01/03/15 7:00am
01/03/2015 7:00 AM
Peconic Bay Medical Center is seeking to build a 3,500-square-foot medical site in the corner of Gateway Plaza, where Bob’s Discount Furniture is located. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

Peconic Bay Medical Center is seeking to build a 3,500-square-foot medical site in the corner of Gateway Plaza, where Bob’s Discount Furniture is located. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

To the editor:

Re: the Dec. 25 article on the PBMC Health application to build an annex on Route 58, in front of Bob’s Furniture.  (more…)

07/10/14 4:44pm
07/10/2014 4:44 PM
Sue Condreras of Northville (in navy) with PBMC officials during a memorial ceremony Thursday afternoon. (Credit: Carrie Miller)

Sue Condreras of Northville (kneeling) with PBMC officials during a memorial ceremony Thursday afternoon. (Credit: Carrie Miller)

Peconic Bay Medical Center caregivers spent time Thursday afternoon memorializing a caregiver of its own — a six-year-old German shepherd named Jesse — who had dedicated her life to helping others.  (more…)

04/10/14 3:00pm
04/10/2014 3:00 PM
Peconic Bay in Riverhead

The entrance to Peconic Bay Medical Center in Riverhead. (Credit: file photo)

North Fork hospitals are seeing a transformation in the local health care market — with demand shifting from inpatient services, provided in a hospital setting, to outpatient services, provided at clinics and doctor’s offices.  (more…)

01/30/14 12:00pm
01/30/2014 12:00 PM
CARRIE MILLER PHOTO | (left to right) Town Councilman John Dunleavy, Maureen O'Connor, program director of the Cancer Services Program of Eastern Suffolk County at Peconic Bay Medical Center, Dr. Claire Bradley, board president of American Cancer Society Eastern Division, Dr. Brett Ruffo, colorectal and general surgeon at PBMC, Sherry Patterson, chair of PBMC Health foundation, Joseph Abbate, colorectal cancer survivor, Dennis McDermott, owner of The Riverhead Project, Legislator Al Krupski, Janine Nebons, general manager of Tanger Outlets, and town councilwoman Jodi Giglio.

CARRIE MILLER PHOTO | (left to right) Town Councilman John Dunleavy; Maureen O’Connor, program director of the Cancer Services Program of Eastern Suffolk County at Peconic Bay Medical Center; Dr. Claire Bradley, board president of American Cancer Society Eastern Division; Dr. Brett Ruffo, colorectal and general surgeon at PBMC; Sherry Patterson, chair of PBMC Health foundation; Joseph Abbate, colorectal cancer survivor; Dennis McDermott, owner of The Riverhead Project; Legislator Al Krupski; Janine Nebons, general manager of Tanger Outlets and town councilwoman Jodi Giglio.

Area businesses will “Paint the Town Blue” this March — not for Blue Wave pride — but to increase awareness about an illness and potentially save lives. (more…)

11/21/13 12:51pm
11/21/2013 12:51 PM

Surgeons from across the country are coming to Riverhead for the opportunity to observe and learn how to do operating procedures using the da Vinci surgical system.

Peconic Bay Medical Center has been chosen by Intuitive Surgical, the maker of the da Vinci Si surgical system, as the first case observation site on Long Island, and one of only a few in the entire Northeast, according to a hospital release.

Starting Monday, visiting surgeons have been able to watch surgeries in real-time as Dr. Agostino Cervone, general surgeon at PBMC Health, explains the procedure he is performing and the techniques being used.

To use the machine, the surgeon — sitting at a separate console — operates two remote robot hands via video screen, hand controls and foot pedals. There are two monitors, one for each eye, giving the doctor 3D depth perception while operating, hospital officials said.

Participants can interact and ask questions as they observe, and then try out their skills on the hospital’s da Vinci skills simulator – which surgeons use as a training device master various robot-assisted surgery techniques.

According to the release from the hospital, the da Vinci surgical system uses single site incision, which eliminates the need for large incisions – reducing blood loss and tissue damage to a fraction of what happens in traditional surgery.

“By educating other physicians and surgeons about the latest advances in robotic surgery, we are ultimately helping more patients who will benefit from this type of surgery,” Dr. Cervone said.

“This is a major advancement for our hospital,” said Andrew Mitchell, hospital president and CEO. “Our robotic surgery program and highly skilled and dedicated team is committed to continually improving the health and well-being of the communities we serve through the pursuit of excellence in healthcare and state-of-the-art technology.”