02/19/14 8:00am
02/19/2014 8:00 AM
Riverhead Town is considering bringing a Manorville man to court who is alleged to be illegally operating a puppy breeding operation out of his home. Pictured, a man delivers a dog to breeder John Kowal's home on River Road. (Courtesy photo)

Riverhead Town is considering bringing a Manorville man to court who is alleged to be illegally operating a puppy breeding operation out of his home. Pictured, a man delivers a dog to breeder John Kowal’s home on River Road. (Courtesy photo)

Riverhead Town officials are considering legal action against a Manorville man they say has been illegally breeding and selling dogs from his home.

(more…)

11/10/13 12:44pm
11/10/2013 12:44 PM
SURVEILLANCE PHOTO | Suffolk police said Paul Tromblee of Manorville has been identified as the man in this surveillance photo. He is charged with nine counts of armed robbery.

SURVEILLANCE PHOTO | Suffolk police said Paul Tromblee of Manorville has been identified as the man in this surveillance photo. He is charged with nine counts of armed robbery.

A Manorville man was arrested Saturday in connection with the armed robbery of the Hess gas station on Edwards Avenue in Calverton and at least eight other incidents, Suffolk County police said.

PAUL TROMBLEE

PAUL TROMBLEE

Paul Tromblee, 35, may still face charges in relation to other armed robberies in the county, police said. Southold Town Police said last week that the suspect in the other area robberies may have been responsible for the armed robbery of the GameStop store in Mattituck last Tuesday, though Mr. Tromblee has not yet been charged in connection with that incident.

Det. Lt. Edward Reilly of the Suffolk County Police Department said Sunday that detectives are working with Southold police, who he said still believe Mr. Tromblee is responsible for the Mattituck robbery.

Currently, Mr. Tromblee stands charged with eight counts of first-degree robbery and one count of third-degree robbery. He is scheduled to be arraigned at First District Court in Central Islip Sunday, Suffolk police said.

Since Oct. 26, gas stations in Calverton, Mastic, North Babylon, St. James, Dix Hills, and Bohemia as well as Jamba Juice in Stony Brook, Kissed by the Sun Tanning in Islip, and CVS Pharmacy in Lake Ronkonkoma were robbed by an armed suspect who demanded cash after pretending to purchase merchandise, police said. Utilizing video surveillance as well as tips, including information received via Crime Stoppers, Pattern Crime Unit detectives identified the suspect as Mr. Tromblee. He was located by detectives while driving on Sunrise Highway in Brookhaven around 3 p.m. Saturday.

The Hess gas station — barely in the jurisdiction of the SCPD – was robbed Oct. 30, after a man pulled a handgun on a store clerk, demanding cash from the register about 7:45 p.m.

Mohammed Kahn, the clerk at the Calverton Hess, told the News-Review on the night of the incident that the robber walked straight up to the register and demanded cash, first giving him the impression that the act was a trick.

“I was looking to him like he was joking,” Mr. Kahn said at the time.

Detectives are continuing to investigate if Mr. Tromblee is responsible for similar incidents that occurred recently. Anyone with information about these incidents is asked to call anonymously to Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS. Police said all calls will remain confidential.

gparpan@timesreview.com

09/12/13 7:00pm
09/12/2013 7:00 PM
BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | PBMC Health board of directors president Sherry Patterson (center) and donors Jeffrey Feil (representing the Louis and Gertrude Feil Charitable Trust) and John Kanas cutting the ribbon Thursday afternoon.

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | PBMC Health board of directors president Sherry Patterson (center) and donors Jeffrey Feil (representing the Louis and Gertrude Feil Charitable Trust) and John Kanas cutting the ribbon Thursday afternoon in Manorville.

PBMC Health’s Manorville ambulatory campus is officially open to patients.

The opening was marked by a ribbon cutting ceremony led by hospital officials on Thursday.

Manorville area residents have long lacked access to nearby medical care, having had to travel to Riverhead or Stony Brook in the case of an emergency, PBMC Health officials said.

The much-anticipated center currently offers patients urgent care, primary care, urology, internal medicine and orthopedic care in one building, but the campus will ultimately grow and become a four-building comprehensive healthcare center.

“We want the community to know we are here and ready to care for them,” said Jacqueline Selva, executive director of the Riverhead Management Company.

The urgent care center is designed to handle health issues such as sprains, stitches, sore throats and broken bones, said Ms. Selva said.

It is fitted with 13 exam rooms, a radiology room with a full body x-ray machine, and two procedure rooms.

It is currently open from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., and once it becomes more established, officials intend to keep the urgent care center open 24 hours, she said.

The campus has been designed for “one-stop medical shop,” Ms. Selva said.

Patients can come not only for urgent care, but can have primary care physicians assume their care moving on. Should patients need a referral to a specialist, the hope is that, once the campus is finished, the patient will just have to walk a few steps away for the specialized care.

“We wanted it to be convenient,” she said. “Where patients are going to want to establish their care.”

Caregivers have already seen the model’s convenience in action, Ms. Selva said, pointing to a recent example in which an urgent care patient who came in complaining of a swelling hand.

“The person had came in with a swollen hand, we sent them down the hall for an x-ray and it turned out to be a broken hand,” Ms. Selva said. “After that the patient was referred to our orthopedist who was also down the hall.”

Many primary care and urgent care facilities are not equipped with radiology and X-ray equipment, she said.

The next building is slated to open about eight months from now, and will house a center for digestive disorders and space for general surgery.

Plans for the other buildings are currently being developed, hospital officials said.

“ [The campus] provides us with an opportunity to offer services well beyond just hospital care,” said Andrew Mitchell, president and CEO of PBMC Health and Peconic Bay Medical Center in Riverhead, which falls under the PBMC Health umbrella.

 

“These four buildings will be dedicated to the care of this community,” Mr. Mitchell said.

The completion of the campus was made possible by a $5 million donation from The Louis Feil Charitable Lead Annuity Trust. The center has been named The Gertrude & Louis Feil Campus for Ambulatory Care, in appreciation of the Feil family’s donation.

The Trust has given philanthropic gifts to other health institutions, including South Nassau Hospital in Oceanside.

The new medical center also brings new job opportunities to the area. The center has hired five new employees to fill reception and medical assistant positions. As the patient population grows, they anticipate several other positions opening as well, Ms. Selva said.

Helene Davison, a new employee working both reception and as a medical assistant, said she has 10 years of experience in private practice, and has never worked at such a “high spirited” place.

cmiller@timesreview.com

06/17/13 1:27pm
06/17/2013 1:27 PM
TIM GANNON PHOTO | DEC officers hunting for the alligator Friday.

TIM GANNON PHOTO | DEC officers hunting for the alligator Friday.

The alligator that’s been living in the Peconic River and eluded capture for more than a week was located and euthanized Sunday in Calverton.

The gator was killed about 25 yards down river from the state Department of Environmental Conservation kayak and canoe launch site off Connecticut Avenue.

The gator was killed by a single shot fired by a DEC conservation officer, a DEC spokesman said.

“Dart guns do not work on cold-blooded creatures,” said the spokesman, Bill Fonda.

Officers had been spotting and trying to capture the 3-foot long alligator alive for about a week near the boat ramp, Mr. Fonda said.

“As an option of last resort, the alligator was euthanized on Sunday in the interest of public safety,” he said. “Tranquilizing the alligator was not an option as the animal could still have evaded capture and returned to the water, continuing to pose a public safety threat. DEC has re-opened the canoe site.”

The boat ramp had been closed to the public during the search.

A DEC officer at the scene Friday said they hoped to catch the gator alive, if possible, but that proved too dangerous, Mr. Fonda said.

“DEC officers and staff used baited hooks, nets and catch poles in an attempt to capture the animal,” Mr. Fonda said.. “All these attempts proved futile.

Officials have said the gator was probably a pet that someone turned loose, and they have stressed owning an alligator is illegal in New York State.

The DEC in April found four other small alligators in the same area of the Peconic River boat ramp, and capture them alive.

tgannon@timesreview.com

DEC COURTESY PHOTO | These four gators were captured in the Peconic River Friday morning. A Manorville residents spotted the reptiles and contacted the DEC.

DEC COURTESY PHOTO | These four gators were captured in the Peconic River in April.

05/10/13 12:00pm
05/10/2013 12:00 PM
PBMC Health grant writer Max Comando of Jamesport, 24,  tests out the weighted Hula Hoops that will be used Saturday for the kids contest at the Garden Festival from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Staples Shopping Center on Route 58 in Riverhead.

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO  |  PBMC Health grant writer Max Comando of Jamesport, 24, tests out the weighted hula hoops that will be used Saturday for the kids contest at the Garden Festival form 1 to 3 p.m. at the Staples Shopping Center on Route 58 in Riverhead.

Flower lovers take note — the 18th Annual Garden Festival hosted by Peconic Bay Medical Center kicked off Thursday and will continue all weekend in Riverhead.

Forty East End growers will be selling everything from trees and bushes to flowers and bedding plants, which will be available at three different locations. Plant experts from the Cornell Cooperative Extension and Garden Center will be on hand to provide festival goers with green-thumb advice. Briermere Farm pies and Holey Moses cheesecakes will also be on sale.

Proceeds from the festival will benefit Project Fit America, a non-profit organization promoting cardiovascular health and fitness programs at elementary schools nation wide.

PBMC Health has partnered with Project Fit America to launch the program at Riverhead School District elementary schools, the first Project Fit America program in New York. Its health and fitness program has been used at schools in 42 other states.

All five elementary schools in the Riverhead district will benefit from the program.

To start promoting health and fitness, a weighted hula hoop contest for kids will take place every 15 minutes from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Staples Shopping Center on Route 58 in Riverhead Saturday. Winners from each round will take home a free potted plant for Mother’s Day.

The Garden Festival will take place May 9-12 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Staples Shopping Center in Riverhead and Green Lawn in Westhampton Beach.

It will also take place May 10-11 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at PBMC Health Manorville Campus located at 496 Route 111S in Manorville.

For more information call (631) 548-6080 or visit pbmchealth.org.

cmiller@timesreview.com

04/19/13 4:01pm
04/19/2013 4:01 PM
DEC COURTESY PHOTO | These four gators were captured in the Peconic River Friday morning. A Manorville residents spotted the reptiles and contacted the DEC.

DEC COURTESY PHOTO | These four gators were captured in the Peconic River Friday morning. A Manorville residents spotted the reptiles and contacted the DEC.

Four alligators were captured from the Peconic River in Calverton by state conservation officers Friday morning, officials said.

State Department of Environmental Conservation officials said in a press release the reptiles — ranging 2- to 4-feet-long — were spotted by Frank Naase about 8 a.m. near a dock at the Connecticut Avenue canoe launch.

The Manorville resident, who officials said frequents the dock after his morning cup of coffee, immediately contacted the DEC after noticing one of the alligators floating by.

The alligators were lethargic due to the cold water they had been exposed to, and were transferred to DEC’s regional headquarters in Stony Brook and will ultimately be sent to the Long Island Aquarium in Riverhead, officials said.

Lt. Dallas Bengel, left, and ECO Mark Simmons caught these gators Friday morning.

Lt. Dallas Bengel, left, and ECO Mark Simmons caught these gators Friday morning.

After catching a nearly 2-foot-long alligator with a catch pole, Lt. Dallas Bengel and Environmental Conservation Officer Mark Simmons observed three more alligators in the water and secured each of the animals with tape around their jaws, officials said.

Alligators are illegal to own as pets in New York. People planning to use them for exhibition, research or educational purposes are require to obtain a DEC permit, officials said.

Friday’s incident occurred a week prior to Long Island’s first illegal reptile and amphibian amnesty day.

The DEC has partnered with the Suffolk County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to allow for a “one-time only amnesty program,” where people can anonymously bring their illegal or unpermitted reptiles and amphibians without fear of prosecution.

Species that do not require permits, or are not threatened or endangered will not be accepted.

DEC Regional Director Peter Scully said in a press release he hopes residents will take advantage of the program.

“Alligators released into Long Island waters have become an all too common occurrence in recent years,” Mr. Scully said. “Unfortunately, individuals who attain these animals often find themselves incapable of caring for them as they grow, and they ultimately release them into the waters of Long Island where they are unable to survive and may pose a risk to recreationalists.”

The program will take place at Sweetbriar Nature Center, 62 Eckernkamp Drive in Smithtown, on April 27 from noon to 4 p.m.

To report any environmental crime, contact DEC’s hotline at 1-800-TIPP DEC (1-800-847-7332) or Dispatch number at (631) 444-0250.

Officials said calls will be kept confidential.

jennifer@timesreview.com