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02/08/17 12:07pm
02/08/2017 12:07 PM

Suffolk farmers

More than a dozen farmers, most from the East End, spoke at a Tuesday public hearing in Hauppauge in support of a proposed Suffolk County law that would sidestep a New York State Supreme Court ruling that deems development on protected farmland illegal.

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01/10/17 6:00am
01/10/2017 6:00 AM

Suffolk County farmland press conference
Jeff Rottkamp, owner of Fox Hollow Farm in Baiting Hollow, had been preparing to join Suffolk County’s farmland preservation program. But those plans changed in September, when a New York State Supreme Court judge deemed development on protected farmland illegal.

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10/07/16 2:24pm
10/07/2016 2:24 PM

Special permits and so-called hardship exceptions, which allowed farmers to develop preserved farmland, have been deemed illegal, according to a New York State Supreme Court ruling. READ

11/20/13 1:00pm
11/20/2013 1:00 PM

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | U-pick operations like this one will soon be allowed on preserved farmland.

The Suffolk County Legislature Tuesday unanimously passed a bill amending the county’s Farmland Preservation Law, which will allow activities promoting tourism to take place on preserved farmland – ensuring such farm operations stay economically viable in the future.

The legislation, proposed by County Executive Steve Bellone, applies to land purchased in part or in whole by Suffolk County for the purpose of farmland development.

Once signed by Mr. Bellone, activities promoting agricultural tourism including U-pick operations, harvestable crop mazes and hayrides would become acceptable, as well as the addition of larger farm stands, permeable parking areas, and processing facilities that create locally crafted goods such as wine or potato chips.

The new regulations will also allow educational tours to teach visitors about agricultural production and environmental sustainability, according to the bill.

“These updates to the County’s Farmland Development Rights program will ensure that current and future generations of Suffolk County farmers will have the economic tools necessary to succeed on Long Island,” Mr. Bellone said. “Our agricultural industry not only drives our local economy but it sustains healthy communities with fresh local foods and preserves our overall quality of living.”

The amended code also calls for committee members to prioritize parcels of land being considered for purchase every six months, rather than once a year – to be drawn up in a comprehensive master list submitted to the County Legislature, according to the bill.

Group for the East End President Bob DeLuca said last month that while supporting farmers who operate on preserved land should indeed be on the county’s priority list after investing in the land, doing so should be done carefully.

“The primary purpose of the underlying investment was for agricultural production, so it’s important that farming not drift too far into entertainment,” Mr. DeLuca said.

“But obviously the underpinning of the financial investment is to protect farmland,” he said. “They don’t want to undercut the core of their investment, which is agricultural land for agricultural production. That requires some delicate balancing and regular scrutiny.”

07/30/13 10:55am
07/30/2013 10:55 AM

CYNDI MURRAY PHOTO | Legislator Al Krupski has a new proposal to protect farmland, such as this hayfield in Mattituck.

Conceding that he doesn’t have the votes, Legislator Al Krupski (D-Cutchogue) is withdrawing his bill that would have given farmland preservation and open space purchases an equal share of dwindling county funding.

The lawmaker will instead offer a new bill to streamline the approval process and require properties considered for preservation meet a certain rating threshold.

“It doesn’t make sense to get an appraisal on all these parcels if you have only $2.5 million to spend and 20 parcels on the list,” Mr. Krupski said. “With limited money, we want to acquired the highest quality open space and the highest quality farmland. Why appraise them all, especially if the ratings aren’t high?”

The county currently appraises each property suggested for preservation, regardless of its environmental value. The new Krupski measure would require open space parcels reach a minimum rating of 45 out of a possible 100. Farmland, which follows a different rating system, must obtain at least 11.25 out of 25.

If another municipality shares the cost, the parcel would receive a higher score.

While disappointed the original draft didn’t gain the 10 votes needed, Mr. Krupski said he’s optimistic the amended version will pass in the 18-member legislature.

“I think I have support for this,” he said. “There is a realization that we should be preserving the best and highest quality. With money being so short it’s important to start now.”

The lawmaker said he has yet to come to an agreement on his new proposal with Long Island Pine Barrens director Richard Amper, the most outspoken critic of his original bill.

Mr. Krupski said he would introduce the amendment during the legislature’s Tuesday meeting in Hauppauge.