Mr. Romaine said.

Mr. Romaine confirmed that the election will likely be held Jan. 15, a date he said will be voted on at the County Legislature’s meeting next Tuesday. By law, the election must be held within 90 days of the previous Legislator leaving office.

With the Democrats having already announced their candidate, he said the Democratic majority in the Legislature would prefer to schedule the election for as early as possible.

“They’re not going to schedule it for Feb. 9,” Mr. Romaine said.

Of the four finalists for Legislature, only Ms. Giglio was absent from Mr. Romaine’s inauguration at a packed Brookhaven Town Hall Monday afternoon. Mr. Walter, who has been locked in a public battle with Ms. Giglio that has escalated in recent weeks, attended the inauguration with his political adviser, Anthony Coates, who has already announced his intention to unseat Ms. Giglio next November.

gparpan@timesreview.com

11/08/12 8:00am
11/08/2012 8:00 AM

TIM KELLY FILE PHOTO | Al Krupski and Congressman Tim Bishop at a March event in Southold.

Scott Russell vs. Al Krupski?

County Legislator Ed Densieski?

Faulk for Legislature?

These are some of the names being bounced around by party leaders to replace County Legislator Ed Romaine, who won a special election Tuesday for Brookhaven Town Supervisor.

Mr. Krupski was the only potential candidate named Tuesday night by Suffolk Democratic chairman Richard Schaffer. He said Wednesday that he’s interested, but he can’t commit to running in a special election just yet.

“I can’t say yes but I’m not saying no,” said Mr. Krupski, the only Democrat to hold a Town Board post in Mr. Romaine’s district.  “I’m going to talk about it with Rich and then talk about it with my family. I certainly know the district and the county, so it’s not like I’m coming out of the cabbage patch.”

In that comment Mr. Krupski pokes fun at his life as a pumpkin farmer, and raises the question on whether he can run his family’s Peconic agricultural business while simultaneously representing a legislative district that stretches from Fishers Island to Center Moriches.

“That’s going to take a little bit of reflection,” he said.

Art Tillman, Southold Democratic leader, responded with enthusiasm on the prospect of councilman’s candidacy.

“I think it would be great to have a farmer serving in the County Legislature,” Mr. Tillman said.

Mr. Krupski, Southold’s only elected Democrat, has long been considered the heir-apparent to Republican Supervisor Scott Russell.

During the Southold Polish Democratic Club’s “roast” of Mr. Krupski earlier this year, Mr. Schaffer went as far as to describe the councilman as “Southold’s next supervisor.”

And he still could be. Especially if Mr. Russell ran for the open legislature seat. Sound like a stretch? Well, Suffolk County Republican chairman John Jay LaValle said Wednesday that Mr. Russell’s name has been discussed for the post, though he said he has not yet had a conversation with the supervisor about it.

Mr. Russell said that’s unlikely, especially with Mr. Krupski on the ballott.

“There’s no scenario whatsoever where I would be running against Albert for any elected office,” he said.

If Krupski wasn’t in the mix?.

“I’m pretty invested in Southold Town,” said Mr. Russell, who confirmed he hasn’t talked to Mr. LaValle. “There’s a lot of demands to being supervisor, but at the end of the day I’m still in Southold. I still get to go to my kid’s football game. The strains of covering four towns would hamper my ability to be a good dad. Politics is all about timing and the timing isn’t right.”

Mr. Russell noted that for a brief time in 1995 he actually was the expected GOP nominee for Legislature, but was replaced at the nominating convention by former Legislator Mike Caracciolo.

Mr. LaValle said he has been approached about the vacant seat by Bill Faulk, an aide to Mr. Romaine, and former Riverhead Town Councilman Ed Densieski.

Riverhead Town Councilmembers John Dunleavy and Jodi Giglio have both expressed interest, among other Republicans about the job.

Riverhead GOP chairman John Galla said Republicans will have many options.

“I think you’re going to see a deep bench of candidates,” he said. “I’m sure you’ll hear from people who might come forward now that the people of Brookhaven made their decision.”

Anthony Coates, an aide to Riverhead Town Supervisor Sean Walter, said he plans to pursue a political office in 2013. He is expected to make an announcement next week.

Mr. Romaine said his replacement in the Legislature will have to fight hard to get the residents of the North Fork what they need. He said that person will need to stand up to others “for what is right” for the East End.

“If the issues are right and you can make a decent case, you can prevail,” said Mr. Romaine when asked what advice he’d give his replacement.

And what might those key issues be?

“Preserving farmland and open space,” he said. “Working on the Peconic Estuary to minimize nitrogen pollution and preventing red and brown tide. Working to preserve our coastline from erosion. And ensuring that taxes stay low. I can go on and on.”

Mr. Romaine secured about 57 percent of the vote in Tuesday’s special election to replace former supervisor Mark Lesko. He outperformed Democratic nominee Brian Beedenbender of Centereach by more than 20,000 votes.

Reporting by Jennifer Gustavson, Tim Kelly, Paul Squire and Michael White.