07/15/14 10:51am
07/15/2014 10:51 AM
Orient State Park

Orient State Park

Sponsored By Glenwood Village.

An Active Adult Community for Eastern Long Island.

The North Fork is home to more than just beautiful beaches. Summer brings many activities to the area and this season Glenwood Village has put together a list of recommended ideas that those over 50 can enjoy during a weekend visit.

Start off your weekend on the North Fork by enjoying a cup of coffee while watching the sun rise over Gardiners Bay. You can even bring some fishing gear and have a chance at catching some striped bass and flounder.

Gardiners Bay - Bug Lighthouse

Gardiners Bay – Bug Lighthouse

Once the sun has risen, spend the afternoon walking the beaches of Orient. After that, take a trip to the old whaling port in nearby Greenport. The whaling ports were once home to over two dozen large whaling vessels, which made over hundreds of voyages between the 1790s and the Civil War. See this historic piece of the North Fork while enjoying the beautiful harbors and outdoor summer weather.

North Ferry to Shelter Island

North Ferry to Shelter Island

Continue your day by spending an afternoon on Shelter Island — easy access to the Island is provided by the North Ferry Co. in Greenport. Once on Shelter Island, head to Picozzi’s Service Station and rent a bicycle. Tour the Island with your bike while getting some great exercise.

Corey Creek Vines

Corey Creek Vines

End your day back on the North Fork, first by visiting the Corey Creek winery in Southold and sampling some North Fork wines.

Finish the weekend by taking a trip to Riverhead. Visit the Atlantis Marine World and catch a glimpse of what is under the sea that surrounds you. Special attractions and exhibits are available ,such as taking a seat in the trainer’s chair and working with sea lions and seals.

Long Island Aquarium

Long Island Aquarium

After you visit the underwater life, catch some great deals on your favorite apparel at Tanger Outlet Center in Riverhead. Once you work up an appetite shopping, grab some dessert at Turkuaz Grill downtown and fill up on homemade rice pudding or an ice cream sundae.

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These activities are sure to fill your weekend on the North Fork with fun and enjoyable experiences. You will feel like a North Fork pro once you take part in these activities on your visit to this wonderful summer area.

03/18/14 4:20pm
03/18/2014 4:20 PM
Eastern bluebirds were near extinction in the 1970s. The population on Shelter Island has increased by over 300 percent in the past 12 years. (Credit: courtesy)

Eastern bluebirds were near extinction in the 1970s. The population on Shelter Island has increased by over 300 percent in the past 12 years. (Credit: courtesy)

The Eastern Bluebird Conservation Program at Mashomack Preserve on Shelter Island is looking for volunteers interested in taking part in weekly trips to the preserve to record the nesting progress of eastern bluebirds, whose species population has been recovering from near extinction in the 1970s.  (more…)

12/16/13 11:04am
12/16/2013 11:04 AM

REPORTER FILE PHOTO

A Riverhead man was allegedly caught with drugs on Shelter Island earlier this month and is now facing a possession charge, though the type of drugs was not specified in a Shelter Island police statement.

Michael Lafreniere, 26, was arrested about 8:30 p.m. Dec. 6, following a Shelter Island police investigation, according to the statement.

He was charged with criminal possession of a controlled substance, a misdemeanor, police said. He was released on $500 cash bail and issued a future date in Shelter Island Justice Court.

11/18/13 9:00am
11/18/2013 9:00 AM

JIM COLLIGAN PHOTO | Two members of the New York State Mammal and Sea Turtle Rescue program examining a dead leatherback sea turtle at Miss Annie’s Creek in Mashomack.

A dead leatherback sea turtle washed up on a beach at Miss Annie’s Creek in the Mashomack Preserve on Shelter Island over the weekend.

Spotted by paddle boarder Richard Ruscica and hikers along the Green Trail on Saturday afternoon, Preserve Director Mike Laspia was contacted.

Mr. Laspia secured the turtle by rope to prevent it from washing back into the creek and contacted the New York State Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Rescue program at the Riverhead Foundation in Riverhead. An animal autopsy is scheduled for today to pinpoint the cause of death.

Leatherbacks are the largest turtles in the world, measuring up to seven feet and weighing up to 1,500 pounds. They can be found in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. Although they feed in cool waters, they breed and lay eggs in the tropics.

Their primary diet consists of jellyfish, but almost a third of all leatherbacks have evidence of plastic bags in their stomachs and intestines.

10/19/13 10:00am
10/19/2013 10:00 AM

Has anyone ever told you that you “just have to learn to say no”?

Do you feel guilty when you have to choose between participating in two benefits on the same day and wish that there were two of you so you could? Do you see the same people working at almost every charity event? When asked to help, and you really want to beg off, does “yes” or “sure” inexplicably come out of your mouth instead?

Tom Hashagen

If you have answered yes to any of the above questions, I’m afraid to tell you that you have a serious disease — yes, you are a professional volunteer. While that may seem to be a contradiction in terms, volunteers who exhibit the described symptoms have gone to the next level, and there doesn’t seem to be a cure.

By definition, a professional is someone who gets paid regularly for a service rendered. One could argue that most volunteers are “semi-pros,” in the same way that most semi-pro athletes play a sport but must supplement their income with day jobs. But the only payment volunteers get is satisfaction for a job well done, and most of them log enough annual hours to count as a part-time job at the very least, so professional volunteers it is. True, many professional volunteers are retirees, but seeing as simply maintaining the house and yard and keeping the deer out is a full time job anyway, the rating stands.

When helpmate informed me that somehow I had been left off the kitchen crew list for an event raising money for a great local cause, my throat started to close up as I ran for the phone to rectify the error.

“No!” she said, “It’s all right. They said to just show up.”

I relaxed, a little. But you know what? I didn’t show up.

Here’s what happened. Early afternoon on Sunday we decided to explore a few wineries, keeping to Route 25 so as to avoid that vortex of agritainment, Sound Avenue. We wound up at McCall’s, where it had been suggested we go to try some really good reds. In conversation with our server, we discovered that we were mutually acquainted with Tom Schaudel, a famous Long Island chef, and learned that he was busy helping at a benefit in Cutchogue.

Turns out the benefit was for another chef, Gerry Hayden of the North Fork Table and Inn, who has been diagnosed with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s disease. He gets around with help nowadays, but his eyes, nose and taste buds are as good as ever.

I start twitching. On we go toward the ferry, and helpmate spies yet another chef friend chatting with someone in a west-bound parked car. “Hey,” she exclaims, “isn’t that Mike Meehan?” Yes, the same Mike Meehan of H20 in Smithtown. “He’s got to be here for that benefit,” I say, as I start to sweat.

We had already decided to stop at the famous lunch truck at the North Fork Table, and as I’m waiting for my hot dog with “all three” toppings, I see co-owner Mike Mraz and get the details. “You need to go,” helpmate says, matter-of-factly. A quick phone call to Shaudel and I’m committed. Home, I change in to my chef togs and back on the ferry I go.

Arriving at Eight Hands Farm in Cutchogue only forty-five minutes before hors d’oeuvre, I felt a little like an interloper, but that feeling evaporated as I was immediately put to work by Shaudel spooning black coconut rice into small tasting spoons, soon to be topped with a seared scallop, pumpkin relish and a delicious sauce, the ingredients of which I am not at liberty to divulge. That dish finished, I’m off to help wherever I can. I am drawn to a cutting board where a slender log of puff pastry filled with braised lamb and figs is being bias-cut for a platter. Across the tent someone is shucking Race Rock oysters. There’s duck breast being seared in a rondeau out back, next to a huge pot of simmering sauerkraut. The aroma is intoxicating.

The fire-power at this event is staggering. Restaurants and purveyors like Mirabelle, Nick and Tony’s, H20, Alure, Jewel, the Square at Greenport, Blue Canoe, Catapano’s, McCalls, Browders Birds, Blue Duck Bakery, the Riverhead Project, Town Line Barbecue and the Art of Eating have sent their chefs or representatives to be counted as helping one of their own. I spend the night moving sheetpans of duck, local kielbasa and tomato-crusted striped bass, platters of roasted beets and red cabbage, bowls of braised kale and crispy fingerling potatoes.

The crowd of 200 or better barely has room for Claudia Fleming’s Apple-Raspberry Crostada, as Gerry eloquently thanks his guests and comrades-in-food for an unforgettable evening.

Great people, great food, great cause.

At a recent “old-timers” softball game, I saw plenty of the familiar faces at the grill and doing whatever else needed to be done to help raise money for the Shelter Island Boosters. It was especially good to see two or three of the next generation of volunteers coming up, but we could use a few more. I mentioned earlier that a lot of our local volunteers are retirees and they do a tremendous work, but they won’t be around forever.

Do you have what it takes to be a volunteer, even a semi-professional one? There’s plenty of work to go around!

Mr. Hashagen, who teaches culinary arts at Eastern Suffolk BOCES in Riverhead, writes a monthly column for the Shelter Island Reporter.

01/30/13 10:40am
01/30/2013 10:40 AM

A West Islip man was arrested on Shelter Island Tuesday morning on an active bench warrant from Riverhead Town court, police said.

Sean Cronin, 26, was arrested on North Cartwright Road, according to a Shelter Island police report.

Mr. Cronin was wanted on a bench warrant for a petit larceny charge. Mr. Cronin is suspected of stealing from Target on Route 58 last November, court officials said.

He was turned over to Riverhead police and arraigned in Riverhead Justice court. Mr. Cronin posted bail and is due in court in two weeks, according to the courts.

Shelter-Island-Police-car

01/28/13 5:44pm
01/28/2013 5:44 PM

A Flanders man was arrested for drunken driving on Shelter Island Saturday night and was held until he could be picked up by immigration officials, Shelter Island police said.

Carlos Dominguez, 34, was arrested on Summerfield Place in Shelter Island Heights about 9 p.m., according to a police report. After an investigation, he was found to be intoxicated and charged with driving while intoxicated, police said.

He was processed and held to be processed by immigration authorities, police said.

12/11/12 2:08pm
12/11/2012 2:08 PM

COURTESY PHOTO | Cliff Clark, No. 301,competing at the highest level in the 1972 Olympic Trials 5000 Meters with Steve Prefontaine, No. 229, Tracy Smith, No. 398, and Gerry Lindgren in the striped shirt.

When I think about cross country or 10K races or anything to do with sports on Shelter Island, my mind always turns toward Clifford Clark.

Back in the ‘60s, when running wasn’t popular, you could always see a young Cliff jogging around the island. I remembered him as a basketball and baseball player in high school and when college came for him, he became a runner.

Back then if you noticed someone walking or running along the street you would always stop and ask if they needed a ride, but today, you know better. Back in the late 60’s I got the bug when I read a book that I think did more for walking and running than any other. Written by Dr. Kenneth Cooper (an M.D. and U.S. Air Force colonel) and published 1968, it and was simply titled “Aerobics.” Dr. Cooper made running sound both fun and simple. His “Bedrock Principle # 1” declares that almost everyone should engage in regular, but moderate aerobic exercise. Cooper wrote: “The overwhelming weight of scientific evidence demonstrates conclusively that abandoning a sedentary lifestyle and following a MODERATE exercise routine will greatly reduce your risk of dying from all causes — and enhances your chance of living a longer, more active life.”

That was enough for me.

So this week, when I met with Cliff Clark, I couldn’t help notice throughout the entire conversation the values that make Cliff who he is. Namely, that it’s important to give back to the sport. Cliff is all about passing on his knowledge to anyone who wants to better themselves. Although a championship runner himself, like everyone, he had his idols. One was Dr. Clark, his college coach from Harding College, and the other, his father. Unfortunately, Dr. Clark, died at an early age, but not before passing on his message to Cliff about helping others. After the doctor’s passing, it was Cliff who took on the role of student coach at Harding College. His other idol, his father, he felt was a master teacher always ready to share his expertise with anyone.

When I mentioned to Cliff my knowledge of Dr. Kenneth Cooper’s work and how he inspired me to run and later walk for over 20 years, Cliff informed me that he knew him. They were both in the Air Force and the doctor actually confided in Clark and asked for his help and thoughts while writing his famous book.

During our conversation, I couldn’t help noticing how uncomfortable Cliff was that he was getting credit without giving credit. But let’s get real; back in 1967 when no one was thinking of running, he started a kids’ running group and a two-mile race. Interestingly, the winner of that first run was Justin Gibbons of Southampton, and 13 years later the first 10K winner was also the same Justin Gibbons. He coached the school team for 18 years starting in 1976 and produced star runners like Janelle Kraus, Alexis Hamblet and Toby Green.

Together with John Strode, and Jack Fath and Cliff put together the first 10K run with all three believing the purpose was to give back to the sport. Even though Cliff is currently out of the limelight of the 10K, the success of this race has put Shelter Island on the map for the last 30 years. For the past seven years this race has been in the capable hands of Mary Ellen Adipietro as director. Although many islanders work the race, Cliff said I must give credit to a few people who are always there to make things better, such as James Eklund, Chuck Kraus and Jackie Tuttle.

Over the last few years things were starting to slow down a bit for Shelter Island runners. New school superintendent Dr. Michael Hynes, a man that believes strongly in lifetime sports and a running program, decided to become proactive. So this past August, Toby Green started and is coaching the Shelter Island running club. At the present time they have 15 kids that are involved three days a week after school on Saturdays.

Stay involved and don’t let this fail because in the long run, this program will build both character and a healthy body in all of us.