01/23/14 1:11pm
01/23/2014 1:11 PM
JENNIFER GUSTAVSON PHOTO | Senator Ken LaValle at a previous Calverton Business Incubator event.

JENNIFER GUSTAVSON FILE PHOTO | State Senator Ken LaValle wants New York to delay Common Core rollout.

State Senator Ken LaValle is calling on education department commissioner John King to “hit the delay button” with rolling out new, more rigorous curriculum in public schools through the Common Core. (more…)

12/02/13 4:50pm
12/02/2013 4:50 PM
Downtown Riverhead, East Main Street, Riverhead IDA

TIM GANNON FILE PHOTO | The former Woolworth building on East Main Street has been largely empty since the old five-and-dime chain closed in 1997.

The revitalization of the former Woolworth building in downtown Riverhead will be receiving several grants to assist in the conversion of the building into a gym, stores and affordable apartments, officials said Monday.

Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone, state Sen. Ken LaValle, North Fork county legislator Al Krupski and Riverhead Town officials are scheduled to announce the grant at a 12:30 p.m. press conference Tuesday at the site.

“The county will provide infrastructure funding to redevelop the building,” a statement from Mr. Bellone stated Monday. The redevelopment of the building, which has been vacant since 1997, “is expected to create about 125 construction jobs and 100 retail employment opportunities.”

A group called Woolworth Revitalization LLC, headed by Michael Butler of Sag Harbor, purchased the building earlier this year and received town approvals to build a gym on the ground floor, with smaller storefronts on Main Street and 19-apartments on the upper floor of the building.

It was unclear what grants were to be announced on Tuesday.

In September, the county announced that $800,000 would be allocated toward the project, including $250,000 from the county to offset certain land and infrastructure costs. In addition, the county also said in September that 11 of the affordable units would be funded with Federal HOME Investment Partnership program funds in the amount of $550,000, and that project will receive $75,000 from the Town through the NY Main Street Program for revitalization.

Ultimate on Main, a gym that used to be located on Route 58, and Goldberg’s Famous Bagels, are already on board as tenants in the project, and the Long Island Housing Partnership is working with the developer on the affordable rentals.

11/27/13 8:22am
11/27/2013 8:22 AM
CARRIE MILLER PHOTO

CARRIE MILLER PHOTO

About two dozen educators as well as students took to a podium at Tuesday night’s Common Core forum in Manorville to, for the most part, poke holes in the state’s rollout of the Common Core State Standards Initiative.

Click on the video below to see what they, and state education commissioner John King, had to say.

11/27/13 6:00am
CARRIE MILLER PHOTO | Education commissioner John King and state Board of Regents Meryl Tisch listening to a parade of speakers at Tuesday night's forum.

CARRIE MILLER PHOTO | Education commissioner John King and state Board of Regents Meryl Tisch listening to a parade of speakers at Tuesday night’s forum.

Long Islanders outraged over New York’s direction with education in public schools took their concerns directly to state education commissioner John King Tuesday night during a public forum in Manorville.

When Mr. King first walked onto the stage in the Eastport-South Manor High School auditorium, he was greeted with a large portion of the 1,000-person crowd, mostly teachers, quietly holding up green and white signs that read, “We are all more than a score.”

Several area high school students also asked questions and made statements.

Connor Sick of Rocky Point High School wanted to know “why failure is being used as a weapon” to try to get children to perform better in school.

“As a student who takes his studies very seriously, failure  is not motivational,” he said. “It hurts.”

He received a standing ovation.

Throughout the three-hour meeting, attendees often became disruptive , jeering as the commissioner attempted to respond to audience questions. Then, as he began to give his final remarks at the conclusion of the meeting, almost half the crowd walked out, with one heckler shouting: “You’re not listening! Goodbye!”

Mr. King continued to defend New York’s implementation of the Common Core State Standards Initiative, which requires, among other things, instructors to teach more non-fiction and rigorous math to students at a younger age.

He also championed the state’s lessons plans designed to support the new curriculum, known as “modules,” as well as new, state-mandated teacher evaluations and a contract with inBloom, Inc. that will store student data and personal information.

But Mr. King acknowledged some adjustments are needed, such as reducing student testing requirements, especially with English as a Second Language students and students with disabilities.

“Disagreeing isn’t the same as not listening,” he said as residents started to leave during his closing remarks.

Frustrated parents criticized Mr. King, who was joined on stage with Chancellor of the New York State Board of Regents Meryl Tisch and Regent Roger Tilles, throughout the meeting and asked that the state scrap the new education mandates.

Many parents told stories about how test anxiety has hurt their children. Others expressed how they are annoyed by how the state Department of Education rolled out the new requirements for public schools.

Recently retired teacher and Wading River resident Terry Kalb said she’s “alarmed” about the current teacher evaluation system, especially for special needs teachers.

“Even if they have perfect scores on their observations in the classroom, because they teach students that are physically, cogitative or emotionally impaired, the test scores are going to be low,” she said. “Those teachers are rated ineffective — by mandate.”

But two people who took to the podium spoke in favor of Common Core, to the displeasure of the crowd.

The Common Core standards were created by nonprofit organizations, including the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers, as a way to better prepare students from across the U.S. for college and careers after high school.

Along with the federal government, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has funded the Common Core initiative. Pearson, a worldwide publishing and educational company, is the primary producer and seller of Common Core instructional materials.

In 2009, through the “Race to the Top” program, the federal government offered $4.35 billion in competitive grants to states that adopted Common Core standards and developed plans to improve state test scores and teacher evaluation results.

The following year, New York adopted the Common Core in order to qualify for a $700 million portion of the federal grant, and later published lesson plans for teachers to help students meet the new standards.

Earlier this year, and as part of Race to the Top requirements, the state did direct New York school districts develop their own teacher evaluation systems, known as annual professional performance reviews plan (APPR), lest the districts risk losing additional available state aid.

The state Department of Education has been heavily criticized by school officials across New York for pushing the new mandates before districts were ready for them. While many educators embraced Common Core when it was first introduced, they’ve since demanded that the state hold off on implementing the new student assessments based on Common Core and the APPR plan until the rigorous curriculum is properly implemented inside the classroom.

State Senator Ken LaValle (R-Port Jefferson), who hosted the meeting, told Mr. King he believes a moratorium on the state’s plan is needed.

“We need a delay so we can get everyone in synch,” said Mr. LaValle, himself a former educator and school administrator.

Other local residents with ties to the North Fork that addressed Mr. King included Riverhead School District parent Catherine Callaghan, Shoreham-Wading River school board president Bill McGrath, Aquebogue Elementary School fourth-grade teacher Shelly Walker, Mattituck-Cutchogue High School math teacher Kathleen Scholand, Riverhead Middle School English teacher Mindy Benze, Riverhead High School librarian Kim McGurk, Shoreham-Wading River Teachers’ Association president and special education teacher Lucille McKee and Southold School District Superintendent David Gamberg.

jennifer@timesreview.com

11/26/13 10:30am
11/26/2013 10:30 AM
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS PHOTO | New York State Education Department commissioner John King.

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS PHOTO | New York State Education Department commissioner John King.

A public forum with New York Department of Education commissioner John King is set for 6 p.m. tonight at Eastport-South Manor High School in Manorville.

While the forum will be open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis, state officials said speakers will be chosen prior to the meeting.

State Senator Ken LaValle(R-Port Jefferson)  has asked local superintendents to meet with their school’s community members — including parents, students, teachers, and PTAs — to organize their comments and questions relating to Common Core, teacher evaluations, standardized testing and student privacy, and submit them to his office by last Thursday.

Riverhead School District officials have said only one question from each school district will be allowed based on submittals, and a seat at the event will be reserved for each of the speakers chosen.

Tonight’s forum comes about a month after Mr. King was criticized for canceling some previously scheduled meetings, which he said at the time were being “co-opted by special interests whose stated goal was to ‘dominate’ the questions and manipulate the forum.”

The Common Core State Standards Initiative is a new set of standards that requires instructors to teach more non-fiction and rigorous math to students at a younger age. The Common Core standards were created by nonprofit organizations, including the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers, as a way to better prepare students from across the U.S. for college and careers after high school.

While the state has claimed the Common Core program aims to better prepare students for college and careers, many educators have criticized the initiative because they believe it forces teachers to abandon true learning and “teach to the test.”

Check back later for live coverage.

jennifer@timesreview.com

 

11/21/13 1:41pm
11/21/2013 1:41 PM
JENNIFER GUSTAVSON PHOTO | Senator Ken LaValle at a previous Calverton Business Incubator event.

JENNIFER GUSTAVSON PHOTO | Senator Ken LaValle at a previous Calverton Business Incubator event.

East End state legislators Ken LaValle and Fred Thiele are hosting a roundtable discussion on food-industry related topics at the Calverton Business Incubator Friday morning, Senator LaValle (R-Port Jefferson) announced.

The Senator said the following topics will be discussed:

• The impact of locally grown/artisanal foods on the local economy.

• Changes to New York State funding outlets — now done on a competitive, regional basis.

• State government has been successful in supporting the establishment of the necessary infrastructure to support the local agriculture/food industry (e.g. funding for cold storage facility, funding for establishment of small scale, shared-use food-processing facilities at Calverton, funding for farmland preservation) to allow the creativity, determination, and ambition of entrepreneurs to thrive. Determine other infrastructure needs and how to achieve those needs.

• How as a region can we work together to establish/support the food industry on Long Island as an economic cluster (to join IT, biotech, and energy) and overcome challenges/obstacles and allow it to flourish.

The Long island Farm Bureau, Long Island Wine Council, Peconic Land Trust and many other local businesses and non-profits are expected to participate.

The event will take place at 10 a.m. Click here for directions to the incubator.

11/18/13 12:00pm
11/18/2013 12:00 PM
BARBARAELLEN KOCH FILE PHOTO | Senator Ken LaValle will host the Common Core forum.

BARBARAELLEN KOCH FILE PHOTO | Senator Ken LaValle will host the Common Core forum.

Residents planning to comment or ask questions during the Nov. 26 public forum with New York Department of Education commissioner John King will need to contact their school district and make prior arrangements, according to staffers in state Senator Ken LaValle’s office.

While the forum will be open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis, state officials said speakers will be chosen prior to the meeting.

Mr. LaValle (R-Port Jefferson) has asked local superintendents to meet with their school’s community members — including parents, students, teachers, and PTAs — to organize their comments and questions relating to Common Core State Standards and curriculum, teacher evaluations, standardized testing and student privacy, and submit them to his office by Thursday, Nov. 21.

“In light of our time constraints, questions will be reviewed ahead of time to eliminate duplication,” Mr. LaValle said in his letter. “Remember to keep any questions/comments to two minutes. Speakers will be chosen and notified ahead of time.”

Riverhead School District officials said Monday only one question from each school district will be allowed based on submittals, and a seat at the event will be reserved for each of the speakers chosen.

Mr. LaValle said the arrangement is needed because his legislative jurisdiction includes more than 30 school districts. The First Senatorial District contains the most amount of school districts on Long Island, he said.

In addition to the meeting being be held in the 1,000-seat auditorium located at Eastport-South Manor High School in Manorville, officials said there will be an “overflow room” where people can watch the forum via closed-circuit television. The event will also be live streamed on the senator’s website, www.senatorlavalle.com.

jennifer@timesreview.com 

11/12/13 4:00pm
11/12/2013 4:00 PM
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS PHOTO | New York State Education Department commissioner John King.

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS PHOTO | New York State Education Department commissioner John King.

Residents will no longer have to sign up with their local school districts to secure a seat for the Nov. 26 public meeting with New York Department of Education commissioner John King, state Senator Ken LaValle’s office said Tuesday.

A sign-up list won’t be necessary because a larger venue has been secured at the Eastport-South Manor High School auditorium in Manorville, Mr. LaValle’s spokesman Drew Biondo said. Entry will be determined on a first-come, first-serve basis, Mr. Biondo said.

Mr. LaValle (R-Port Jefferson) has said he was working to relocate the meeting from Riverhead High School’s 800-seat auditorium to a new location in order to accommodate a larger crowd. Last week, the state Department of Education posted on its website that the meeting will take place in Manorville. Eastport’s auditorium can accommodate 1,000 people, a school spokesperson said.

Mr. Biondo said the senator is also looking to live stream the event. Additional details will be released closer to the meeting date, he said.

On Tuesday, Mr. King is expected to address state Senator John Flanagan’s (R-East Northport) constituents at Ward Melville High School in East Setauket from 6 to 8 p.m.

Mr. Flanagan’s office said the meeting is open to the public. Although seating capacity is 900 in that auditorium, the school will be able to accommodate an additional 400 seats in the cafeteria where the event will be live streamed.

The forums are designed to answer questions and provide information to the public on the Common Core Stand Standards Initiative, teacher evaluations and state assessments.

jennifer@timesreview.com