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04/26/16 8:41am
04/26/2016 8:41 AM

The Riverhead Landmarks Preservation Commission okays the demolition of the former Sears building and three adjacent downtown buildings Monday.

Riverhead Town’s Landmarks Preservation Commission on Monday approved the demolition of the former Sears building and three buildings east of it, on the conditions that they be replaced with something compatible with neighboring historic buildings and that whatever is built where the Sears building is now be set back from the East End Arts Council, which is next door. READ

04/07/16 12:00pm
04/07/2016 12:00 PM
Rendering of Preston House rehab and five-story hotel proposed by Joe Petrocelli

Courtesy rendering of Preston House rehab and five-story hotel proposed by Joe Petrocelli

Second Street and parts of Ostrander Avenue could join downtown Main Street on the National Register of Historic Places, under a proposal from the Riverhead Town’s Landmarks Commission. READ

01/26/15 10:00am
01/26/2015 10:00 AM
Local historian Richard Wines (left) along with Doris McGreevey and Richard Radoccia stand in the Jamesport Meeting House, where Mr. Radoccia and Ms. McGreevey hope to present a play about the Civil War on the 150th anniversary of its end. (Credit: Paul Squire)

Local historian Richard Wines (left) along with Doris McGreevey and Richard Radoccia stand in the Jamesport Meeting House, where Mr. Radoccia and Ms. McGreevey hope to present a play about the Civil War on the 150th anniversary of its end. (Credit: Paul Squire)

Richard Radoccia of Laurel said he was stunned to hear little local fanfare was planned to observe the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War.

So the amateur historian is setting out to change that.

Mr. Radoccia and Doris McGreevy of Mattituck plan to produce a play he wrote about the Civil War to commemorate its April anniversary.  (more…)

10/27/14 8:49pm
10/27/2014 8:49 PM
From left, Landmarks Preservation Commission member  Cliff Baldwin, Riverhead Town Councilwoman Jodi Giglio and commission chair Richard Wines listen to speakers at Monday's commission meeting, where a proposal to make a six-mile stretch of Main Road a National Register Historic Place was withdrawn. (Credit: Tim Gannon)

From left, Landmarks Preservation Commission member Cliff Baldwin, Riverhead Town Councilwoman Jodi Giglio and commission chair Richard Wines listen to speakers at Monday’s commission meeting, where a proposal to make a six-mile stretch of Main Road a National Register Historic Place was withdrawn. (Credit: Tim Gannon)

After hearing more comments both for and against a proposed National Register Historic District on Main Road stretching from Aquebogue to Laurel, Riverhead Town’s Landmarks Preservation Commission reluctantly voted to withdraw its application for the district.

The withdrawal, made at the commission’s monthly meeting Monday, kills the proposal in both Riverhead and Southold towns.

But it didn’t come easily.

(more…)

10/22/14 8:00pm
10/22/2014 8:00 PM
A six-mile stretch of Main Road could be listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The corridor includes Aquebogue’s Old Steeple Church, built in 1862 and designed by a farmer with no architectural experience, as well as Aquebogue Cemetery, which dates back to 1755 and contains the graves of numerous Revolutionary War soldiers. (Credit: Andrew Lepre)

A six-mile stretch of Main Road could be listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The corridor includes Aquebogue’s Old Steeple Church, built in 1862 and designed by a farmer with no architectural experience, as well as Aquebogue Cemetery, which dates back to 1755 and contains the graves of numerous Revolutionary War soldiers. (Credit: Andrew Lepre)

Four of the five Riverhead Town Board members have signed a letter asking the town’s Landmarks Preservation Commission and the state Office of Parks and Recreation to withdraw the town’s application for a proposed National Register Historic District along Main Road in Aquebogue, Jamesport and Laurel, according to Councilman George Gabrielsen.  (more…)

09/14/14 10:00am
A six-mile stretch of Main Road could be listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The corridor includes Aquebogue’s Old Steeple Church, built in 1862 and designed by a farmer with no architectural experience, as well as Aquebogue Cemetery, which dates back to 1755 and contains the graves of numerous Revolutionary War soldiers. (Credit: Andrew Lepre)

A six-mile stretch of Main Road could be listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The corridor includes Aquebogue’s Old Steeple Church, built in 1862 and designed by a farmer with no architectural experience, as well as Aquebogue Cemetery, which dates back to 1755 and contains the graves of numerous Revolutionary War soldiers. (Credit: Andrew Lepre)

The Riverhead and Southold landmarks preservation commissions have nominated the six miles of Main Road running through the hamlets of Aquebogue, Jamesport and Laurel to the National Register of Historic Places. This designation will open up access to incentives that might help preserve some of the many historic structures along this stretch of rural highway that serves as the gateway to the North Fork.  (more…)

08/15/14 6:00am
08/15/2014 6:00 AM
John Mangieri (Credit: Rachel Young)

Gian Mangieri, owner of Laurel Creek Landscape Nursery in Laurel, expressing his concerns about a historic designation along Main Road. (Credit: Rachel Young)

The mood was pleasant when a meeting commenced Thursday evening at Jamesport Meeting House to discuss a proposal to create a National Register Historic District on six miles of Main Road stretching from Aquebogue to Laurel.

Residents at the meeting, which included several Riverhead and Southold Town politicians, listened from the building’s historic pews as Richard Wines, chair of Riverhead’s landmarks preservation committee, presented a short slideshow featuring photos of well-known historic properties, like Modern Snack Bar in Aquebogue. He explained that being listed with the National Register provides certain economic incentives, namely a 20 percent tax credit to homeowners doing restoration work on their properties.

Kathleen LaFrank and Jennifer Betsworth of the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation gave an overview of the Register, which was founded in 1966 and is the official list of historic properties that have been recognized as significant in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering or culture.

After the presentations were given, the floor was opened for questions.

And that’s when Gian Mangieri of Laurel stood up.

(more…)