09/27/14 6:01pm
09/27/2014 6:01 PM
The East End Arts gallery on East Main Street in Riverhead. (Credit: File)

The East End Arts gallery on East Main Street in Riverhead. (Credit: File)

Six artists judged best in show during East End Arts’ 2013 exhibits will be featured in the annual Winners’ Show at the Riverhead gallery.

The artists are Central Islip poet Dolores Cinquemani, East Hampton poet Toby Haynes, Riverhead photographer Katherine Liepe-Levinson, East Quogue mixed media artist Jonathan Pearlman, New York photographer Nancy Scherl and painter Win Zibeon of Blauvelt, N.Y.  (more…)

09/27/14 6:00pm

ENT

Dr. Erin McGintee of ENT and Allergy Associates in Aquebogue will give a talk, ‘The Scoop on Seasonal Allergies,’ at Cutchogue New Suffolk Library Tuesday, Oct. 7, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. She will discuss symptoms and management of allergies to common triggers like ragweed and grass pollen, as well as a meat allergy that can be caused by the bite of the Lone Star tick. For information and registration, call 734-6360.

• San Simeon by the Sound’s final Brown Bag Lunch Lecture of the season is set for Wednesday, Oct. 1, from 1-2 p.m. with guest speaker chef John Ross, who will discuss “The Evolution of the North Fork as a Culinary Region.” The cost, including lunch provided by Erik’s, is $25. For tickets, call San Simeon at 477-2110, ext. 252.

• Fall yoga classes with Rosemary are now forming at North Fork Women’s Resource Center, above Capital One Bank in Cutchogue. Gentle yoga meets Tuesdays and Fridays at 9 a.m.; EasyStretch men’s yoga, Thursdays at 9:15 a.m.; and easy chair yoga, Fridays at 10:45 a.m. Call 631-604-0107.

To send Health Beat news, email dfates@timesreview.com, fax to 298-3287, or mail to Times/Review Newspapers, P.O. Box 1500, Mattituck, NY 11952.

Copy deadline: Friday at 5 p.m. to appear the following week.

09/19/14 11:43am
09/19/2014 11:43 AM
The Second Street firehouse was obtained by Riverhead Town in 2011 in a land swap with the Riverhead Fire District. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch file)

The Second Street firehouse was obtained by Riverhead Town in 2011 in a land swap with the Riverhead Fire District. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch file)

A brewery is one of the uses Suffolk Theater owner Bob Castaldi says he’s considering for the Second Street firehouse, which he has offered to buy from Riverhead Town for $500,000.

But he says he doesn’t have a deal in place just yet; that’s just a use being considered.

“There’s a lot of things up in the air and nothing is concrete yet,” Mr. Castaldi told the News-Review. “I’ve got a lot of ideas and that is one of the things floating around.”

Mr. Castaldi didn’t identify the brewer, though a co-owner of a company called Long Beard Brewing later confirmed they were looking at the location. (more…)

09/14/14 6:00am
09/14/2014 6:00 AM
Wells Homestead Farmstand in Aquebogue. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch, file)

Wells Homestead Farmstand in Aquebogue. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch, file)

Well, here we are again. It’s September, back-to-school time on our North Fork. Teachers in many classrooms will ask youngsters to write a few paragraphs describing their summer vacations. And those youngsters will groan and then settle down, attempting to use big, important-sounding words, trying to impress their teacher.  (more…)

09/13/14 8:00am
09/13/2014 8:00 AM
Randy Clement (left) and Mile Weber Jr. of Clement Carpentry of Jamesport working on the Witch's Hat restoration Thursday morning.

Randy Clement (left) and Mike Weber Jr. of Clement Carpentry of Jamesport working on the Witch’s Hat restoration Thursday morning.

The curiously shaped “Witch’s Hat” in Aquebogue is getting a much-needed makeover thanks to donations from area businesses and volunteers.

Spearheaded by the Riverhead Landmarks Preservation Commission, along with the Save Main Road preservation advocacy group, the roadside structure — named an official town landmark in 1987 — will be restored back to its original specifications.

The stand was built in 1926 by Henry and Lena Flemming, and used to sell gas, candy, cigarettes, and eventually ice cream to motorists from the 1930’s to 1970.  (more…)

08/31/14 8:00am
08/31/2014 8:00 AM
The airbase was established in 1946 and is currently used by a few area pilots. (Credit: Carrie Miller)

The airbase was established in 1946 and is currently used by a few area pilots. (Credit: Carrie Miller)

The state Department of Environmental Conservation has proposed removing Mattituck Airbase from New York’s Superfund program, saying the property no longer poses a threat to public health or the environment, DEC officials said.

Before it makes a final determination, the DEC will accept public comment for the next month. The property is currently on the state’s Inactive Hazardous Waste Disposal Site list, which identifies properties being investigated for potential hazardous waste and outlines any cleanup efforts taking place.

The airbase, located off New Suffolk Avenue in Mattituck, is one of 11 properties currently being investigated across Riverhead and Southold towns.

It was created in 1946, when Parker Wickham of Mattituck, who overhauled airplane engines during World War II, converted part of his family’s New Suffolk Avenue potato farm into a small airport and plane engine rebuilding shop under the name Mattituck Services, according to previous Suffolk Times coverage. The property is still owned by the Wickham family.

The site currently operates as an “informal airbase used by a few area pilots,” said Southold Supervisor Scott Russell.

The 12-acre site included a half-acre parcel where chemicals — including fuels, oils and cleaners — were once used for maintenance and repair work, according to state DEC officials.

According to the state agency’s listing, solvent rinses and wastewater used on the property were discharged to leaching pools in the area from 1946 to 1979, leaving elevated levels of copper, iron, nickel, zinc, lead and cadmium in nearby soils, as well as several pesticide ingredients.

To remedy the pollution, 25 tons of contaminated but non-hazardous soils were excavated from the area surrounding the leaching pools in 1997, with excavation extending at least three feet below the water table, the DEC listing states. The area was then packed with clean fill and closed.

Soil testing conducted in November 2013 found no lingering impact from the contaminants in question and it was determined that no public or environmental threats exist at the site, according to DEC officials.

Mr. Russell said he’s encouraged to hear that the historic site stands to be removed from the Superfund program.

“If the DEC is satisfied, naturally we are,” he said. “Certainly it is in the town’s interest to see all [of these areas] get remediated and delisted.”

Agency officials are asking that any public comments regarding Mattituck Airbase be mailed to Cynthia Whitfield, project manager, NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, Division of Environmental Remediation, Remedial Bureau A, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-7015 or emailed to cynthia.whitfield@dec.ny.gov. You can also call 518-402-9564.

The comment period will close Oct. 5 and a final decision will be made on or after Oct. 26, according to the DEC release.

cmiller@timesreview.com

08/23/14 12:00pm
08/23/2014 12:00 PM
Lone star ticks, seen here at different life stages, are among the most abundant tick on the East End. (Credit: Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County)

Lone star ticks, seen here at different life stages, are among the most abundant tick on the East End. (Credit: Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County)

Is that a tick, a chigger, or a tiny spider?

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County is working on creating a handy smartphone app to help East Enders get an answer to that question and many more with the touch of a button. (Spoiler alert: There are no chiggers on Long Island.) (more…)