08/06/17 6:01am
08/06/2017 6:01 AM

When my wife, Vera, first proposed having a yard sale, I gave her a one-word response.

“Ugh.”

The thought of dragging every item that no longer has value to us out of the house so total strangers can walk up and down our driveway confirming my suspicions that they have no value to anyone else either was just plain depressing. READ

08/04/17 5:20am
08/04/2017 5:20 AM

Councilman John Dunleavy’s attempt to circumvent the term-limit law passed last year predictably never gained any traction. When the Town Board approved term limits of 12 consecutive years for council members, it signaled the end of Mr. Dunleavy’s tenure; he was first elected in 2005. READ

07/29/17 5:50am
07/29/2017 5:50 AM

It was quite unlikely for me, a vegetarian for 50 years, to be out shopping the other day for a gun to shoot squirrels.

But squirrels have been stripping our fruit trees. I’ve planted nearly 40 apple, pear, peach and plum trees, and last summer squirrels stripped all of them of their fruit. Squirrels scampered across the property with fruit in their mouths all day long.

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07/28/17 5:55am

The history of voting rights in America is littered with obstacles and roadblocks.

It took until 1870, with the 15th Amendment, for African-American men to earn the right to vote. And even then, literacy tests and poll taxes were designed to suppress their vote. The 19th Amendment, granting voting rights to women, wasn’t adopted until 1920. The 24th Amendment, outlawing poll taxes, was passed in 1964. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 aimed to further solidify those rights for African Americans, nearly a full century after the 15th Amendment granted them.

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