07/06/15 9:00am
07/06/2015 9:00 AM
CommGarden1

Six-year-old Summer Realander loves coming to the River and Roots Community Garden with her mother, Kristen. (Credit: Chris Lisinski)

“Mom! Mom! I love this garden!”

That’s what six-year-old Summer Realander shouts to her mother, Kristen Realander, across the River and Roots Community Garden on a sunny Wednesday morning. (more…)

07/05/15 2:00pm
07/05/2015 2:00 PM
Gregory Garrett, executive vice president and administarator of health services for Peconic Landing. (Credit: Peconic Landing)

Gregory Garrett, executive vice president and administarator of health services for Peconic Landing. (Credit: Peconic Landing)

Big things are in the pipeline at Peconic Landing.

Next May, the Greenport retirement community will open two new specialized treatment centers: a 16-suite “memory care unit” for residents suffering from dementia and Alzheimer’s and a 16-suite short-term rehabilitation center. The additions are part of a $44 million construction project the facility began last year.

“We’ve broken ground and are framing the building now,” said Gregory Garrett, Peconic Landing’s executive vice president and administrator of health services. “We’re really moving along now.”

Mr. Garrett, a central New York native who lives in Mattituck with his wife, Maria, and their kids, Michael, 9, and Kaitlyn, 7, joined the Peconic Landing team nine years ago. He is currently responsible for all aspects of Peconic Landing’s health services: the nursing home, enriched living residence, the home care agency and the organization’s physicians’ clinic.

“When I came here for the job interview I said to myself, ‘I have to get this job,’ ” he recalled. “I fell in love with the North Fork.”

Last week, I chatted with Mr. Garrett about his work at Peconic Landing and the facility’s new memory care unit. Here are some excerpts from that conversation.

Q: What do you enjoy most about your job?

A: That’s easy: the people. I grew up in the industry and I find it to be a privilege to serve the residents we serve and to learn from them. What I also love just as much are the amazing team members I get to work with on a daily basis. The type of people I work with is just a caring, wonderful group.

Q: What’s a typical day like for you?

A: The great thing about life at Peconic Landing is that there is no regular day. When you’re serving human beings, things change on a regular basis. I’m fortunate in my position to be able to sit with a resident and spend time with them, help them with any concerns. But at the same time, I have the opportunity to be involved in all other aspects of our community, such as cultural arts, marketing and finance.

Q: How did the idea for the memory care unit come to fruition?

A: About nine years ago, when I came to Peconic Landing, we felt that it was something we could do better. We provide memory support for our residents at all levels of care at this time, but we felt that if we could individualize the care and promote that sense of purpose that we could do a better job for our residents. And not only our residents, but the community. It’s also something that’s really lacking on the East End.

Q: What kind of care will the unit provide?

A: A lot of that is going to depend on the population. The way we look at it, we have to provide individualized care and activities to provide purpose to our residents. That purpose is going to be different for each individual. We’ll use certain technologies that are unobtrusive to help us monitor the residents and see what their daily routine is.

Q: Tell me more about the type of individualized activities residents will be able to take part in.

A: From the moment a person becomes a member of our care center we try to identify who the person is, and who the person was, by working with the family to identify what their profession was, what their interests were. That’s where we can develop a program. So the sky’s the limit in terms of what we’ll provide. For instance, if a gentleman was passionate about washing his car then we’ll provide a bucket, a car, some soap and a hose for washing it on a daily basis. For that moment in time, that resident will have a purpose.

Have a health question or column idea for Rachel Young? Email her at ryoung@timesreview.com.

07/03/15 2:30pm
07/03/2015 2:30 PM
Robert Mince, 66, has his artwork on display in the hallway of the Riverhead Town Senior Center, where he spends a lot of his time during the week. (Credit: Joe Werkmeister)

Robert Mince, 66, has his artwork on display in the hallway of the Riverhead Town Senior Center, where he spends a lot of his time during the week. (Credit: Joe Werkmeister)

As a visitor approaches, the man with graying hair sits at a table, blending in among the dozen or so other senior citizens. He turns his head and introduces himself, politely asking if he can finish his oatmeal. He loves oatmeal.

“A lot of people complain that they don’t like it,” he later comments.

His name is Robert Mince, the son of a famous clarinet player, a man who can sing opera, who plays the piano and spends much of his time painting abstract drawings using bright, vibrant colors.  (more…)

06/30/15 9:16pm
06/30/2015 9:16 PM
Meetinghouse Creek. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch, file)

Meetinghouse Creek. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch, file)

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has announced about 4,000 acres of land in Southampton, Riverhead and Southold towns that were closed last month to shellfishing will reopen Wednesday.

The areas that will reopen at sunrise include shellfish lands in western Shinnecock Bay in Southampton Town, Terry and Meetinghouse creeks in Riverhead Town and James Creek in Southold Town.

The DEC issued the emergency closures in May after detecting high levels of saxitoxin, which can cause paralytic shellfish poisoning. The bodies of water have been closed to shellfishing after dangerous levels of marine biotoxins were found in shellfish and carnivorous gastropods, such as whelks, conchs and moon snails.

For more information on temporary emergency shellfish closures and maps of the affected areas, visit the DEC’s website at http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/7765.html. A recorded message advising harvesters of the status of temporary shellfish closures may also be heard by calling (631) 444-0480.

06/21/15 7:00am
06/21/2015 7:00 AM
Raw milk at Ty Llwyd Farm in Northville costs $6 a half-gallon. (Credit: Jen Nuzzo, file)

Raw milk at Ty Llwyd Farm in Northville costs $6 a half-gallon. (Credit: Jen Nuzzo, file)

Last week, when my coworker posted a picture to Facebook of a bottle of raw milk she had just purchased from Ty Llwyd Farm in Northville, I was intrigued — and a little unnerved.

After all, Louis Pasteur, who discovered the principles of pasteurization in the 19th century, was revered in my elementary school science classes. It was there that I learned how lucky I was that Pasteur had figured out how to prevent dangerous bacteria from contaminating the chocolate milk I loved so much. Why would anyone choose to seemingly go back in time and drink it raw? And is the practice dangerous? (more…)