01/28/12 10:30am

REPORTER FILE PHOTO | Members of the Shelter Island Deer & Tick Committee with a 4-poster feeding station. Pesticide is applied by rollers on four vertical posts as deer feed on corn contained in buckets between each pair of posts.

After many years of debate, political wrangling and scientific investigation, New York State has joined the rest of the lower 48 in approving for widespread use the permithrin-based pesticide that is applied to the heads and necks of deer as they feed on corn at “4-poster” deer-feeding stations.

The purpose of the device is to kill ticks and reduce the incidence of tick-related illnesses among humans.

The approval limits the pesticide or “tickicide’s” use to Nassau and Suffolk Counties, where Lyme disease and other illnesses associated with tick bites have become endemic. Special permits will still be required to deploy the 4-posters because they violate a state DEC rule that bans the baiting of deer.

The decision is nothing less than momentous to the people — spearheaded largely by Shelter Islanders — who have been lobbying for it for nearly a decade.

It follows a three-year 4-poster test program on Shelter Island and Fire Island conducted by the Cornell Cooperative Extension under a special state permit. Its cost of more than $2 million was funded by the state, county and town as well as private donors. The town continues to deploy 15 4-poster stations under an annual extension of that permit. Local taxpayers pay the $75,000 bill for that. The test program deployed 60 units on Shelter Island.

The three-year test was conducted only after Shelter Island’s Gov. Hugh Carey wrote the sitting governor at the time, George Pataki, to order the DEC as a matter of public health to allow a test to see if 4-posters could lower the tick population. Until then, the DEC in Albany had adamantly opposed the use of 4-posters in New York State even though every other state except Hawaii and Alaksa had no rules against then.

The DEC said that drawing groups of deer to baiting stations might spread chronic wasting disease among the state’s deer herd; it also said that the tickicide deployed by the 4-poster was not registered for use in the state. The state’s hunting lobby bitterly opposed the 4-posters, fearing the tickicide it deployed would taint deer meat.

According to a Cornell report on the test-program that was released last spring, 4-posters were found to be highly effective in killing ticks while introducing no more permethrin into the environment than can be found by testing deer on North Haven, which was used as a control site. There were no 4-posters there and yet trace amounts of permithrin were found in its deer, most likely from the broadcast spraying of private yards and lawns by pest control companies with permithrin-based chemicals.

The DEC’s Vincent Palmer, who oversaw the Shelter Island test program, announced that the state had “registered” the 4-poster tickicide in an email sent to 4-poster stakeholders on Friday.

He reported that the DEC had agreed to register the tickicide on January 9. It was approved “in conjunction with Special Local Need (SLN) Supplemental Labeling that is assigned the following registration number: SLN No. NY-120001. The SLN labeling specifies the restrictions, geographical use limitations, and conditions which must be complied with in order for 4-Poster Tickicide to be legally used in New York State. For example, 4-Poster Tickicide is registered for use only in Nassau and Suffolk counties, and may only be used in conjunction with a valid deer feeding permit issued in accordance with the provisions of 6 NYCRR Part 189.”

He wrote that “details associated with procedures involved with applying for a Part 189 permit authorizing the baiting of deer in connection with the use of 4-Poster Deer Treatment Devices are being developed. The NYSDEC’s Division of Fish, Wildlife and Marine Resources will provide details in the very near future.”

Shelter Islander Janalyn Travis-Messer, a real estate agent who was among those who lobbied for the 4-poster program, called the news “very exciting” in an email reply to Mr. Palmer that was copied to all the stakeholders. Her late husband Jim was a town councilman who suffered from Lyme disease.

01/24/12 5:00pm
01/24/2012 5:00 PM

Real estate photography has changed drastically over the past decade — and not necessarily for the benefit of longtime professional photographers.

Compounding the effects of the housing crisis, the transition from film to digital and the emergence of a new generation of photographers have led to much smaller incomes for established photographers and forced an exodus of veterans from what used to be a lucrative trade.

Local realtors agree that photographs have taken a hugely prominent role in recent years, as buyers view a multitude of photographs on real estate websites like Trulia.com and Zillow.com before agreeing to see a home in person. It’s just easier for anyone with a digital camera to snap some good ones.

Here are a handful of images from real estate photographers still in the business. And to read more, be sure to pick up a copy of this week’s Riverhead News-Review.

 

EDBERG MARKETING

This photo from Peter Berlin shows an aerial shot of a roughly 2,000-square-foot, 4-bedroom home on Shelter Island. The house is no longer on the market.

PETER BERLIN PHOTO

 

EDBERG MARKETING

Another bird’s-eye view of a home in Orient that is currently on the market for $1.4 million. With a water-front view, the home features 4 bedrooms.

PETER BERLIN PHOTO

 

EDBERG MARKETING

This photo of a Cutchogue home provides a glimpse to the water-front view the homeowner can enjoy while showing the spacious property in the front of the home.

PETER BERLIN PHOTO

 

EDBERG MARKETING

A tucked away home on the water, this two-story Cutchogue house is 2,000 square feet.

PETER BERLIN PHOTO

 

HAMPTONS GATEWAY PHOTOGRAPHY

A view from the front of a South Jamesport house.

PAUL DEMPSEY PHOTO

 

HAMPTONS GATEWAY PHOTOGRAPHY

This South Jamesport home features plenty of natural light in the master bedroom as captured by this photograph.

PAUL DEMPSEY PHOTO

 

HAMPTONS GATEWAY PHOTOGRAPHY

A view from the back of a South Jamesport house.

PAUL DEMPSEY PHOTO

12/20/10 10:44am
12/20/2010 10:44 AM

BEVERLEA WALZ PHOTO | The Chequit Inn and Restaurant.

Owners: James and Linda Eklund

Year established: 1994

Location: 23 Grand Ave., Shelter Island Heights

Phone: 631-749-0018

Attire: Casual

Wheelchair accessible: Yes

Hours: Vary with season; call for current hours of operation

Website: shelterislandinns.com

The Chequit Inn was established in 1872 as the meeting and dining hall for Methodist campsites located in Shelter Island Heights. After the turn of the century, the Chequit became privately owned and has been hosting guests ever since.

Guests are welcomed to the Chequit in winter by its brightly lit, comfortable interiors, and in the warmer months, they can enjoy the inn’s patios, which are surrounded by hydrangeas.

According to owners James and Linda Eklund, “There are no surprises at the Chequit Inn, just happy service with good food at a price that will allow you to enjoy yourself with friends and family.”

While the menu varies by season, it always features fresh and local ingredients whenever possible. Sample menu items might include homemade clam chowder, sea scallop brochette, marinated grilled asparagus with herbed goat cheese, roast Long Island duck or crab cakes with a lemon garlic aioli.

And for dessert, diners can choose from options such as the traditional Scottish shortbread or fresh fruit crisp a la mode.

The Dining Guide is not a review column. It appears as a courtesy to Times/Review Newspapers advertisers.

12/11/10 6:48pm
12/11/2010 6:48 PM


GARRET MEADE PHOTO | Kyle Johnson's 12 points helped Shelter Island to a comeback victory in its season-opener against Bishop McGann-Mercy.


Perhaps it was the beginning of a break with the less desirable part of the Shelter Island Indians’ boys basketball history. For a program that has seen its share of losses and struggles, Shelter Island’s entry into the 2010-11 season on Saturday was something the Indians could feel good about.

Not that the first quarter was a feel-good story for Shelter Island. The Indians made only 3 of 12 field-goal attempts and found themselves on the wrong end of a 16-9 score against the Bishop McGann-Mercy Monarchs in Riverhead. Things got worse for Shelter Island before they got better. The trailed by as many as 14 points early in the third quarter.

That is when Shelter Island teams of years past may have folded, but not this season’s squad. Instead, the Indians showed resilience, fought to the end, and earned themselves a 58-54 non-league victory.

How’s that for a way to start a season?

“This was a great start forward for our season,” said Kyle Johnson, one of Shelter Island’s four starting seniors.

Shelter Island took its first lead since 1-0 when John McEnroe made a putback off his own miss for a 45-44 lead with 3 minutes 39 seconds left in the game. McGann-Mercy regained the lead three times after that, but stubborn Shelter Island bounced back each time.

“I was pretty confident that we were going to win for three and a half quarters of the game,” McGann-Mercy guard Pat Stepnoski said. “Then they hit that shot and went up by one. That was a bit of a reality check.”

After Stepnoski sank a pair of free throws to close Shelter Island’s lead to 56-54 with 7.7 seconds left to play, James Read of Shelter Island threw a three-quarter-court inbounds pass to Matt Belt-Cappellino, whose layup with 3.9 seconds to go sealed the result.

“They kept their composure and they didn’t fold, which is huge,” said Shelter Island Coach Michael Mundy.


GARRET MEADE PHOTO | Christian Lynch of Bishop McGann-Mercy went up for a layup.


The loss was a bitter one for the Monarchs, who saw a win slip from their grasp as they suffered their third loss in four games.

“This was a downer today,” McGann-Mercy’s unhappy coach, Mike Clauberg, said following a lengthy postgame meeting with his team. “Shelter Island just outhustled us, outworked us, scored at will on our defense. We just kind of gave up defensively. I give credit to Shelter Island. They worked really hard.”

Johnson scored five of Shelter Island’s final nine points. He finished with 12 points, as did teammate Chris Napolitano. McEnroe added 11 points and Read grabbed 10 rebounds.

Shelter Island persevered despite the fact that two of its players, brothers Aaron Johnson and Kyle Johnson, fouled out in the fourth quarter.

Shooting was a problem for Shelter Island last season when the team went 5-12. The Indians had trouble putting points on the scoreboard. But that may have changed. Following a rough first quarter on Saturday, Shelter Island shot 62 percent from the field. Better shot selection helped.

“We need to practice on the foul shots, though,” said Kyle Johnson, referring to his team’s poor 12-for-31 performance at the free-throw line.

But McGann-Mercy had its issues as well. Rough free-throw shooting (14 of 23) and 32 turnovers were the killers. During one stretch late in the game, McGann-Mercy made only 3 of 8 free throws.

“We had a chance to win the game,” Clauberg said. “We had free throws at the end of the game.”

McGann-Mercy received 19 points and five assists from Joe Crosser. Stepnoski played with a sinus infection and still recorded a double-double with 10 points and 19 rebounds. Justin Vasquez contributed 10 points.

But one of McGann-Mercy’s best rebounders, Danny Hartmann, got into early foul trouble, played sparingly, and fouled out with 40.1 seconds remaining. He ended up with four points and one rebound.

“I was very disappointed in how our kids reacted,” Clauberg said. “We didn’t go with the game plan and did a lot of things lackadaisical today.”

“We weren’t pump faking, guys weren’t coming to the ball,” he continued. “They were turnovers that shouldn’t have happened. It wasn’t like [Shelter Island] created turnovers. I felt like it was more just mistakes on our part.”

bliepa@timesreview.com

12/11/10 6:01pm

The Shelter Island Indians, who trailed by 14 points early in the third quarter, bounced back for a 58-54 season-opening high school boys basketball victory at Bishop McGann-Mercy Diocesan High School on Saturday.

Kyle Johnson scored five of Shelter Island’s final nine points. He finished with 12 points, as did teammate Chris Napolitano. John McEnroe added 11 points and James Read grabbed 10 rebounds.

McGann-Mercy (1-3) received 19 points and five assists from Joe Crosser. Another Monarchs player, Pat Stepnoski, recorded a double-double with 10 points and 19 rebounds. Justin Vasquez contributed 10 points.

Shelter Island took its first lead since 1-0 when McEnroe made a putback off his own miss for a 45-44 lead. McGann-Mercy regained the lead three times after that, but Shelter Island proved too resilient.

After Stepnoski sank a pair of free throws to close Shelter Island’s lead to 56-54 with 7.7 seconds left to play, Read threw a full-court inbounds pass to Matt Belt-Cappellino, whose layup with 3.9 seconds to go sealed the victory.

bliepa@timesreview.com