05/01/13 2:16pm
05/01/2013 2:16 PM

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To the editor:

I met Steve Rosin a decade after Troy Gustavson did, but in the same fashion; he was recommended when I needed an electrician for my home.

We got along famously, our families grew close and he became my best friend. Of course, Steve maintained a posse of best friends, but that in no way diminished our relationship. His capacity for friendship and love seemed unlimited.

[Related: Community rallies for Mattituck man fighting aggressive cancer].

Though he was ravaged by a rare and particularly aggressive cancer, Steve stayed in character till the end. He spent the last month in the oncology ward at Columbia-Presbyterian hospital overlooking the Hudson and you’d be hard-pressed to find a doctor, nurse or janitor on the 6th floor who could not describe with gusto the peculiar mating habits of herring under the George Washington Bridge. They learned from Steve and were inspired by him.

Although Steve’s gone, he’s indelibly in the hearts and minds of all who knew him.

That Steve’s doctors were amazed by how hard and how long he fought to beat his disease isn’t a surprise. This might be:

A few months ago, sitting on his porch between surgeries, he said, out of the blue, “You know, I’ve had a good life. I’ve done a lot. And I wouldn’t do anything differently. There’s nothing I’d change.” I still marvel at his attitude. How many of us exit with no regrets? Perhaps you’ll find comfort in that, as I do.

Troy’s comments about Steve were on the mark, gracious and touching. They meant a lot to me and I sent the column to his wife, sister and parents. Thanks for sharing with your readers.

Larry Simms, South Jamesport