10/19/13 10:00am
10/19/2013 10:00 AM

Has anyone ever told you that you “just have to learn to say no”?

Do you feel guilty when you have to choose between participating in two benefits on the same day and wish that there were two of you so you could? Do you see the same people working at almost every charity event? When asked to help, and you really want to beg off, does “yes” or “sure” inexplicably come out of your mouth instead?

Tom Hashagen

If you have answered yes to any of the above questions, I’m afraid to tell you that you have a serious disease — yes, you are a professional volunteer. While that may seem to be a contradiction in terms, volunteers who exhibit the described symptoms have gone to the next level, and there doesn’t seem to be a cure.

By definition, a professional is someone who gets paid regularly for a service rendered. One could argue that most volunteers are “semi-pros,” in the same way that most semi-pro athletes play a sport but must supplement their income with day jobs. But the only payment volunteers get is satisfaction for a job well done, and most of them log enough annual hours to count as a part-time job at the very least, so professional volunteers it is. True, many professional volunteers are retirees, but seeing as simply maintaining the house and yard and keeping the deer out is a full time job anyway, the rating stands.

When helpmate informed me that somehow I had been left off the kitchen crew list for an event raising money for a great local cause, my throat started to close up as I ran for the phone to rectify the error.

“No!” she said, “It’s all right. They said to just show up.”

I relaxed, a little. But you know what? I didn’t show up.

Here’s what happened. Early afternoon on Sunday we decided to explore a few wineries, keeping to Route 25 so as to avoid that vortex of agritainment, Sound Avenue. We wound up at McCall’s, where it had been suggested we go to try some really good reds. In conversation with our server, we discovered that we were mutually acquainted with Tom Schaudel, a famous Long Island chef, and learned that he was busy helping at a benefit in Cutchogue.

Turns out the benefit was for another chef, Gerry Hayden of the North Fork Table and Inn, who has been diagnosed with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s disease. He gets around with help nowadays, but his eyes, nose and taste buds are as good as ever.

I start twitching. On we go toward the ferry, and helpmate spies yet another chef friend chatting with someone in a west-bound parked car. “Hey,” she exclaims, “isn’t that Mike Meehan?” Yes, the same Mike Meehan of H20 in Smithtown. “He’s got to be here for that benefit,” I say, as I start to sweat.

We had already decided to stop at the famous lunch truck at the North Fork Table, and as I’m waiting for my hot dog with “all three” toppings, I see co-owner Mike Mraz and get the details. “You need to go,” helpmate says, matter-of-factly. A quick phone call to Shaudel and I’m committed. Home, I change in to my chef togs and back on the ferry I go.

Arriving at Eight Hands Farm in Cutchogue only forty-five minutes before hors d’oeuvre, I felt a little like an interloper, but that feeling evaporated as I was immediately put to work by Shaudel spooning black coconut rice into small tasting spoons, soon to be topped with a seared scallop, pumpkin relish and a delicious sauce, the ingredients of which I am not at liberty to divulge. That dish finished, I’m off to help wherever I can. I am drawn to a cutting board where a slender log of puff pastry filled with braised lamb and figs is being bias-cut for a platter. Across the tent someone is shucking Race Rock oysters. There’s duck breast being seared in a rondeau out back, next to a huge pot of simmering sauerkraut. The aroma is intoxicating.

The fire-power at this event is staggering. Restaurants and purveyors like Mirabelle, Nick and Tony’s, H20, Alure, Jewel, the Square at Greenport, Blue Canoe, Catapano’s, McCalls, Browders Birds, Blue Duck Bakery, the Riverhead Project, Town Line Barbecue and the Art of Eating have sent their chefs or representatives to be counted as helping one of their own. I spend the night moving sheetpans of duck, local kielbasa and tomato-crusted striped bass, platters of roasted beets and red cabbage, bowls of braised kale and crispy fingerling potatoes.

The crowd of 200 or better barely has room for Claudia Fleming’s Apple-Raspberry Crostada, as Gerry eloquently thanks his guests and comrades-in-food for an unforgettable evening.

Great people, great food, great cause.

At a recent “old-timers” softball game, I saw plenty of the familiar faces at the grill and doing whatever else needed to be done to help raise money for the Shelter Island Boosters. It was especially good to see two or three of the next generation of volunteers coming up, but we could use a few more. I mentioned earlier that a lot of our local volunteers are retirees and they do a tremendous work, but they won’t be around forever.

Do you have what it takes to be a volunteer, even a semi-professional one? There’s plenty of work to go around!

Mr. Hashagen, who teaches culinary arts at Eastern Suffolk BOCES in Riverhead, writes a monthly column for the Shelter Island Reporter.

01/30/13 10:40am
01/30/2013 10:40 AM

A West Islip man was arrested on Shelter Island Tuesday morning on an active bench warrant from Riverhead Town court, police said.

Sean Cronin, 26, was arrested on North Cartwright Road, according to a Shelter Island police report.

Mr. Cronin was wanted on a bench warrant for a petit larceny charge. Mr. Cronin is suspected of stealing from Target on Route 58 last November, court officials said.

He was turned over to Riverhead police and arraigned in Riverhead Justice court. Mr. Cronin posted bail and is due in court in two weeks, according to the courts.

Shelter-Island-Police-car

01/28/13 5:44pm
01/28/2013 5:44 PM

A Flanders man was arrested for drunken driving on Shelter Island Saturday night and was held until he could be picked up by immigration officials, Shelter Island police said.

Carlos Dominguez, 34, was arrested on Summerfield Place in Shelter Island Heights about 9 p.m., according to a police report. After an investigation, he was found to be intoxicated and charged with driving while intoxicated, police said.

He was processed and held to be processed by immigration authorities, police said.

12/11/12 2:08pm
12/11/2012 2:08 PM

COURTESY PHOTO | Cliff Clark, No. 301,competing at the highest level in the 1972 Olympic Trials 5000 Meters with Steve Prefontaine, No. 229, Tracy Smith, No. 398, and Gerry Lindgren in the striped shirt.

When I think about cross country or 10K races or anything to do with sports on Shelter Island, my mind always turns toward Clifford Clark.

Back in the ‘60s, when running wasn’t popular, you could always see a young Cliff jogging around the island. I remembered him as a basketball and baseball player in high school and when college came for him, he became a runner.

Back then if you noticed someone walking or running along the street you would always stop and ask if they needed a ride, but today, you know better. Back in the late 60’s I got the bug when I read a book that I think did more for walking and running than any other. Written by Dr. Kenneth Cooper (an M.D. and U.S. Air Force colonel) and published 1968, it and was simply titled “Aerobics.” Dr. Cooper made running sound both fun and simple. His “Bedrock Principle # 1” declares that almost everyone should engage in regular, but moderate aerobic exercise. Cooper wrote: “The overwhelming weight of scientific evidence demonstrates conclusively that abandoning a sedentary lifestyle and following a MODERATE exercise routine will greatly reduce your risk of dying from all causes — and enhances your chance of living a longer, more active life.”

That was enough for me.

So this week, when I met with Cliff Clark, I couldn’t help notice throughout the entire conversation the values that make Cliff who he is. Namely, that it’s important to give back to the sport. Cliff is all about passing on his knowledge to anyone who wants to better themselves. Although a championship runner himself, like everyone, he had his idols. One was Dr. Clark, his college coach from Harding College, and the other, his father. Unfortunately, Dr. Clark, died at an early age, but not before passing on his message to Cliff about helping others. After the doctor’s passing, it was Cliff who took on the role of student coach at Harding College. His other idol, his father, he felt was a master teacher always ready to share his expertise with anyone.

When I mentioned to Cliff my knowledge of Dr. Kenneth Cooper’s work and how he inspired me to run and later walk for over 20 years, Cliff informed me that he knew him. They were both in the Air Force and the doctor actually confided in Clark and asked for his help and thoughts while writing his famous book.

During our conversation, I couldn’t help noticing how uncomfortable Cliff was that he was getting credit without giving credit. But let’s get real; back in 1967 when no one was thinking of running, he started a kids’ running group and a two-mile race. Interestingly, the winner of that first run was Justin Gibbons of Southampton, and 13 years later the first 10K winner was also the same Justin Gibbons. He coached the school team for 18 years starting in 1976 and produced star runners like Janelle Kraus, Alexis Hamblet and Toby Green.

Together with John Strode, and Jack Fath and Cliff put together the first 10K run with all three believing the purpose was to give back to the sport. Even though Cliff is currently out of the limelight of the 10K, the success of this race has put Shelter Island on the map for the last 30 years. For the past seven years this race has been in the capable hands of Mary Ellen Adipietro as director. Although many islanders work the race, Cliff said I must give credit to a few people who are always there to make things better, such as James Eklund, Chuck Kraus and Jackie Tuttle.

Over the last few years things were starting to slow down a bit for Shelter Island runners. New school superintendent Dr. Michael Hynes, a man that believes strongly in lifetime sports and a running program, decided to become proactive. So this past August, Toby Green started and is coaching the Shelter Island running club. At the present time they have 15 kids that are involved three days a week after school on Saturdays.

Stay involved and don’t let this fail because in the long run, this program will build both character and a healthy body in all of us.

11/11/12 4:00pm
11/11/2012 4:00 PM

PETER BOODY PHOTO
Descendants of Henry H. Preston, a Shelter Island wounded in the Civil War who became the county’s first salaried sheriff in 1903, inspect the newly dedicated monument to him in front of police headquarters after Sunday’s dedication ceremony.

A memorial to Henry H. Preston, a Shelter Islander who was wounded in combat in Civil War, served in many town officers and was elected the first salaried sheriff in Suffolk County in 1903, was dedicated on the green in front of Shelter Island’s police headquarters Sunday afternoon by County Sheriff Vincent F. DeMarco.

The memorial was made from a foundation stone of the old county jail on Griffing Avenue in Riverhead, where Mr. Preston presided. It was torn down years ago. The Sheriff’s Office provided the stone and transported it to the Island to a site that was prepared by inmates from the County Jail.

Preston’s great-great-grandson Arthur Bloom led the family effort to see his ancestor memorialized.

“Like thousands of his fellow soldiers, he was injured during the Civil War and suffered from pain throughout his life,” Mr. DeMarco said. “His service and devotion to his country, in itself, makes him a hero.”

Despite pain and disabilities that resulted from his wound, Preston was appointed Shelter Island’s town constable in 1870. He went on to serve as tax assessor, justice of the peace and town clerk over the course of a career in town service that spanned 29 years from 1870 to 1899.

PB PHOTO | Suffolk County Sherrif Vincent F. DeMarco dedicates a monument in Shelter Island’s Center to his predecessor Henry H. Preston.

In 1903, he became the first salaried sheriff in Suffolk County. Among other achievements, he went on to establish the county’s Probation Department and to serve as a judge of the Court of Sessions.

The ceremony included a color guard from the Sheriff”s Office. Town Supervisor Jim Dougherty offered remarks and Dr. Peter DeSanctis offered the prayer of dedication.

08/10/12 10:00am
08/10/2012 10:00 AM

COURTESY PHOTO | Shelter Island sailor Amanda Clark, background, finished ninth overall in the Women’s 470 competition at the 2012 London Olympics.

After eight days and 11 races through the waters on the south coast of England, the 2012 Olympic competition for Shelter Island’s Amanda Clark and teammate Sarah Lihan came to an end Friday.

A two-time Olympian, Clark finished ninth overall sailing in the Women’s 470 race alongside Lihan. The two did not finish on the podium, but Clark did top her finish from Beijing in 2008 when she was 12th.

In the final race Friday, Clark and Lihan finished last, giving them 20 points for a net total of 98. The top 10 teams competed in Friday’s medal race — the 11th of the competition — where points where doubled. So a 10th place finish equaled 20 points. The standings for each team at the end of a race was equal to the number of points it received. The highest total was dropped and the team with the fewest points tallied together at the end was the winner. A total of 20 team competed in the 470 race.

That honor went to the New Zealand duo of Jo Aleh and Olivia Powrie. They finished with a net total of 35 points and clinched the gold medal with a first-place finish in Friday’s medal race. It was the third race they won of the 11. They were second in three races.

Great Britain won the silver medal and Netherlands won the bronze.

It marked the end of a long journey for Clark and Lihan of Team Go Sail, who qualified for the Olympics on the final day of the 2011 World Championships in Perth.

Prior to this year’s competition, Clark announced that this would be her last Olympic competition. She said she hoped to continue to work with the U.S. Olympic Sailing Team in some capacity to share her knowledge and experience.

joew@timesreview.com

07/16/12 11:00am
07/16/2012 11:00 AM

Despite what most people think, newspaper reporters are not ghouls.

Most of us don’t get a charge out of sad news, like fires, car wrecks, drownings and the like. To many, it’s the worst part of the job.

There’s really no worse night’s sleep for a reporter than the hours before having to cover a morning funeral, especially if a victim or victims’ family has been complaining about coverage — names that were spelled wrong, details not fully provided by police or whomever, etc. — leading up the event.

We do it because our editor told us to. In other words, it’s part of the job.

And things have been busy, so to speak, in the TimesReview Newsgroup’s coverage area over the last few months, especially the weekends.

That’s why this weekend was so welcome. No one was hurt, maimed or worse. We had a few DWI arrests but hope those who were caught end up being all the safer behind the wheel because of it. (There’s a glass-half-full way to look at it.)

The best part of all, business wise — of course, bad news is good for a media group’s bottom lines — is that site traffic was good.

Yep, the websites were humming along all weekend, despite it being beach weather.

For the curiosity seekers, here were our most-read stories that posted Saturday or Sunday, in order:

Shelter Island fireworks called off, twice

Jason Kidd nabbed on DWI in Southampton Town

Video: 1 minute from the all-classes Greenport HS reunion

Guest Spot about on North Fork becoming like the South Fork

3 busted for DWI Saturday night in Riverhead

Arcade store returns to Greenport

Photos from the Mattituck street fair

Seniors feud over financials at Calverton community

It was nice for a change to see people flocking to stories about street fairs, fireworks and high school reunions, as opposed to car crash photos.

• Managing three websites as the lone editor on a weekend can be quite a task, so I’ve mastered the art of scanning press releases to see if they’ll make for potential news items.Or so I thought I mastered the art.

Below is a funny email exchange I had with reporter Paul Squire Sunday afternoon. Squire was referencing a press release he had attached from the Southampton Town Police Department, which I had already “read.”

From Squire: Damn shame this is way outside our coverage area. I think East Hampton Patch had the scoop.
Me: Yeah, drunken Texan flies into the woods. Good [stuff].
Squire: It’s Jason Kidd the basketball player, not just some drunk Texan! :D
Me: OMG!

I had read the email quickly to find out where it happened, and where the victim/suspect was from. But I overlooked the name!

We ended up posting something short on the Kidd crash to riverheadnewsreview.com anyway, even though it happened outside the coverage area. I figured there were enough Knicks fans in Riverhead who would want this news. Plus, it happened in Southampton Town, a chunk of which is in our coverage area. (And I had a nice tid-bit from a source that Kidd had just bought a house in Water Mill.)

I didn’t get any complaints.

Michael White is the editor of the Riverhead News-Review. He can be reached at 298-3200, ext. 152., or mwhite@timesreview.com.

07/13/12 12:59pm
07/13/2012 12:59 PM

KATHARINE SCHROEDER FILE PHOTO | The Mattituck Street Fair is fun for the whole family.

Hey everyone. I’m back from vacation and just in time. There are a lot of great events happening this weekend all over the North Fork. For times, locations and other information about my picks and all the other events happening this weekend, check out events.timesreview.com.

One “must do” event is the Mattituck Street fair. There’s music, craft booths, food and much more. Beat the heat and get there early Saturday morning. Head back to the Love Lane area later in the day to pickup BBQ chicken dinners from the Mattituck Presbyterian Church. You can also call 631-298-4145 and get tickets in advance.

Another one of my favorites is the Long Island Antique Power Authority Tractor Pull and show at Hallockville. This event is fun for the whole family, and kids under 12 can get in for free. You’ll be amazed when you see how much weight these tractors can carry.

Many of you drive by my next pick every day: the Jamesport Carnival. The carnival runs through Saturday and there is a great fireworks display at night to conclude the event. Park on Peconic Bay Boulevard for the best view. My favorite spot is near the marina near the South Jamesport beach.

Tonight on Shelter Island, Shelter Island Reporter editor Peter Boody is discussing his new book, ‘Thomas Jefferson, Rachel & Me.’ For more information, call the Shelter Island Library.

Shelter Island is also having fireworks Saturday night at Crescent Beach. The show begins at dark, and I know you can also see from points in Greenport.

Riverhead & Greenport are having live music events tonight on the Peconic Riverfront and in Mitchell Park. Bring your chairs and blankets and enjoy a relaxing time.

Speaking of music and Mitchell Park, here’s a good way to spend your Monday evening. Head to Greenport for free ballroom dancing lessons, followed by “Monday Night Dances in the Park”. Families, pets and picnics welcome.

For more events, tips and tricks, follow me on Facebook and Twitter. And if you don’t see your event listed on our website, make sure you email me.