07/28/14 2:33pm

SH_CopsA Calverton woman showed up for her probation meeting carrying drugs, and now faces additional charges, according to Southampton Town Police.

Sheila Amodeo, 41, had reported to the Suffolk County Probation Office at the county center for a scheduled visit when a search — as required due to her probation — turned up three bags of white powder, numerous empty wrappers and a small straw that were in her purse, according to police.

Ms. Amodeo admitted to it being heroin, police said.

She was charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance July 22 on Center Drive South in Riverside.

07/28/14 10:00am
Zachary Studenroth, president of the Cutchogue New Suffolk Historical Council, notes that the settlers in the 1600's were quite a bi shorter than now. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch photo)

Zachary Studenroth, president of the Cutchogue New Suffolk Historical Council, notes that the settlers in the 1600′s were quite a bi shorter than now. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch photo)

As you can walk near the library on Main Road in Cutchogue, it’s easy to overlook the collection of buildings scattered, almost haphazardly, on a gentle hill at the nearby Village Green.

But three structures on the green — the old schoolhouse, the Wickham farmhouse and the “Old House” — are much more historic than they seem, offering a glimpse of centuries of North Fork living. (more…)

07/25/14 4:12pm
BARBARAELLEN KOCH FILE PHOTO | The Peconic River boardwalk that runs along the East Main Street parking lot.

BARBARAELLEN KOCH FILE PHOTO | The Peconic River boardwalk that runs along the East Main Street parking lot.

Looking to meet other businesses? Or are you an entrepreneur looking for someplace to put your profitable idea into action?

Head down by the Peconic River tomorrow for the first ever East End Small Business Expo.

Organized by the East End Small Business Alliance, the new organization’s founder Dave Lotito said last week that the event hopes to “introduce new pedestrians to downtown Riverhead and support businesses already established there.”

Mr. Lotito spoke in front of the Riverhead Town Board last Thursday, an effort for the members to learn more about what the group intends to do before issuing a special events permit — a permit they were OK giving to the group.

The Wading River resident, who said he runs the bar at Cliff’s Rendezvous and has worked at Blackwell’s, Michael Anthony’s and Stonewalls, was clear to the board as well that putting the event on would also showcase his own event services company, One for the Road Event Services.

He also mentioned that he’s “investigating making a substantial investment in downtown Riverhead.”

Saturday’s expo will kick off at noon and last until 10 p.m. and will feature several businesses and live music.

07/25/14 2:00pm

The North Fork Preserve in Northville has been called the county’s “last great park.” (Credit: Tim Gannon file photo)

With plans for Northville’s North Fork Preserve already taking shape, the county Legislature is set to vote Tuesday on the creation of an advisory committee to make recommendations for development and future use of the park.

Because of the park’s 314-acre scale and the number of proposed active uses — which include camping, hiking and horseback riding — the park stands to have “significant” impacts on nearby communities, according to the resolution introduced by Legislator Al Krupski (D-Cutchogue).

The North Fork Preserve Advisory Committee would be made up of 10 members, including representatives from the county and Riverhead Town government, as well as members of local civic group, an environmental group and horseman’s organizations to gather input from the community and make use recommendations, according to Mr. Krupski’s proposal.

In an interview Friday morning, Mr. Krupski said he made the recommendation after hearing from residents neighboring the park, who had voiced concerns about use and infrastructure, including drainage for storm water runoff. Last winter, the county decided to borrow $850,000 to fix drainage problems coming from the property which have plagued an abutting Northville neighborhood for years.

He said Friday that the community is also interested in completing and inventory of natural resources on the parcel “to make sure that everything on the parcel is protected.”

Mr. Krupski said local input is very important, as the “people who live nearby, who are probably are going to use it the most, should have some input as to how it is developed.”

The county purchased of the final three acres of the Preserve in February 2013 with a price tag of $702,000, while the bulk of the property, two parcels totaling 314 acres, were purchased in 2011 for $18.3 million, according to prior News-Review coverage.

Current plans include leaving 133-acres of the northern section undeveloped for uses like hiking or horseback riding, while the southern portion will be used for more active recreation like camping, tennis and basketball.

The three acres most recently purchased contain existing structures on them which will be used by the Suffolk County Parks Department for a check-in station, parks maintenance equipment, a caretaker residence and include a small office area for parks personnel, Mr. Krupski said during prior to its purchase.

“The North Fork Preserve has been called ‘Suffolk’s last great park’ and I agree with that description,” Mr. Krupski said during the final acquisition. “The park, with fishing, hiking, camping and more, will be a highlight of the entire Suffolk County park system.”

Read more about the committee in the proposed legislation:

North Fork Preserve Advisory Committe