02/06/14 2:20pm
02/06/2014 2:20 PM

deli_houseThere are five open houses scheduled for the North Fork this weekend.

We can give you a sneak preview.

The weekend’s crop includes a two-story house that once held a speakeasy during Prohibition, but the building was probably best known to longtime Greenport residents as the location of Rouse’s Delicatessen.

See northforker.com for full listings and photos of all the houses.

02/04/14 10:53am
02/04/2014 10:53 AM

KATHARINE SCHROEDER FILE PHOTO | The Fresh Air Fund is looking for volunteers to host urban children this summer to help provide a summer experience, such as visiting the beach in South Jamesport.

Live on the North Fork and want to make a difference this year? Your backyard and the region’s starry sky could be just the ticket when it comes to making this summer unforgettable for a New York City child. (more…)

01/28/14 3:23pm
01/28/2014 3:23 PM
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IMAGE

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IMAGE

Up to four inches of snow might fall on the North Fork late tonight and early tomorrow, according to National Weather Service predictions.

“We’re expecting two to four inches of snow on the twin forks of Long Island starting after midnight and into tomorrow morning,” NWS meteorologist David Stark said.

The snowfall, he said, will be light, powdery and dry — not heavy, like last week’s snowstorm that dumped nearly a foot of snow across the region. Although warmer temperatures yesterday helped melt some of the remains of that storm, below-freezing temperatures are expected to remain until Friday.

A Hazardous Weather Outlook was issued today by the NWS for southeast New York, southern Connecticut and northeast New Jersey.

To read the full report, click here.

ryoung@timesreview.com

01/01/14 8:20pm
01/01/2014 8:20 PM
BARBARAELLEN KOCH FILE PHOTO | A Riverhead Town snow plow in Jamesport.

BARBARAELLEN KOCH FILE PHOTO | A Riverhead Town snow plow in Jamesport.

There’s snow in the forecast for the North Fork starting early Thursday and running into Friday afternoon, with blizzard conditions reaching the area Thursday night, according to the National Weather Service.

It’s likely to snow early Thursday morning and into the day, but only about an inch is expected, though it will be windy, weather officials said.

The snow starting Thursday night and running through Friday is expected to drop three to seven inches over the region at first, before another one to three inches falls later.

The coastal storm is expected to taper off before 2 p.m. Friday, according to the NWS forecast.

The NWS has issued a blizzard warning for this time, with “dangerously cold wind chills. Blowing and drifting snow will produce dangerous travel conditions,” the warning reads. “Wind chills from 10 degrees below to zero to around zero will produce extreme cold impacts.”

12/13/13 5:30pm
12/13/2013 5:30 PM
PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | More than 40 worshippers ran from Greenport to Riverhead Thursday afternoon to deliver a holy flame honoring Our Lady of Guadalupe, a popular religious symbol.

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | More than 40 worshippers ran from Greenport to Riverhead Thursday afternoon to deliver a holy flame honoring Our Lady of Guadalupe, a popular religious symbol.

A small crowd was gathered around a blue pickup truck parked outside St. Agnes Church in Greenport just after noon on Thursday for the big unveiling.

As one of the men began pulled off the wrapping protecting a statue strapped to the bed of the truck, the worshippers circled the truck to take pictures.

A small statue of Our Lady of Guadalupe — a beloved religious icon for Latin American Christians — was perched on a cherry-colored wooden pedestal called an anda, which was decorated with flowers laid on fake grass.

An arch framing the idol was interwoven with roses. The display took almost a month to prepare, organizers said.

As four men carefully carried the platform into the church, another group was rushing back to the East End from New York City by van, bearing a sacred flame to commemorate the day.

For these devout Hispanic men and women, the hours of preparation were worth it.

“It’s to say thank you,” said Riverhead resident Tarciso Cerafico — who helped build the tribute — through a translator. “For my health, for my family’s health, for what I’ve received here in the United States.”

More than 40 runners — men, women, and children from across the North Fork — helped carry the sacred flame from Greenport to a special mass in Riverhead Thursday evening to honor the religious symbol on her feast day.

Our Lady of Guadalupe, also known as the Virgin of Guadalupe, is a title for the Virgin Mary connected to a specific image of the holy figure that is believed to have been revealed to a devout Catholic in Mexico on the man’s cloak in the 1500s.

Though Our Lady of Guadalupe was originally a Mexican icon, she has since spread to areas across Latin America as a symbol of peace and protection.

“They dedicate everything they do to be under the protection of Our Lady of Guadalupe,” said Sister Margaret Smyth, founder of the North Fork Spanish Apostolate.

The Virgin of Guadalupe is celebrated each Dec. 12, the day the image was originally revealed, according to the church. While Latin American Christians on the North Fork have celebrated her feast day in the past, organizers decided to try something special this year.

A group of worshippers drove into New York City to retrieve a holy flame that had been run from the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico City to New York City over the past 80 days.

The flame was part of the ceremony held at St. Patricks Cathedral. As residents gathered in Riverhead for an early morning mass Thursday morning, the volunteers lit a lantern with the flame in the city and drove it back out to Greenport.

Organizer Jose Galvan said the flame had been a tradition in celebrations in New York City for years, but the ceremonies were too far for most North Fork residents.

“It seemed like it was impossible for us to go in and do it,” Mr. Galvan said. Someone came up with the idea to bring the flame out East, and the community rallied around the plan.

“We got a lot of people for our first time,” he said.

The flame was transferred to a hand-made torch and carried into St. Agnes Church on Front Street.

Worshippers sang hymns in Spanish and prayed as the display Mr. Cerafico helped build was laid at the head of the altar in the church.

After blessing the statue and the flame, the group of runners loaded up the statue into the back of a pickup truck. They then took turns running with the flame along Route 25 into Riverhead, with the truck carrying the statue driving close behind.

Local police in Southold and Riverhead approved the parade in advance and helped keep the runners safe, Sister Margaret said.

The group ran for hours, finishing the roughly 20-mile journey later that evening at St. John’s the Evangelist Church in time for the second mass at 7 p.m.

“We put ourselves in her hands,” said Oscar Cruz, a Greenport man who helped carry the flame. “It means everything for us. So we’re glad and we’re happy to do something for her.”

psquire@timesreview.com

12/10/13 7:00am
12/10/2013 7:00 AM
CARRIE MILLER PHOTO | Scallops for sale at Southold Fish Market.

CARRIE MILLER PHOTO | Scallops for sale at Southold Fish Market.

This year’s scalloping season has area baymen working harder and residents paying more for those tasty, blue-eyed gems of the Peconic.

The cautious optimism that greeted the Nov. 4 opening day of the local Atlantic bay scallop season is no more, as those searching for and those selling the popular shellfish said the season is “worse” than most.

“It can take a half a day at least to get one [bushel],” said Ed Densieski of Riverhead. “My numbers are definitely off.”

While commercial baymen are permitted to harvest up to 10 bushels a day, Mr. Densieski said a full day’s work is only landing him two or three bushels at best.

Southold Baymen’s Association president Nathan Andruski said he was also seeing limited landings, catching about three or four bushels a day – depending on the weather.

While area fishermen are feeling the pressure out on the water, area residents are feeling it at the register.

The cost for a pound of Peconic bay scallops has ticked up from an initial $18 to the current cost of $21, said Southold Fish Market owner Charlie Manwaring.

“The price is definitely up,” Mr. Manwaring said.

But, he added, it’s better to buy scallops on this side of the bay rather than in the pricier “Hamptons” market.

“It is a lot cheaper on this side than it is on the South Fork,” Mr. Manwaring said.

A pound of scallops at Cor-J Seafood in Hampton Bays will run you $24.75, or $29.95 at Clamman Seafood Market in Southampton, according to sales associates at each location.

Mr. Manwaring said the quantity is “probably half of what we were doing last year — and the price last year was cheap because there were so many around,” he said. “I sell out every day.”

Ken Homan of Braun Seafood in Cutchogue said a pound of scallops cost just $12 about this time last year, adding that it has been difficult to freeze scallops to offer to customers year round.

“Last year at this time I had frozen over 6,000 pounds and this year I have only froze over a couple hundred,” he said, saying it might impact the availability later on.

The scalloping season ends on March 31.

cmiller@timesreview.com

12/05/13 8:00am
12/05/2013 8:00 AM

Property owners across the North Fork and beyond now have easy access to information concerning contaminated areas they may – or may not – have known existed in their neighborhoods.

The state Department of Environmental Conservation has released information about 1,950 different locations across the state that have been investigated for possible environmental contamination, according to DEC officials.

Prior to the release, only two locations in Southold Town and the Riverhead area had been made public on the DEC’s website, the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant in Calverton (more commonly known as EPCAL) and the Mattituck Airbase, said DEC spokesman Aphrodite Montalvo.

Though nine other locations have been added to the website, none of those locations have been newly discovered as contaminated sites, she said.

The information can be accessed on the DEC’s website along with about 2,500 sites that had already been made public and listed online, good for 4,450 total sites.

The newly added sites were mostly unknown to the public until now, local environmentalists said.

Jenn Hartnagel, a senior environmental advocate for the nonprofit Group for the East End, said she had been calling on the state agency “for some time” to release information about sites it has been investigating, in the interest of “transparency.”

“The earlier we know that their might be a problem, the more capable we are with dealing with them and making informed decisions,” she said.

Making the information readily accessible to the public gives people and local governments the opportunity to better understand these locations, and the extent of potentially hazardous conditions associated with groundwater and soil contamination, she said.

Prior to the release, information about these sites was only available by request, largely because the information is considered to be preliminary, incomplete, or not verified, Ms. Montalvo cautioned.

“Information about these sites can easily be misunderstood,” she said. “Their mere existence may unnecessarily raise concern about human exposures or environmental impacts before the sites are better characterized. Due to the nature of this information, significant conclusions or decisions should not be based solely upon the released summaries.”

The DEC released information about the sites in response to an increasing number of requests for property information, often associated with buying and selling property, according to an agency release announcing the measure. Below is information on sites, as provided online. The number matches the map above.

1) Calverton NWIRP 02 (EPCAL)

Grumman Boulevard, Calverton

As many as 230 gallons of fuel are recorded to have been spilled in the area. Groundwater contaminants found included fuel-type and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), believed to be from unreported spills of solvents used to clean the aircraft engines and fuel systems. Potable water that is contaminated above drinking water standards is currently being treated.

2) Riverhead Landfill

Youngs Avenue, Riverhead

This facility accepted municipal and industrial wastes, and construction and demolition debris. In 1980, spent industrial solvents of unknown composition were disposed at an on-site brush dump. The results of the most recent sampling, done in June of 1992, indicate that no substance of concern was found to be migrating from the landfill.

3) Riverhead Hortonsphere Site

West Main Street, Riverhead

Manufactured gas and stored natural gas. Began operations sometime prior to 1944 and was dismantled and removed in 1998. The site has been undeveloped since.

4) L.I. Horticultural Research Lab

3059 Sound Avenue, Riverhead

Application tanks containing pesticides were periodically washed and cleaned with rinse waters discharged into two leaching structures located on-site, which led to the contamination of subsurface soil.

A well survey was conducted in the area and no site-related contamination has been detected in the private wells. Contaminated surface soils were excavated and the remaining deep soils will be covered with an impervious liner to minimize further groundwater contamination.

5) Altaire Pharmaceuticals Inc.

311 West Lane, Aquebogue

This facility is being tracked because it once managed a type of hazardous waste.

It has not been determined whether any environmental releases have caused concern at this facility. As information for this site becomes available, it will be reviewed by the NYSDOH to determine if site contamination presents public health exposure concerns.

6) Graphics of Peconic Inc.

300 Pleasure Drive, Flanders

This facility is being tracked because it once managed a type of hazardous waste.

It has not been determined whether any environmental releases of concern have occurred at this facility. As information for this site becomes available, it will be reviewed by the NYSDOH to determine if site contamination presents public health exposure concerns.

7) Mattituck Airbase

Airway Drive (off New Suffolk Ave), Mattituck

Solvent rinses and wastewater from the facility were discharged to leaching pools until the pools were closed in 1979. Analyses of samples from the pools indicated elevated levels of copper, iron, nickel, zinc, lead, and cadmium. Contaminated soils were excavated and disposed of in 1997.

8) Southold Landfill

Cox Lane, north of Route 48, Cutchogue

This facility accepted municipal and domestic wastes, demolition, and landscaping debris, and cesspool and septic tank wastes from 1951 to Oct. 1993.

Based on the information contained in the reports, the wastes disposed at this site are not hazardous.

9) Cutchogue Freone Plume

Harbor Land and Oak Street, Cutchogue

The Suffolk County Department of Health Services has discovered VOCs in private homeowner wells in the area. A later investigation found no sources of VOCs breaching groundwater standards and it was further determined that there is no longer a threat in this area.

10) Southold Acetylene Gas Production

370 Hobart Road, Southold

The acetylene manufacturing facility, which was operated by the Southold Lighting Company from 1906 to 1921, produced acetylene gas for the surrounding community. A number of organic and inorganic compounds are present at the site in surface soil.

11) Mitchell Property

115 Front Street, Greenport

Fourteen underground storage tanks containing gasoline, diesel fuel, fuel oil or waste oils had leaked, impacting soils in the vicinity of the tanks. Soils were later excavated and disposed of off-site. The site has since been remediated.

11/12/13 11:01am
11/12/2013 11:01 AM
BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Segulls fight for real estate space along the Peconic River Tuesday.

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Segulls fight for real estate space along the Peconic River Tuesday.

The Riverhead area and much of eastern Long Island saw the season’s first dusting of snow Tuesday morning.

According to the National Weather Service, a cold front that swept through the area in the early morning hours resulted in a mix of rain and snow — and eventually just snow — falling over the region.

The snow persisted through the morning commute, from about 6 a.m., and tapered off about 10 a.m.

(Read more below.)

And while Nov. 12 might seem like an early date for snow, with the official start of winter still 40 days away, recent years have seen even earlier first snowfalls.

Nov. 8, 2011, marked a messy commute for Long Island motorists as well, with sleet and snow flurries falling over the area.

That figure was bested by an Oct. 29, 2011 nor’easter, which resulted in a significant amount of snowfall and a rare “white Halloween” two days later.