05/22/14 10:53am
05/22/2014 10:53 AM
A barbecue festival is headed for Riverhead in August. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder, file)

A barbecue competition is headed for Riverhead in August. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder, file)

Think you have what it takes to be crowned the best barbecuer in Riverhead? This summer, locals will have a chance to find out.  (more…)

05/10/13 6:15pm
05/10/2013 6:15 PM
JOHN FINNEGAN COURTESY PHOTO | A proposed Riverfront zip line in downtown Riverhead is receiving backlash from the business community.

JOHN FINNEGAN COURTESY PHOTO | A proposed Riverfront zip line in downtown Riverhead is receiving backlash from the business community.

A Westchester man with hopes of bringing a 900-foot-long zip line to the Peconic waterfront in downtown Riverhead plans to address the Town Board at its work session Thursday. He aims to prove that his proposed ride is the type of attraction that will help bring foot traffic to downtown businesses.

But those same business owners he says he hopes to help say they’ll be right there waiting for him Thursday morning, prepared to argue that a downtown Riverhead zip line is something they don’t want.

“I don’t think for a minute you could ride a zip line with boats and fishermen underneath,” said downtown Riverhead Business Improvement District president Ray Pickersgill. “What are they going to do, close off the waterfront?”

Urban Jungle Zip Lines principal John Finnegan says he’s been in talks with Councilman George Gabrielsen for more than a year about his plans to erect a 70-foot tower with a zip line carrying riders over the river to a slightly shorter tower 900 feet away. The draft proposal suggests constructing the towers in the downtown parking lot that runs south of East Main Street.

Mr. Finnegan, who according to state records formed his company just six months ago, said he agreed to pay the town roughly $40,000 this year for use of its land during a meeting between himself, Mr. Gabrielsen and other town employees earlier this week. That payment would increase anywhere from 10 or 15 percent if the town decided to extend the lease next year, Mr. Gabrielsen said.

The Riverhead location, which was first reported earlier this week by riverheadlocal.com, would be the first zip line venture for Mr. Finnegan, who has previously worked as a salesman for a sports publication. The site is one of three currently being considered by Urban Jungle, the North Salem resident said. He’s been in discussions with officials in Westchester to build a ride there and has named Bryant Park in New York City as a possible site.

He said Friday he’s closest to bringing a zip line to Riverhead, where he hopes to open the ride June 28, though he has yet to file a formal application with the town. The zip line would run seven days, from noon to 10 p.m. during the peak summer months, April through October, he said.

A business plan Mr. Finnegan posted online shows that he has been seeking investors to cover 80 percent of the shares in his business, amounting to $500,000. In order for the company to break even on its investment, his business plan states that it would need to attract more than 100 riders per day, per year. The plan states that customers would pay $20 to ride the zip line and would have the option to purchase a photo for an additional $20.

Though his plan suggests advertisements would be papered on the towers, he said advertisements are not being considered at the Riverhead site.

Mr. Gabrielsen, a proponent of the project, estimates the zip line could attract more than 100 riders each weekday and up to 200 riders during weekend days.

“It’s a great idea, it’s a family event,” Mr. Gabrielsen said. “We need foot traffic and this will help facilitate that.”

But Mr. Pickersgill, who owns Robert James Salon & Spa on Main Street, said he believes construction would severely impact parking in the downtown area.

He and other business owners fear customers will be deterred from shopping locally if inconvenienced by insufficient parking, he said.

“Riverhead doesn’t need a zip line,” Mr. Pickersgill said. “It needs a parking garage.”

Further complicating the matter, the Riverhead Parking District shares ownership of the proposed site with the town.

“We pay special taxes to have rights over that property,” Mr. Pickersgill said. “We will take [the town] to court if need be.”

He said he and other business owners plan to protest the proposal when it’s brought up at Thursday’s work session.

But Mr. Finnegan, who spent his childhood summering in Jamesport, said he believes Riverhead is an ideal location for the project because of the downtown’s recent revitalization.

“I think we can help each other,” said Mr. Finnegan, who estimates the business will add 20 to 25 seasonal jobs to the local economy. “Without a question this is realistic. The town already does a great job of bringing in people to the waterfront and when word gets out about us, we will bring in more tourism.”

Thursday’s work session is scheduled for 10:30 a.m. at Riverhead Town Hall. Before construction on the zip line can begin, the site plan needs to be approved by both the Town Board and the New York State Department of Labor, Mr. Gabrielsen said.

cmurray@timesreview.com

04/25/13 3:05pm
04/25/2013 3:05 PM
BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Runners trek doen the unnamed road in Riverhead that could soon share a name with either Heidi Behr or James Bissett.

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Runners trek doen the unnamed road in Riverhead that could soon share a name with both Heidi Behr and James Bissett.

Councilman John Dunleavy says he has a Solomon-like solution to the debate over whether to name the riverfront drive in downtown Riverhead after Heidi Behr or Jim Bissett.

Do both.

There has been a movement recently to name the road leading along the Peconic River after Heidi Behr, the 23-year-old emergency medical technician from Riverhead who died in a May 2005 accident while she was volunteering with the Riverhead Volunteer Ambulance. That proposal calls for naming the road that runs perpendicular to the river from Peconic Avenue to McDermott Avenue after Ms. Behr.

[Previous Coverage: Will downtown road be named for Bissett or Behr?]

But the Riverhead Business Improvement District management association and the Parking District advisory committee had both previously voted for resolutions calling for the riverfront road to be named after Jim Bissett, the late co-founder of the Long Island Aquarium and Hyatt Hotel in downtown Riverhead.

Mr. Dunleavy, who could not be reached for comment in an article about this subject on Wednesday, said in an interview on Thursday morning that he has proposed naming only the unnamed road that runs in between the Subway store and the Salvation Army and goes west to McDermott Avenue after Ms. Bissett. That road, which is an entrance to the town’s parking lot by the Peconic River, also runs adjacent to the aquarium property.

The councilman said the section of the riverfront drive from McDermott Avenue west to Peconic Avenue can still be named after Ms. Behr, and then both would have a portion of the roadway named after them.

“There’s no controversy,” he said.

Supervisor Sean Walter said the Town Board will likely discuss the issue at its work session next week.

tgannon@timesreview.com

07/31/11 1:57pm
07/31/2011 1:57 PM

Hundreds of people gathered along the Peconic River Saturday as kids ages 10 to 18 belted out tunes during Riverhead’s Rocking on the River 2011.

The event, sponsored by the Riverhead Business Improvement District, the Riverhead Chamber of Commerce and the Long Island Aquarium and Exhibition Center, was organized by Music Idol Entertainment.

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JOHN NEELY PHOTO | Samantha Scalfani sang "Mercy."

06/26/11 4:28pm
06/26/2011 4:28 PM

Thousands of people came to the banks of the Peconic River Sunday to see if boats made of cardboard and duct tape could, in fact, float during the second annual Riverhead Cardboard Boat Race. The answer: they absolutely can.

The afternoon started with a hula hoop competition followed by five cardboard boat races. The second annual event was organized by the Riverhead Business Improvement District.

Check back tomorrow for full story and video.

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The results of the race are listed below:

Supervisors race

Riverhead Supervisor Sean Walter vs Southampton Aupervisor Anna Throne Holst
Winner – Sean Walter

Youth regatta (12 and under)  – first heat

1st place: Wave Rage  – Greg Rosasco and Hayden Grill
2nd: Crayola Kids – Katelyn Zaneski and Emily Densieski
3rd: The Schwartzinator – C.J. Tyson, Shannon Hewlett, Sydney Sheren, Adam Sheren, Robert Kelly, Frankie Cooper

Youth regatta (12 and under)  – second heat

1st place: Archimedes – Ian and Jay Oxman and Johah Holderer
2nd place: NO – Kurt Sinclair, Michael Cavedal
3rd place: Time Cutter – Daniel Alhadeff, Dominic Osojonak

Yacht Club Regatta – Single Occupant

1st place: U.S.S. Riverhead News Review – Joseph Tumminello
2nd place: Little Gull – Linda J. Nemeth
3rd place: Castaway – Ed Langdon

Peconic River Pontoon Boats

1st place: Bottom of the Barrel – Captain Erik Bilca, Dave Smith, Jeremy Tocher, Josh, Patrick Clemente, Chris Scarduzio, Andrew McCarthy, and Mark Schumacher
2nd place: Victoria’s real Secret – Jim Kleven and Ben Cotteletta
3rd place: Team Chaos – Kara Cush, Ashley Dethlefsen

Grand National Regatta

1st place: Black Mamba – Kevin J. Tuthill, Rob T. Mullen, Ryan M. Barker
2nd place: USS Monitor -  Sal, Christian and Sal Calvagna
3d place: Big Red – Jack Tyniec, Olivie Tyniec, Ryan Tyniec

Vogue Award: Don Johnson – Jeff Amdrade and Dan Baione
Most Creative: Dragon Fly – Darrell Harris, Aidan Powell, Ryan Powell
Best Costumed Crew: Jailbreak – Nick McKenna, Blake McKenna and Charlie Siscaretti
Spirit Award : SS Minnow – Capt. Nora Catlin, Jeff, Mark Sisson, John and Katrina Lovett, Ed, Laura Hunsberger
Titanic Award: SS last minute  – Ed Wormold and Reggie Bowman
Ugliest Boat: Yellow Submarine -  Aly Aylard, Merlhy Gutierezz, Christine Hollander and Nancy Chirello
Commanders Choice: USS Monitor – Sal, Christian, and Sal Calvagna
Best Captain: Peconic Pearl – Matthew and Brody Moorman
Worst Captain: The Barge – Pete King, Dave Camarata, Nick Camarata
Best Themed Award: Team Chaos  – Kara Cush, Ashley Dethlefsen

VERA CHINESE PHOTO | One of the entrants in the 2011 Riverhead Cardboard Boat Race.

04/28/11 6:46am
04/28/2011 6:46 AM

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Riverhead BID president Ray Pickersgill downtown by the public bathrooms waiting for the security camera demonstration last Thursday afternoon.

The Riverhead Business Improvement District got a sneak peek at how a downtown surveillance camera would work last Thursday.

Representatives from Next Level Vision and Sound of Holbrook installed a camera on one of the streetlight poles by the river to demonstrate the quality of the video feed to BID members.

The BID plans to mount a small antenna on top of the comfort station behind the former Sweezy’s building, where the equipment would be kept. The BID is hoping to have video cameras monitoring activity from McDermott Avenue all the way to Grangebel Park. The camera system they seek would retain videos for up to 30 days, according to BID president Ray Pickersgill. The BID plans to seek competitive bids on the camera system, and is hoping to get the system for between $30,000 and $40,000.

Mr. Pickersgill said that when the group sought surveillance cameras about a year ago, prices were in the $70,000 range.

tgannon@timesreview.com

04/14/11 1:30pm
04/14/2011 1:30 PM

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Construction workers eating an early lunch at Riverhead Diner and Grill Thursday morning have a view of the graffiti on the former West Marine building.

Local officials are considering a couple of options in the war against graffiti.

The Riverhead Business Improvement District is looking into several products that can remove graffiti from buildings if applied fairly soon after the markings are made, said BID board member Tony Coates.

And the Town Board said the American Red Cross’ Community Service Program will remove or cover graffiti free of charge, as long as the property owner signs an agreement releasing the Red Cross from liability,

The BID program would apply only to properties within the BID, a taxing district in downtown Riverhead. But the Red Cross program could be applied townwide, according to Supervisor Sean Walter.

“They will supply the paint or use paint supplied to them,” Mr. Walter said at last Thursday’s Town Board work session.

Mr. Coates said in an interview that the BID was considering several products that can remove graffiti if it’s caught quickly, and hasn’t decided which one to go with.

Graffiti that’s been in place a long time and has settled probably can’t be removed with these products, and would have to be either painted over or blasted off.

“If the graffiti was done recently, we’ve found processes where you spray it and it will immediately remove it,” Mr. Coates said. “We’re still researching which is the best product.”

He said that “sometimes when people try to touch up graffiti, it will look just as bad as the graffiti. They pick a paint that doesn’t match and it looks just as blighted.”

Officials have noticed an increase in graffiti in town; some graffiti tags and some gang related.

“I don’t believe a lot of it is gang related,” Police Chief David Hegermiller told the Town Board last Thursday. He said it’s mostly people emulating gang graffiti and graffiti “taggers.”

“The biggest thing with gang-related graffiti is to remove it within 24 hours,” Councilwoman Jodi Giglio said.

The town code actually requires the owners of property defaced by graffiti to remove it within 14 days of being notified to remove it, or risk a fine of as much as $250.

Mr. Coates said that in cases where property owners have been notified but not responded, the BID can have graffiti removed at the owner’s expense.

Chief Hegermiller said there are already some security cameras downtown, and the BID hopes to mount one on a pole near the former Swezey’s parking lot.

“I look forward to there being no graffiti at all,” Mr. Walter said.

Councilman George Gabrielsen suggested the town designate a “graffiti wall” where graffiti artists can “show off their art,” although he acknowledged, “with gangs, it wouldn’t help.”

tgannon@timesreview.com