05/27/13 12:10am
05/27/2013 12:10 AM

JOHN NEEELY FILE PHOTO | Calverton National Cemetery will host its annual Memorial Day service at 1 p.m. Monday.

• Riverhead’s annual combined veterans parade begins at the corner of Pulaski Street and Osborn Avenue at 10 a.m. It will proceed down Main Street and return to its starting location for a ceremony at the World War II memorial in front of Pulaski Street School at 11 a.m.

• Calverton National Cemetery , 210 Princeton Blvd. in Calverton, will hold its annual Memorial Day observances at 1 p.m. in the assembly area at the cemetery.

• The official Southold Town Memorial Day parade, hosted this year by the Village of Greenport, will start at 10 a.m. with a ceremony at Veterans Memorial Park at First and Main streets. The parade will then proceed along Main and Front streets and end at the Third Street firehouse.

• Orient Fire Department’s annual Memorial Day parade will start at 7:30 a.m. The parade will step off at the firehouse at 23300 Main Road. The route will run along Tabor Road to Orchard Street, then Navy Street, Village Lane, Main Road and back to the firehouse.

• A Greenport Memorial Day dockside service is scheduled for 8 a.m. Attendees and organizers are asked to meet in the Adams Street parking lot behind the Arcade at 7:45 a.m. Marchers will then head to the dock by the railroad station. Refreshments will follow at the Third Street firehouse.

• Mattituck Fire Department will conduct a wreath-laying ceremony at the war memorial at Pike Street and Wickham Avenue at 8 a.m. That event will be followed by a parade through the Love Lane business area, ending at the firehouse.

12/30/12 11:30am
12/30/2012 11:30 AM

POLICE MUG SHOTS | Teresa Doige, left, and Lillian Kirchberger stand accused of stealing Christmas packages off the front steps of homes in Wading River.

Update

The Southold Town Police Department announced Sunday it has returned packages to 33 alleged victims of the two women arrested earlier this month for stealing Christmas presents delivered to houses across the North Fork. This will likely lead to 33 additional counts of misdemeanor larceny, police said. This investigation is still active and charges are pending.

There are still a number of unclaimed items being held, police said. If you feel you may have been a victim and are missing property please contact Detective Harned at (631) 765-2974.

Dec. 19, 2012

Turns out it wasn’t the Grinch who stole Christmas presents off the front steps of North Fork houses the past few weeks.

Two Mattituck women were arrested Tuesday and charged with the theft of several UPS packages from the front steps of homes in Wading River, Riverhead Town police said.

The suspects are believed to be connected to similar incidents on the North Fork, Southold Town police said. Some of the packages taken were recovered by police, and are waiting for their rightful owners to pick them up.

Police received reports of packages, many of them Christmas gifts, being stolen from in front of houses in the area Friday. One of the thefts was captured on surveillance footage, which was turned over to investigators, Riverhead police said.

Police identified the thieves as Lillian Kirchberger and Teresa Doige, both 42, according to a police report. They were charged with three counts of petit larceny, police said.

Two weeks ago, packages were taken from two separate houses in Aquebogue, according to police reports.

In the first incident on Dec. 5, two women driving a blue station wagon pulled up to an Edgar Avenue home and removed several packages near the house. Three days later on Dec. 8, an unknown person took a package from the front porch of a home on Linda Avenue, police said.

Police said it was not clear if the incidents were related.

“We definitely have them on the three that they’re charged with,” said Riverhead police Det. Sgt. Joseph Loggia.

Southold police Det. Sgt. John Sinning said Southold police had not arrested the women yet, but were investigating about a half-dozen incidents and will make an arrest in the future.

Sgt. Sinning said police recovered some of the stolen Christmas presents from the suspects’ home and vehicle.

“My whole office is filled with Christmas presents,” he said.

Sgt. Sinning asked that North Fork residents who think their presents were stolen contact Southold police.

psquire@timesreview.com

12/28/12 12:00pm
12/28/2012 12:00 PM

East End Arts announced the winners of its third annual Holiday Window Decorating contest in downtown Riverhead at the Dec. 27 Riverhead Town Board meeting.

The windows of several vacant storefronts were decorated in early December and people could vote for their favorites from Dec. 2 to 20 at East End Arts. The first place winner received a prize of $500. Second place got $100, and third place got six free tickets to Long Island Aquarium.

Below are the photos of the three winners from Barbaraellen Koch.

First place went to Peconic Community School.

Second place went to People for the Ethical Treatment of Elves. (Group member Mark Sisson donated the prize to New Beginnings Brendan House, another window contestant).

Third place went to the River and Roots Community Garden.

12/25/12 12:01am
12/25/2012 12:01 AM

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Happy Holidays from the staff at Times/Review Newsgroup.

The Times/Review Newsgroup, publishers of the Riverhead News-Review, The Suffolk Times, the Shelter Island Reporter and the Long Island Wine Press would like to wish you a Merry Christmas today and a Happy New Year.

Pictured in our staff photo are:

Front Row (left to right): publisher Andrew Olsen, sales executive Joseph Tumminello, sales executive Tina Volinski, sales director Sonja Derr, reporter Gianna Volpe, circulation rep Amy Spero, calendar editor Janis Garramone, copy editor Carol Simons, circulation manager Melanie Drozd, reporter Jennifer Gustavson and Suffolk Times editor Tim Kelly.

Middle Row (left to right): sales executive Dave Conroy, News-Review editor Michael White, senior associate editor Lauren Sisson, sports editor Joe Werkmeister, reporter Paul Squire, reporter Tim Gannon, artist Ray Fedynak, business manager Lori Miller, artist Danielle Doll, receptionist Karen Kine, classifieds rep Liz Person, classifieds manager Karen Cullen, display coordinator Candice Schott and copy editor Jill Johnson.

Top Row (left to right): executive editor Grant Parpan, sales executive Erica Brower, art manager Bert Vogel, production manager Eric Hod, sales executive Bill Peters, display coordinator Tracey Doubrava, senior account executive Janice Robinson and sales executive Ken Allan.

12/24/12 1:06pm
12/24/2012 1:06 PM

GIANNA VOLPE PHOTO | Dhonna and Bobby Goodale, center, at Riverhead Kmart where they took a dozen children Christmas shopping Monday.

The diva philanthropist strikes again. Weeks after Dhonna Goodale of Flanders showcased her home’s holiday spirit on a TLC Christmas special, Ms. Goodale and family set out to do what they do best this Christmas Eve: give unto others.

On Monday, Ms. Goodale, her husband Bobby and their two children, visited Kmart in Riverhead to do Christmas shopping for local homeless and foster children in need, a ritual the family has carried out for the past 17 years.

More than a dozen children were present at the Riverhead store Monday to be reminded of the “reason for the season” and each received three school outfits, underwear, outerwear and a couple toys.

The kids also received $5 in cash, which Ms. Goodale instructed them to give to someone else in need.

“If you keep it then that’s on your conscience,” she told the children.

Ms. Goodale said she and her husband don’t exchange Christmas gifts at all.

“This is my Christmas, because I was one of these children,” she said. “For me, this is really, really very special.”

The Goodales were joined at the event by several volunteers, including educators and social workers. Even Mr. and Mrs. Claus and their elves helped with the shopping between 12 and 1:30 p.m.

“I don’t know what each of your situation is,” Ms. Goodale said to the children before they began to comb the aisles. “But I went from welfare to philanthropy and you can grow up and make a difference. Anything you want is obtainable.”

gvolpe@timesreview.com

12/23/12 7:59am
12/23/2012 7:59 AM

KATHARINE SCHROEDER PHOTO | Peconic Bay scallops seviche.

The North Fork is a beautiful peninsula of land surrounded by Peconic Bay, Long Island Sound and the Atlantic Ocean. The wetlands, varying salinity, tides and temperatures have created a seascape unique in the world. And the well-drained sandy soil and long growing season have favored agriculture for centuries. As the crush of population moves east, many of our long-developed resources have dwindled, but their traditions hang on. I have enjoyed being a professional chef on the North Fork for the past 40 years, year in, year out and year round. The foods that keep appearing over and over again are ducks, oysters, scallops, clams, finfish and myriad plant foods — including the wine.

As time moves on into the 21st century we sometimes forget that duck farming was a major industry, with production peaking at six million ducks in 1968 from over 30 producers. Greenport was once the oyster capital of the East Coast, with production peaking at about 25 million pounds of oyster meats in the 1930s. Commercial fishing has changed as aquaculture replaces the dwindling supply of wild fish. And the large crops of wholesale potatoes, cauliflower and cabbage have been gradually replaced by specialty farms that seek to compete in a changed marketplace.

But our cuisine, or the art of cookery using the foods and traditions of our area, has evolved into a distinct art form based on these wonderful ingredients. This Christmas dinner is a celebration of some of these special foods. The recipes are intended to serve eight people.

First Course

Peconic Bay Scallop Seviche

Combine in a bowl the juice of 3 limes and 1 teaspoon lime zest. Toss 1 pound of fresh bay scallops in this mixture and add 1/2 cup diced red onion, 1/4 cup chopped cilantro, 1 tablespoon minced jalapeno pepper, 1 teaspoon minced garlic, 1/2 teaspoon sea salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Cover the bowl with plastic film and refrigerate for 2 to 3 hours before serving.

At service time, remove the flesh from 2 avocados and cut into half-inch cubes. Lightly toss these in a bowl with the juice of 1 lime. Remove the leaves from 1 bunch of fresh watercress. Cut 1 cup of cherry tomatoes in half.

Place watercress in the bottoms of 8 martini glasses. Add the avocado next and place the scallops and tomatoes on top, pouring the sauce over all. Garnish with a little chopped cilantro.

KATHARINE SCHROEDER PHOTO | A cup of oyster stew is ready to serve on a plate covered in hand painted insects.

Soup Course

Oyster Stew

Purchase 1 pint of fresh shucked oysters. Spray a sauté pan with no-stick and cook 1/4 pound of pancetta at medium heat. Remove to a paper towel, chop coarsely and set aside.

Add to the saucepan 1 tablespoon butter, 2 chopped leeks (white part), 2 minced scallions and 1 cup chopped celery. Season with 1 teaspoon Old Bay seasoning, 1 bay leaf, 1 teaspoon sea salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Cook covered at low heat until vegetables are soft, about 5 minutes.

Add 1 tablespoon flour and stir it into the mixture, continuing to cook another 2 minutes. Stir in 2 cups milk and 1 cup heavy cream and bring to a simmer.

Add the pint of oysters with their juices and gradually bring back to a simmer. Add the reserved pancetta and check for seasoning. Remove from the heat and stir in 1 cup crushed pilot crackers. Garnish with pilot crackers and serve.

KATHARINE SCHROEDER PHOTO | Putting the garnishes on the Long Island duck.

Entrée

Brined/Steamed/Roasted Duck

Purchase a fresh 6-pound Long Island duck from a local retailer. Remove the giblets and neck from the cavity and remove the surrounding fat. Trim the wing tips, the tail and the flap of skin near the neck. Save these for another use and rinse the duck under cold water.

Prepare a brine by combining 2 cups orange juice with 2 cups water. Add 1/2 cup coarse salt, 12 bruised peppercorns, 1 bunch fresh thyme, 1 bunch fresh rosemary, 1 tablespoon minced garlic and 1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger. Heat this mixture just enough to dissolve the salt. Add a cup of ice cubes to cool.

Place the duck in a glass or plastic container and pour the brine over it. Refrigerate for 4 to 6 hours.

Make a glaze by adding to a small saucepan 1/2 cup honey, 1/4 cup cider vinegar, 1 tablespoon soy sauce and 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard. Bring this mixture to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes.

Remove the duck from the brine and dry with paper towels. Place it on a V-rack in a roasting pan, breast side up. With a sharp pointed knife, cut a diamond pattern of shallow cuts in the skin. Place in the cavity of the duck 1 quartered orange, 1 bunch of thyme and 1 bunch of rosemary. Tie the legs and wings close to the body with butcher’s twine.

Bring 2 quarts of water to a boil and pour it over the duck, letting the water end up in the bottom of the roasting pan. Cover the roasting pan tightly with foil and place in a 400-degree oven. Cook for 45 minutes and remove the duck from the oven.

Pour off the water and fat and replace the duck in the roasting pan on its rack. Brush the duck all over with the glaze and put it back in the oven, turning down the heat to 375. Let it cook, brushing it with glaze every half-hour, for 1 1/2 hours. If it begins to get too dark, place a loose piece of foil over the breast area. When finished, the duck should be a dark mahogany color and the legs should move easily when squeezed.

Remove duck from the oven and let it rest, covered with foil, for 20 minutes. Cut off the string and remove the herbs and orange from the cavity. Carve the duck at the table or cut it into eighths and partially debone.

Orange Sauce

Purchase 6 navel oranges and squeeze the juice from 4 of them. Remove the zest from 1 orange and set aside. Peel remaining 2 oranges and cut the sections from the membranes.

In a small saucepan, bring to a boil 1/4 cup sugar and 2 tablespoons water. Cook until it begins to caramelize and turns golden. Add the reserved orange juice, 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar, 1/4 cup minced shallots and 1 cup chicken stock. Simmer until reduced by one-third and swirl in 2 tablespoons cold butter. Add back the orange sections and the zest along with 1 tablespoon orange liqueur, such as triple sec or Grand Marnier.

KATHARINE SCHROEDER PHOTO | Raspberry trifle for dessert.

Dessert

Raspberry Trifle

Begin by making a plain pound cake. Cream 1/2 pound butter with 2 cups sugar for 5 minutes, using a paddle and a mixer at medium speed. Beat in 5 large eggs, one at a time.

Place 3 cups flour, 1/2 teaspoon baking powder, 1/2 teaspoon baking soda and 1 teaspoon salt in a bowl and combine with a whisk.

Combine 3/4 cup buttermilk and 1 teaspoon vanilla extract in a small bowl.

Turn the mixer on to slow speed and alternately add the flour mixture and buttermilk mixture, beginning and ending with the dry ingredients.

Spray 2 loaf pans with no-stick and divide the batter between them. Bake in a 350-degree oven for 55 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean. Remove from oven, cool slightly and turn out cakes on a rack to cool. Wrap and refrigerate.

To make the trifle, make a syrup by bringing to a boil 1/2 cup sugar, 1/4 cup water, 1/4 cup lemon juice and 2 tablespoons raspberry liqueur (Chambord, framboise). Remove syrup from heat and let cool.

In a bowl, place 1 cup raspberry jam, 2 tablespoons Chambord and 4 cups fresh raspberries. Combine them gently and set aside.

In a mixer, whip 2 cups heavy cream to stiff peaks and fold in 2 tablespoons confectioner’s sugar.

Slice the chilled pound cake into 3/4-inch-thick slices. Cut the slices in half to make squares. Fill the bottom of a trifle dish with pound cake (some pieces of cake will have to be trimmed) and brush with syrup. Spread the raspberry mixture over this and then a layer of whipped cream. Repeat with two more layers. Garnish the top with 1 cup fresh raspberries and chill for 2 hours.

(The pound cake recipe was adapted from Ina Garten and the trifle was adapted from Martha Stewart.)

John Ross, a chef and author, has been an active part of the North Fork food and wine community for more than 35 years. Email: johncross@optonline.net.

 

12/02/12 5:18pm
12/02/2012 5:18 PM

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Santa waves hello to the crowd during Sunday’s annual Lions Club Christmas Parade.

The annual Riverhead Lions Club Christmas Parade went off without a hitch Sunday afternoon as firefighters, girl scout troops and Santa himself marched down Main Street on the balmy December afternoon.

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Local girl and boy scouts troops marched in the parade Sunday afternoon.

The parade, a decades-old tradition, kicked off at 1 p.m., with the Riverhead Veterans of Foreign Wars, government leaders and the high school marching band leading the march along Main Street.

The Riverhead Fire Department and ambulance corps volunteers followed behind, with Santa and Mrs. Claus at the end of the parade waving to excited children in the crowd.

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | The Riverhead High School marching band played holiday tunes as they made their way down Main Street.

After the parade, Riverhead Town Supervisor Sean Walter handed Mr. and Mrs. Claus the giant “Key to Riverhead,” saying that Santa could now get into houses without chimneys to deliver presents to the good boys and girls in town.

See our photo gallery below for more photos from the parade:

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | 3-year-old Jalice Mitchell talks to Santa for the first time at the annual Riverhead Lions Club Christmas Parade.

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Riverhead veterans lead the annual Santa parade down Main Street Sunday afternoon.

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Dancers with the New York Dance Center in Calverton perform at the Christmas parade Sunday.

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO | Riverhead fire trucks finish up the parade route on the Peconic Riverfront Sunday afternoon.