10/02/14 8:00am
10/02/2014 8:00 AM
One local expert says stink bugs may become more of an annoyance in years to come.  (Dan Gilrein courtesy)

One local expert says stink bugs may become more of an annoyance in years to come. (Dan Gilrein courtesy)

For one thing, they are aptly named.

Residents who casually squash a halyomorpha halys underfoot will be assaulted by a sharp odor coming from the deceased marmorated (marbled) stink bug.

The smelly critters are here, with some people saying their houses are full of them: climbing walls, underfoot (careful) and hanging out in window curtains and drapes. “Everyone’s asking me about stink bugs,” said Wally Ogar of East End Pest Control on Shelter Island. “I’ve got them in my house, too.”

He’s not the only one. Joanne Sherman said she had never seen one until this spring, and there was no trace of them this summer. But just recently they were back. Neighbors, Ms. Sherman said, told her their house is covered with the bugs.

Mr. Ogar said it’s not a new phenomenon, but happens every fall when the bugs, ready to hibernate, make their way into houses.

But Craig Rosenberg of North Shore Exterminating in Southold said stink bugs are relatively new residents of the East End.

Daniel Gilrein, an entomologist with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County, said “there had been low numbers of stink bugs recorded over the last several years,” but that he and his colleagues “have seen more this year than previously.”

Mr. Gilrein added that he had about 15 in his Riverhead house last week.

Stink bugs might smell bad if roughed up, but they don’t bite and won’t hurt pets or do any structural damage. They’re unsightly and can be a nuisance in large numbers, the entomologist said. Stink bugs are not so benign to farms, orchards or gardens, however, feeding on fruits and leaves.

The jury is still out on getting rid of them, according to Mr. Rosenberg, who is cautious about using insecticides in homes without more information. He’s consulted with Mr. Gilrein and other entomologists and is waiting for upcoming seminars that will address a stink bug solution.

Mr. Rosenberg and Mr. Ogar said some insecticides can be put down outside houses near foundation lines, and Mr. Rosenberg has used “fly lights” in attics, which attracts the bugs and then captures them.

They can be vacuumed, Mr. Ogar said, but the bag has to be thrown away immediately. What should you do if you’re sharing quarters with stink bugs?

Mr. Gilrein advised making sure all possible entry points are sealed or screened off, but admitted this could be impossible for older homes.

“Over the next few years the population may be building, so if that’s the case and they become a serious annoyance, you might contact a pest control professional for assistance,” he added.

What shouldn’t you do if you’ve got stink bugs in the house?

“Panic,” Mr. Gilrein said.

 

09/30/14 8:12am
09/30/2014 8:12 AM
Tick committee members meeting in Riverside at its first meeting in July. (Credit: Cyndi Murray)

Tick committee members meeting in Riverside at its first meeting in July. (Credit: Cyndi Murray)

It seems as though the county’s tick committee will get more time to sink their teeth into the tick problem.

After learning at its first meeting in July that it might only have one or two meetings to help develop a plan for Suffolk County to stem the tide of a growing presence of tick-borne illnesses, the county legislature’s Tick Control Advisory Committee may be around for another year, at least.

A resolution was approved on Monday by the county’s Public Works, Transportation and Energy Committee extending its life until Suffolk’s 2016 Annual Vector Control Plan is adopted next fall. It now requires support from the full body after passing the committee unanimously.

“It was only meant to make suggestions early on,” said Deputy Presiding Officer Jay Schneiderman (I-Montuak), the South Fork legislator who co-sponsored the legislation creating the committee. “But now the committee is expanding somewhat to have a little bit more of an ongoing role while a plan is being implemented.”

The tick problem on the East End came to a head over the past year most publicly in the form of a debate over whether or not a $225,000 deer cull was the right move to help trip the deer herd. Leaders said before, during and after the cull — which reported killing just 192 of the county’s 25,000 – 36,000 deer — that a comprehensive approach toward trimming the herd would be key in combating Lyme Disease and the presence of ticks in the county.

Dr. John Rasweiler, a Southold Town resident who is on the committee, said at the committee’s first meeting at the end of July that after hearing what was expected of it, its original set of expectations simply wouldn’t fit with the timeline given.

“I understand the head of vector control is under some pressure to come up with a plan … by mid-September. He has to prepare some sort of report but I think that is asking a lot from the committee,” he said at the time. “I think even for the committee to narrow down to a series of serious recommendations, that is a pretty tight schedule.”

Mr. Rasweiler — a member of Southold’s deer management committee who has submitted opinion pieces to The Suffolk Times on the topic himself — said on Monday afternoon that giving the committee an extension was undoubtedly the right call.

“It’s probably necessary becasue were dealing with some very complex issues, and anybody who thought we were going to have this all wrapped up by this time was dreaming,” he said. “It’s better to do the job properly than in haste.”

By this time next year, the committee could have another set of tasks on its hands, so it could be given another goal or extension. Time will tell, Mr. Schneiderman said.

“The narrow respect which it was formed for — to guide the division to develop a plan — I don’t think they are going to need to do that forever. Maybe another year is enough, and then it can do other things — research better diagnostic tools, research into a cure — whatever that might be — or look at ways to improve public education.”

09/27/14 6:00pm
09/27/2014 6:00 PM

ENT

Dr. Erin McGintee of ENT and Allergy Associates in Aquebogue will give a talk, ‘The Scoop on Seasonal Allergies,’ at Cutchogue New Suffolk Library Tuesday, Oct. 7, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. She will discuss symptoms and management of allergies to common triggers like ragweed and grass pollen, as well as a meat allergy that can be caused by the bite of the Lone Star tick. For information and registration, call 734-6360.

• San Simeon by the Sound’s final Brown Bag Lunch Lecture of the season is set for Wednesday, Oct. 1, from 1-2 p.m. with guest speaker chef John Ross, who will discuss “The Evolution of the North Fork as a Culinary Region.” The cost, including lunch provided by Erik’s, is $25. For tickets, call San Simeon at 477-2110, ext. 252.

• Fall yoga classes with Rosemary are now forming at North Fork Women’s Resource Center, above Capital One Bank in Cutchogue. Gentle yoga meets Tuesdays and Fridays at 9 a.m.; EasyStretch men’s yoga, Thursdays at 9:15 a.m.; and easy chair yoga, Fridays at 10:45 a.m. Call 631-604-0107.

To send Health Beat news, email dfates@timesreview.com, fax to 298-3287, or mail to Times/Review Newspapers, P.O. Box 1500, Mattituck, NY 11952.

Copy deadline: Friday at 5 p.m. to appear the following week.

09/27/14 7:00am

Those of us who work in offices tend to become one with our (sometimes cushy) executive chairs.

And while it doesn’t take a genius to understand that this relationship probably isn’t the best one for our health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reminds us that office workers spend about 65 to 75 percent of their workday sitting. This lack of motion can contribute to obesity, diabetes and heart disease.

Dr. Richard Hall, a chiropractor in Southold, warns that sitting for long periods of time can also create tension in the musculoskeletal system, affecting the natural curves of the bones in the neck and the lower back, contributing to pain.  (more…)

09/26/14 4:00pm
09/26/2014 4:00 PM
Aaron Virgin, VP of Group for the East End; Jim Dreeben, owner of Peconic Paddler; and Riverhead Supervisor Sean Walter down by the Peconic River on Friday morning. (Credit: Carrie Miller)

Aaron Virgin, VP of Group for the East End; Jim Dreeben, owner of Peconic Paddler; and Riverhead Supervisor Sean Walter down by the Peconic River on Friday morning. (Credit: Carrie Miller)

All week long, North Fork natives have been raising a glass to the coastlines they call dear, joining water lovers across the nation for the 26th Annual National Estuaries Week — using social media to spread water quality awareness.

(more…)

09/24/14 8:00am
09/24/2014 8:00 AM
The Suffolk County Soil and Water District celebrated its 50th anniversary with an event last week. (Credit: Carrie Miller)

The Suffolk County Soil and Water District celebrated its 50th anniversary with an event last week. (Credit: Carrie Miller)

Before there was a state Department of Environmental Conservation tasked with protecting local soil and water resources, there was the Suffolk County Soil and Water Conservation District. (more…)