04/19/13 4:01pm
04/19/2013 4:01 PM
DEC COURTESY PHOTO | These four gators were captured in the Peconic River Friday morning. A Manorville residents spotted the reptiles and contacted the DEC.

DEC COURTESY PHOTO | These four gators were captured in the Peconic River Friday morning. A Manorville residents spotted the reptiles and contacted the DEC.

Four alligators were captured from the Peconic River in Calverton by state conservation officers Friday morning, officials said.

State Department of Environmental Conservation officials said in a press release the reptiles — ranging 2- to 4-feet-long — were spotted by Frank Naase about 8 a.m. near a dock at the Connecticut Avenue canoe launch.

The Manorville resident, who officials said frequents the dock after his morning cup of coffee, immediately contacted the DEC after noticing one of the alligators floating by.

The alligators were lethargic due to the cold water they had been exposed to, and were transferred to DEC’s regional headquarters in Stony Brook and will ultimately be sent to the Long Island Aquarium in Riverhead, officials said.

Lt. Dallas Bengel, left, and ECO Mark Simmons caught these gators Friday morning.

Lt. Dallas Bengel, left, and ECO Mark Simmons caught these gators Friday morning.

After catching a nearly 2-foot-long alligator with a catch pole, Lt. Dallas Bengel and Environmental Conservation Officer Mark Simmons observed three more alligators in the water and secured each of the animals with tape around their jaws, officials said.

Alligators are illegal to own as pets in New York. People planning to use them for exhibition, research or educational purposes are require to obtain a DEC permit, officials said.

Friday’s incident occurred a week prior to Long Island’s first illegal reptile and amphibian amnesty day.

The DEC has partnered with the Suffolk County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to allow for a “one-time only amnesty program,” where people can anonymously bring their illegal or unpermitted reptiles and amphibians without fear of prosecution.

Species that do not require permits, or are not threatened or endangered will not be accepted.

DEC Regional Director Peter Scully said in a press release he hopes residents will take advantage of the program.

“Alligators released into Long Island waters have become an all too common occurrence in recent years,” Mr. Scully said. “Unfortunately, individuals who attain these animals often find themselves incapable of caring for them as they grow, and they ultimately release them into the waters of Long Island where they are unable to survive and may pose a risk to recreationalists.”

The program will take place at Sweetbriar Nature Center, 62 Eckernkamp Drive in Smithtown, on April 27 from noon to 4 p.m.

To report any environmental crime, contact DEC’s hotline at 1-800-TIPP DEC (1-800-847-7332) or Dispatch number at (631) 444-0250.

Officials said calls will be kept confidential.

jennifer@timesreview.com

04/05/13 8:00am
04/05/2013 8:00 AM

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Life flourishes in what’s now charred forest in Manorville, where the Wildfire of 2012 destroyed homes and property.

The charred and soot-covered Kawasaki motorcycle sat propped against piles of other burned debris next to a driveway on Oakwood Drive in Manorville. It was a classic, a 1985 454 Limited bike, one of George Moretti’s prized possessions.

The motorcycle is useless now, damaged beyond repair nearly a year ago in the massive wildfire that swept through this neighborhood. The house where he and his family had lived for 25 years — and everything inside it — were destroyed by the flames and smoke that jumped out from the Pine Barrens behind his property.

“The whole house was a loss except for the framework,” he said, sitting outside his trailer this week, watching as contractors worked on the shell of his house. He can’t get what happened out of his mind.

“I know it’s been a year,” Mr. Moretti said. “I think about it every day.”

The Wildfire of 2012 burned more than 1,100 acres of the Pine Barrens in Manorville and Calverton last April 9. The seventh largest wildfire in state history started on Brookhaven National Laboratory’s Upton property and, fueled by strong winds and dry tinder on the forest floor, quickly spread south and east into the Riverhead Town section of Manorville.

The blaze raged for more than 24 hours, destroying homes, injuring local firefighters and forcing the evacuation of nearby residents as the flames drew ever closer to residential neighborhoods. Dozens of fire departments helped bring the inferno under control.

Related: Controlled fires a vital tool to prevent more wildfires

Since then, fire departments across Suffolk County have been reviewing their procedures, and environmental experts and officials say plans are in the works to create new procedures for fighting wildfires and adding additional resources like water wells to the area.

A Suffolk County task force found that “communications was the major issue” in the local response to the fire, said County Executive Steve Bellone.

“That’s what you get from having a decentralized system,” he said. “It is difficult to communicate from department to department.”

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO  |

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO |  A 1985 Kawasaki 454 Limited bike that burned in last year’s wildfire.

But neighboring fire departments, which often work together, all said they have taken steps to smooth out how they manage their resources.

The Manorville Fire Department, which took the lead, was most affected by the blaze. It lost a brush truck — an off-road vehicle designed to fight forest fires — when flames surrounded it in the Pine Barrens and volunteers had to ditch it. Some were hurt and one suffered severe burns.

A new brush truck is being built for the department, fire officials said, and the injured firefighters have recovered.

With wildfires more likely this time of year, the Manorville department has also purchased a six-wheel ATV equipped with a hose to fight “spot” brush fires, fire officials said.

Riverhead Fire Department officials have been reviewing their plans for helping other departments, said second assistant chief Kevin Brooks. A few weeks ago, Riverhead chiefs met with chiefs from Manorville, Ridge, Wading River, Yaphank and Rocky Point departments to go over “mutual aid” procedures.

“We all work together really well,” Mr. Brooks said. “The most important thing in a wildfire like that is getting resources out as fast as possible.”

Last year, the Riverhead department raced to three different locations to fight the fire, one at the Brookhaven National Lab property, one in Manorville and another on Grumman Boulevard in Calverton. The spread-out locations made it even more challenging for firefighters to coordinate their efforts, Mr. Brooks said.

“It was a difficult one from a command standpoint because it was in three different jurisdictions,” he said.

The Riverhead department’s volunteers are trained on brush truck safety and how to drive the vehicles, Mr. Brooks said, adding that some departments were considering covering trucks to prevent injuries from falling branches.

On the whole though, Mr. Brooks says the Riverhead Fire Department can handle another wildfire.

“I think we’re ready for it,” he said. “We’ve got some of the best guys around and we have a lot of experience dealing with brush fires … I think with every large fire you get better with experience.”

Fire departments from farther east also learned from the wildfire.

Jamesport firefighters spent 29 hours working in shifts to combat the flames. First assistant chief Sean McCabe said the department has since “beefed up [its] response to these types of incidents.

“When they call for tankers we send a support pumper [truck] with it,” he said. “It’s a safety thing for us now to just assign a pumper. It gives us the ability to bring more manpower with us.”

Since the wildfire, Suffolk County officials have been working on installing fire suppression wells in the Manorville area.

Bill Faulk, a former county legislative aide who now works for Brookhaven Town, said the county’s well-drilling unit has put the equipment needed for the project out to bid and will have the first well drilled in early May.

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Volunteer firemen fighting the wildfires in Manorville last year.

“They’re ready to go,” he said of the drillers. “They’re all set.”

The wells will give firefighters access to water in neighborhoods that don’t have fire hydrants.

“[The wells] are all located along the roadway,” Mr. Faulk said. “This plan is to deal with some of the more remote areas. Even on the main roads, that’s more water than you have there now.”

The county will ultimately drill four or five wells this year, with another four or five planned between Brookhaven and Riverhead Towns, he said.

Richard Amper, executive director of the Pine Barrens Society environmental group, said the wells pose no threat to the area’s ecosystem. But he said the best way to prevent future fires is to use controlled burns to clear out smaller sections of the forest, something the county and state are looking into.

“The Pine Barrens are a fire-dependent ecosystem,” Mr. Amper said. “That means they must burn periodically and have been burning for thousands of years. The burning process clears the underbrush and opens pine cones and drops their seeds on the newly cleared forest floors.”

But because the Pine Barrens are near suburban communities, fires have been “suppressed regularly in the interest of protecting public health and safety,” he said.

This leads to incidents like last year, when a wealth of tinder sparked and grew into an out-of-control wildfire in moments.

Mr. Amper said the area of the Pine Barrens that burned, now littered with the skeletons of charred trees and small patches of brush, is recovering as expected.

He said officials are planning to selectively burn 1,500 to 2,000 acres of the Pine Barrens’ 105,000 acres each year to limit the chance of large wildfires in the future. Unlike last year’s wildfire, these burns would not occur all at once but would be conducted only under the best conditions in small, 20-acre increments, Mr. Amper said.

New York State Central Pine Barrens Commission executive director John Pavacic said the commission is “taking a fresh look” at updating its fire management plan. The group is also working to educate residents on how to limit wildfire damage by protecting their homes.

The commission will meet with the Flanders Riverside Northampton Community Association next week to teach good fire habits, like keeping firewood away from the side of the house.

“That’s our first foray into getting out into the community,” Mr. Pavacic said.

The commission will also host its first springtime fire academy for firefighters at the Brookhaven National Lab property next week geared toward prescribed fires and prescribed fire management, he said.

“We are getting interest not just from within our region but outside our region as well,” he said. “We have people coming from all over the country.”

Ultimately, the Manorville wildfire served as a wake-up call to local fire departments and government officials.

“The biggest lesson is that one can never become complacent,” Mr. Pavacic said. “Even though it had been a significant amount of time since the last wildfire in 1995 you can never let your guard down.”

The Suffolk County Arson Squad and the state Department of Environmental Conservation have labeled the wildfire as “intentionally set,” though officials couldn’t be reached to give an update on the investigation. Suffolk County police have offered a $10,000 reward for information leading to an arrest.

Some residents who lost their property to the flames have recovered. But most others, like Mr. Moretti and his family, are still feeling the effects.

Paul Dill lost a pool house at his Wading River Manor Road residence, as firefighters used water from his pool to put out the fire and beat back the flames. His driveway still bears scorch marks and a nearby fence is burned to a crisp.

Mr. Dill said he has since filled in the pool and demolished the pool house.

“All things being equal, because of taxes and everything, we didn’t rebuild,” he said. He said he and his wife were fortunate not to lose their home and have done their best to move on.

“We’re not trauma people,” he said. “If something happens you get by it.”

Next door, Mr. Dill’s neighbor Neal Coleman lost tens of thousands of dollars in equipment that wasn’t covered by his insurance. Thankfully, Mr. Coleman said, his house was spared when the wind shifted just before the fire reached it.

On Oakwood Drive, Ray and Jane Kreiger were also lucky. They lost the trees in their backyard but the house was untouched.

“Fortunately, we didn’t lose anything that was sentimental or valuable,” Mr. Kreiger said.

“I’m amazed it didn’t melt the gazebo,” Ms. Kreiger said. “It was such a raging fire when it came through … we didn’t think there’d be a house standing [when we came back].”

The couple credited firefighters for drawing the line on their street and saving many homes, including theirs.

“The fire departments did a good job,” Mr. Kreiger said. “They held on, considering the massive wall of flame coming right at us. It is just amazing.”

As for the aftermath, the stumps of the burned trees on their property were pulled out only recently, after Mr. Kreiger and his son rented a lift, he said.

“We’re still cleaning up,” he said, adding the family is still waiting for payment on some insurance claims.

But not everyone has recovered yet. Stanley Krupski, who lost his repair shop on Wading River Manor Road to the fire has been battling insurance companies to get his property repaired.

“That was my life savings in the tools and parts and everything,” he said.

A year later, and he’s no closer to rebuilding his shop.

“It was very heartbreaking,” Mr. Krupski said. “I just had to turn very thing over to the attorney. I couldn’t deal with it myself.”

He said he was “disappointed” by politicians who came to stand on his property after the wildfire and voice their support but have done little to help him in his struggle.

“It was really disappointing,” he said.

Like Mr. Krupski, the Morettis down the road have some waiting to do.

Their new house was supposed to be ready a few months ago, but Hurricane Sandy and this winter’s blizzards pushed back construction.

“Everything has been delayed,” Mr. Moretti said. “If the weather had been cooperating this would have been done.”

Problems with the insurance and service companies have also caused headaches for Mr. Moretti. He said he hopes the house will be finished by the end of April. It has to be, he said; the family isn’t allowed to stay in the trailer on their property past then.

“We’re making do,” he said. “You can get frustrated but it doesn’t do you any good. There’s nothing you can do about it.”

psquire@timesreview.com

03/13/13 1:42pm
03/13/2013 1:42 PM
PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | An East Moriches firefighter walks towards the scene of a deadly house fire Wednesday morning.

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | An East Moriches firefighter walks towards the scene of a deadly house fire in Manorville Wednesday morning.

Riverhead firefighters helped put out a Manorville house fire after which one woman and a dog were found dead and a man was taken to an area hospital Wednesday morning, authorities said.

The Manorville Fire Department first received a call about 9:30 a.m. for a building on fire. The house, located at the end of a long driveway at 218 Eastport Manor Road, was in flames when firefighters arrived on the scene, said Suffolk County Fire Marshal Joe Kuethen.

Firefighters located a woman’s body inside the house during a search, he said. A dog was also found dead inside the home, police said.

A resident of the house, identified by police as 68-year-old Charles Woolsey was found outside the burning home, authorities said. Mr. Woolsey, who was unconcious, was taken to Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center in East Patchogue for treatment of smoke inhalation, police said.

An update on Mr. Woolsey’s condition was not available.

The house had a message written across its roof, according to a Newsday report. Officials declined to comment on the writing.

Riverhead fire officials got the request for aid about 10:15 a.m., and sent to the fire scene, said Riverhead first assistant chief Joseph Raynor. Riverhead firefighters helped to douse any remaining fires on the property.

Riverhead firefighters were released from the scene at 1:20 p.m.

Firefighters and ambulance volunteers from the Eastport, Center Moriches, Westhampton Beach, East Moriches, and Quogue Fire Departments were also called to the fire.

Suffolk County police are investigating the fire, and both homicide and arson squads arrived on scene later in the afternoon to investigate due to the fatality. Anyone with information about the fire is asked to call Suffolk County Homicide Squad detectives at (631) 852-6392.

psquire@timesreview.com

12/30/12 8:00am
12/30/2012 8:00 AM

PAUL SQUIRE FILE PHOTO | Governor Andrew Cuomo shakes hands with a Ridge firefighter in Calverton April 10.

The largest Long Island wildfire in over a decade burned more than 1,000 acres of forest and property from Ridge to Calverton — with other, smaller fires breaking out in Flanders, Yaphank and elsewhere — during a prolonged dry spell in April.

The larger “Wildfire of 2012” damaged dozens of structures and forced evacuations in neighborhoods along Wading River Manor Road in Manorville. At its peak, a plume of smoke could be seen from much of Suffolk County and Connecticut.

Manorville firefighter Andrew Preli said the fire was like nothing he’s ever seen in his three years of volunteer service.

“I’ve been on a bunch of brush fires,” he said. “Nothing this crazy, nothing this big. It sounded like a train coming through.

“Everywhere I looked something was on fire.”

Firefighters from more than 100 departments across Suffolk and Nassau counties spent over two days bringing the flames under control. One Manorville volunteer, William Hille, 35, suffered severe burns to his face after he and two colleagues had to abandon a brush truck that caught fire in the woods.

The truck was destroyed.

All responders were later honored with a “firefighter appreciation festival” at the Brookhaven Amphitheater, which featured free concerts for volunteers and their families.

Investigators later determined the fire was intentionally set on undeveloped property at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site.

Suffolk County police are offering a $10,000 reward for any information leading to an arrest.

mwhite@timesreview.com

10/21/12 12:26pm
10/21/2012 12:26 PM

A Coram man’s blood alcohol content was nearly three times the legal limit when he was pulled over heading east near exit 69 of the Long Island Expressway in Manorville early Sunday morning, the Suffolk County Sheriffs’ office said.

Hamza Hussain, 25, was arrested by deputy sheriffs on a charge of aggravated DWI after he was observed swerving and pulled over, sheriffs said.

The defendant submitted to a breath test resulting in a .20 percent blood alcohol content, sheriffs said.

08/09/12 4:00am
08/09/2012 4:00 AM

Some things make too much sense not to be pursued.

Manorville resident Clare Bennett’s request this week to have Manorville ambulances instead of Riverhead ambulances respond to calls on her Oakwood Drive block and the immediate neighborhood is one of them.

Such a change would affect about 60 families that live at the edge of town and find themselves in the Riverhead Volunteer Ambulance district, even though they’re much closer to Manorville Community Ambulance headquarters. And we’re talking light-years closer, considering what’s at stake.

The Riverhead Volunteer Ambulance headquarters on Osborn Avenue is 10.2 miles from Oakwood Drive, while the Manorville ambulance headquarters on South Street is 3.75 miles from Oakwood. It’s actually surprising it’s taken this long for folks in these communities to speak out.

Ms. Bennett begged Riverhead Town Board members for help Tuesday, saying that she had to wait quite a while (40 minutes, a number Riverhead ambulance officials found hard to fathom) for an ambulance to arrive at her home for three separate medical emergencies in recent years. Each time she had to wait, even while knowing a row of shiny Manorville Community Ambulance vehicles stood ready just a few minutes away.

The situation is unacceptable. But because Riverhead Volunteer Ambulance is funded by a tax base that’s entirely in Riverhead Town and Manorville Community Ambulance is funded by a tax base that’s entirely in Brookhaven Town, Supervisor Sean Walter explained to Ms. Bennett on Tuesday, the only way Manorville ambulances could be allowed to respond to a Riverhead Town address would be for Riverhead to contract with Manorville for ambulance services.

But he also said the board would do what it could to make that happen and that he personally would contact Brookhaven Supervisor Mark Lesko to get the ball rolling.

So often, requests like these — residents’ imploring local officials to try to fix blatant problems with school, fire or other taxing districts — are dismissed as being impossible to achieve. So Mr. Walter’s response was encouraging.

Ms. Bennett also made it clear her request has nothing to do with dissatisfaction with the work of Riverhead volunteers. Riverhead ambulance officials should not take the Manorville resident’s request as a slight and, in response, try to jealously protect their “territory,” which is known to happen from time to time among proud emergency responders.

Should town officials in Riverhead and Brookhaven not act, Ms. Bennett vowed to circulate a petition among her neighbors, whom she said support her. This is a serious situation with a logical solution. It should not have to come to residents needing to petition en masse.

08/07/12 8:08pm
08/07/2012 8:08 PM

BARBARAELLEN KOCH FILE PHOTO | A Riverhead Volunteer Ambulance vehicle parked in Riverhead earlier this summer.

Residents of Oakwood Drive in Manorville live in the Riverhead Volunteer Ambulance district, but they’re much closer to the Manorville Community Ambulance.

That’s why some residents from that area are hoping to find a way to let Manorville ambulance respond to calls in that neighborhood.

Clare Bennett of Oakwood Drive asked the Riverhead Town Board on Tuesday to try to allow calls in her neighborhood to be handled by Manorville.

“I’m basically a healthy person but I have needed an ambulance three times in the last five years,” Ms. Bennett said.

The first two times, she said, the Riverhead ambulance took 40 minutes to get to her home, and the third time, when she had a heart issue, her husband got there from Hampton Bays before the ambulance arrived.

On another instance, “When my eight year old nephew needed an emergency appendectomy, he knew something was wrong, but he did not want to call an ambulance,” she said.

“The Manorville ambulance is three minutes away,” she said.

Ms. Bennett said she spoke with the Riverhead Police Department on the issue and was told that on the first two calls, the Riverhead ambulance got lost looking for her house due to a mistake on the e911 system, which showed her address as being on Oakwood Drive in Calverton.

There is an Oakwood Drive in Calverton, close to Long Island Sound, and its almost 10 miles from Oakwood Drive in Manorville.

The E911 system automatically displays the address of a caller for dispatchers without the caller needing to say anything. Historically, having two or more roads with the same name can be troublesome for the system.

Kim Pokorny, the president of the Riverhead Volunteer Ambulance board of directors, said this is the first she’s heard of any problems getting to Manorville.

“The only thing I can think of is if the 911 call gets picked up Suffolk County Police E911, there could be a delay, because surely it doesn’t take 40 minutes for us to get there,” Ms. Pokorny said.

The problem with the E911 giving the Calverton address also could be a factor, she said.

Because the Riverhead Volunteer Ambulance is funded by a tax base that’s entirely in Riverhead Town, and the Manorville Community Ambulance is funded by a tax base that’s entirely in Brookhaven Town, the only way Manorville ambulance could be allowed to respond to a Riverhead Town address would be for Riverhead to contract for services with Manorville in this neighborhood, according to Supervisor Sean Walter.

“We don’t have a problem doing that,” Mr. Walter told Ms. Bennett. “I think this board will do that.”

Councilman John Dunleavy said he is already working on that issue.

Mr. Walter said he will call Brookhaven Supervisor Mark Lesco to begin negotiations on the plan.

The supervisor said he’s unsure how to fix the problem with E911, however.

Ms. Bennett said there are 12 residents on Oakwood Drive in Manorville and 61 families in the immediate area with Manorville addresses in Riverhead Town.

She said her neighbors are ready to begin a petition drive.

According to Yahoo maps, the Riverhead ambulance headquarters on Osborn Avenue is 10.2 miles from Oakwood Drive in Manorville, while the Manorville ambulance headquarters on South Street is 3.75 miles from Oakwood Drive.

Ms. Bennett said she didn’t want to slight ambulance volunteers with her request.

“We’re very grateful to the men and women who do this,” she told the Town Board.

The Oakwood Drive neighborhood is the area that was hardest hit by the wildfire that spread through the Manorville and Calverton areas earlier this year. The area is just north of the Peconic River, which is the border between the two towns.

tgannon@timesreview.com


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04/12/12 8:30am
04/12/2012 8:30 AM

TIM GANNON PHOTO | Irish, with Catrina Tedesco, who walked the horse from Annie's Acres stables in Manorville to EPCAL.

“I went in there and it was chaos,” said “Big John” Savastano of Manorville, describing the scene at the Annie’s Acres horse stable on Wading River Manor Road as Monday’s wildfires approached. “There were 30 to 40 fire trucks that went up the road when we were there.”

The fire was heading their way.

With the flames fast approaching, horse owners at the many Manorville area stables were in a panic, using social media and other methods to call for help in moving horses to safety.

But in the end, the members of the “horse community,” as they call themselves, pulled together to make sure all the horses were safe.

“The horse community was wonderful,” said Carolyn Jolly, co-owner of Hidden Pond Stables on North Street in Manorville. “Everybody stepped up.”

Some horses were walked to safety, while others were loaded onto trailers and taken elsewhere temporarily, Ms. Jolly said.

“At one time, there must have been 200 horses walking down the street with their bridles,” said Joe Williams, county commissioner of Fire Rescue and Emergency Services. Initially, police were not letting horse trailers in because the roads were closed to traffic due to the fire, Ms. Jolly said, but the authorities eventually relented.

Hidden Pond Stables evacuated 40 of its 83 horses, Ms. Jolly said. By the time those animals were moved, the fire was under better control and, with danger no longer imminent, the rest of the horses were allowed to remain.

Ms. Jolly said word got out via email and Facebook that help was needed and, eventually, there were about 50 volunteers, including owners of horse transport companies donating their time and trailers.

She said the authorities didn’t supply any trailers or suggest ways to get the horses out.

“The horse community did it [themselves],” she said, though no stables were damaged in the fires.

Lynne Weissbard, owner of Sundance Stables on North Street, said she didn’t evacuate her horses. Instead, she rounded them up in the center of the property while the fire department wet down the perimeter. And it worked.

“If the fire came in from the side of the property, we would have had to evacuate, but the fire blasted past us in about five minutes,” Ms. Weissbard said.

With her horses safe, she sent all the people who came to her stable to help over to Annie’s Acres instead.

“The fire had moved past here, and we were OK, so I really wanted them to help where they were most needed,” said Ms. Weissbard, who spent 18 years with the Manorville Fire Department herself.

The volunteers included people who kept their horses at Sundance Stables, as well as others in the horse profession, she said.

“We all kept in touch with one another and bonded together,” she said. “It’s a small group of people with a passion for horses. I had probably 50 to 60 people volunteering here, from different professions. They were terrific.”

She said everything was under control and organized and everyone involved made sure that horses and buildings were not exposed to fire.

“Because we did that, we’re not out searching for our animals today,” Ms. Weissbard said. “They’re here.”

Catrina Tedesco of Manorville took her horse, Irish, from Annie’s Acres and walked him about two miles to Grumman Boulevard to get him out of harm’s way.

She originally started walking him along Old River Road, but the horse was getting spooked by passing cars, so she walked him through the Swan Lake golf course to Grumman Boulevard, marching the horse past an array of fire trucks and emergency vehicles.

Annie’s Acres, which boards about 60 horses, was spared by the fire, but the house directly across the street from the stable was destroyed.

tgannon@timesreview.com